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February 04, 1966 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-02-04

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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4,1986 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Sovic
MOSCOW (P)-A Soviet space
station made history's first soft
landing on the moon yesterday,
Moscow announced. British sci-
entists in England said the un-
manned capsule, Luna 9, sent
pictures back to earth from the
moon's surface.
A Tass announcement said the
landing was made at 9:45:30 p.m.
Moscow time-1:45:30 p.m. EST
-after the ship, launched Jan.
31, had hurtled through space for
more than three days.
Sir Bernard Lovell, director of
the radiotelescopic observatory at
Jodrell Bank, England, said the
feat "puts the Russians ahead in
the space race."
American Attempt
The first American attempt at
a soft landing, a key step in put-
ting a man on the moon, is not
expected before May.
A soft landing means bringing
an instrument package down on
the surface slowly enough so that
there is no crash and resultant de-
struction.
Lovell said the information Luna
9 was radioing back to the Rus-
sians makes a manned landing on
the moon a possibility within this
decade.

Capsule

From Washington, President
Johnson sent a personal message
to the Soviet Union on the achieve-
ment, saying "all mankind ap-
plauds" the landing.
Vice-President Hubert H. Hum-
phrey, chairman of the National
Aeronautical and Space Council,
said "particularly do I 'compli-
ment the Soviet authorities and
experts on their stamina and per-
sistence in attaining this lunar
goal."
Four previous Soviet attempts
at a soft landing had failed.
Jodrell observatory scientists
said Luna 9 had sent facsimile
pictures back to earth from the
moon's surface.
The soft landing, keeping equip-
ment intact after slowing down
from a speed of some 6000 miles
an hour to less than 15 miles an
hour, means the Russians may
now have the technical knowl-
edge to put a man on the moon.
The soft landing is accomplished
with retrorockets.
Retrorockets
The success means that for the
first time the retrorockets were
timed perfectly to ease the ship
down. Parachutes cannot be used
in the thin lunar atmosphere so

rockets firing against the direc-
tion of flight have to brake the
speed.
Now Luna 9 may be able to
radio back to earth data on the
composition of the moon's surface
that could be essential for landing
a man.
It could also permit taking and
radioing back to earth closeup
pictures of the moon's surface.
These could help choose a land-
ing spot for the first lunar ex-
plorers.
The brief Tass announcement
on the landing-the first official
word on the progress of the flight
since it was launched Monday-
gave only spotty details.
Nothing was said about the size,
shape, construction or weight of
the scientific instrument pack-
age. It is thought likely to weigh
more than 3000 pounds. Nothing
was said immediately about the
kind of data being radioed back
to earth.
Soviet commentators soon beam-
ed out thousands of words in
praise of the accomplishment.
One commentator asked how
soon would a manned landing on
the moon, 238,000 miles from the
earth, follow.

Hits]
"American specialists believe
that they will be able to send
their fellow countryman to the
moon until (sic) 1970. Soviet sci-
entists prefer not to tie their
hands by precise deadlines, bear-
ing in mind the entire complexity
of pilot flight to another heaven-
ly body."
In England, Sir Bernard Lovell,
director of the Jodrell Bank Ra-
dio Telescopic Observatory, said
the landing "puts the Russians
ahead in the space race."
Officials here quickly concede
the landing gives Russia a lead in
this important phase of the moon
race, but does not necessarily give
it the overall edge-which is dif-
ficult to assess because of So-1
viet secrecy about much of its
space exploration.
U.S. Leads
The United States leads in many
areas-total man hours in space;
longest manned flights; demon-
stration of maneuverable space-
ships; rendezvous of two manned
ships and medical data.
Russia holds a slight advantage
in rocket power and the two na-
tions are even in manned space
walks. One major goal not ac-
complished by either nation is

1oon
linkup of a manned vehicle with
another satellite. The U.S. Gemini

AMBITIOUS PLAN:
Commission Recommends
Minimum Income Guarantee

8 flight is to attempt such a WASHINGTON iP) --- A blue-
hookup next month. ribbon commission recommended
The landing also focuses atten- to President Johnson and Con-
tion on a similar U.S. effort- gress yesterday that every Amer-
the troubled Surveyor program ican family be guaranteed a min-
which has yet to get off the imum annual income.
ground and which a congressional The annual cost of such a plan
committee recently termed "one was said to range from $2 bil-
of the least orderly and most poor-'lion to $20 billion, depending on
ly executed of'NASA projects." its scope. As many as 35 million
Share Findings Americans could be affected if aI
American space officials here minimum income level was fixed
praised the Luna 9 success and at $3000 a year. '
said they hoped the Soviets would .
share the spacecraft's findingsI This was but one of dozens of
with other nations. ambitious recommendations that
Hopefully, Luna 9 will report on grew out of a year-long study
the composition of the moon's sur- by a 14-member National Com-
face-whether it is a sea of dust, mission on Technology, Automa-'
a dangerous crater-pocked plain, tion and Economic Progress. The
a smooth hard covering or some- group was created by Congress:
thing else. and appointed by Johnson to study
U.S. scientists believe the land- technological unemployment and
ing gear they have developed for related problems."
this nation's Apollo moonship is Controversy
sufficient to survive a landing on1 Many of the commission find-
a smooth section of the surface. 1 ings are certain to arouse con-
But they will not commit men troversy. Perhaps anticipating
to moon journeys until they are this, it said "today's more advanc-
sure of the composition. ed ideas will be commonplace to-
May Landing morrow."
After years of problems, the first The guaranteed income idea was
Surveyor now is scheduled to at- labeled worthy of further study
temptsa soft-landing on the moon in Johnson's economic report to
in May. But some officials give Congress last month. Under the
it only about a 50-50 chance of plan, the federal government
succeeding. Because of the comn- would make up the difference be-
plexity of the mission, seven iden- tween a family's actual income
tical Surveyors are being built in and a fixed minimum standard.
hopes that at least one will suc-
ceed before the end of 1967. Almost every recommendation
Russia failed in four earlier soft drew unanimous support from the
landing attempts last year. Each panel, which included such prom-
failure contributed to the success inent citizens of diverse view-
of Luna 9. points as board chairman Thomas
I ~_____________________________ ~ -..-. ____________ - - -

J. Watson, Jr. of IBM Corp., and $ school. Students would move on
Walter P. Reuther. president of i to community colleges or vocation-
the United Auto Workers Union. al schools.

Recommendations
Among the unanimous recom-
mendations in the 210-page re-
port were these:
- The federal government
should become "employer of last
resort" for the hard-core jobless,
paying them to work in its hos-
pitals, schools, police departments
and other "useful community en-
terprises." One-half million jobs
would be provided initially at a
first-year cost of about $2 bil-
lion with the program expanding
steadily over a five-year period.
-Every young American should
be offered free education for two
years after graduation frem high

Blue Collar
-Blue collar workers who are
now paid hourly when they work
should be paid regular salaries,
like white collar employes, so they
would have greater stability of
income and additional fringe
benefits.
-Social Security benefits should
be increased and public welfare
programs should be reformed and
made more generous.
- The federal government
should set a national model build-
ing code and deny certain assist-
ance, such as federal housing au-
thority mortgages, to communities
failing to adopt it.

In Detroit .. .
I CONCEPT EAST THEATER
presents
Harold Pinter's "THE

401 E. Adams

S
ECARETAKER"

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Fri., Sat., Sun.-Thru FEB.

8:30 P M

In association with the American Playwrights Theatre
UN IVERSITY PLAYERS
Present

UNITED NATIONS (IP) - After
two days of public debate on Viet
Nam, UN diplomats yesterday be-
gan a round of intensive private'
talks which the United States re-
gards as part of a new peace of-
fensive.
The public debate may be re-
sumed later, but informal quar-
ters said President Johnson's pri-
mary objective in bringing the Viet
Nam problem before the UN Se-
curity Council was to help stim-
ulate further peace moves. The
informants said this has been
achieved.
The President was understood
to have acted on a recommenda-
tion by Ambassador Arthur J.
Goldberg and Secretary of State
Dean Rusk after the administra-
tion had concluded last weekend
that North Viet Nam's President
Ho Chi Minh .had slammed the
door on the December-January
peace offensive.;
Private Basis
There are indications that the
United States may be content to
keep the UN negotiations on a
private basis - at least for the
present. Future public debate in
the Security Council, however, has

not been ruled out. If agreement
can be reached, for example, coun-
cil members might decide it was
desirable to formalize the accord.
Goldberg himself is participat-
ing in a round of consultations
with members of the 15-nation
council. He expects to talk with
each member, including Soviet
Ambassador Nikolai T. Fedoren-
ko. Informed quarters said he takes
it for granted that the talks cer-
tainly will lead to new contracts
with North Viet Nam and Red
China.
U Thant Involved
A UN spokesman said Secretary-
General U Thant also is engag-
ed in private. discussions. The
spokesman said Thant "still feels
that the nonaligned countries
could contribute significantly to-
ward a peaceful settlement" of the
Viet Nam conflict.
Goldberg was reported to see
at least a few signs that things
are moving in the right direction.
Informed sourcestsaid he hadnot-
ed with interest Hanoi's state-
ment that a new Geneva confer-
ence is the proper agency for
dealing with the Viet Nam prob-
lem.

i
'i
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t
i

I QC-ASSEMBLY

SHOW

Robert

Anderson s

I

1%i

0
bill

Cosby

THE DAYS BETWEEN
Tonight and Saturday
8:00 P.M.--Trueblood Auditorium
Box Office open 12:30-8 P.M. curtain
TICKETS ALSO AVAILABLE FOR:

Ticket sales will re-open

CASSAN DRA

Friday, Feb. 4,

1:00 P.M.

Hill Auditorium Box Office

VIET MISERY
A member of the 1st Air Cavalry Division, operating near Bong
Son during "Operation Masher," clutches the hand of a smal
boy whose father lies wounded after a shelling of the village by
U.S. forces. Wounded civilians were removed to hospitals by heli-
copter after the troops drove a heavy concentration of Viet Cong
from the area around the village.

Second Balcony..........$2.25
Standing Room .......... $1.00

by C. B. Gilford and Elizabeth Gibson
FEBRUARY 16-19
8:00 P.M. Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
PREMIERE PRODUCTION!
ROSALINDA-MARCH 16-19
PEER GYNT-APRIL 6-9
I1

HOW TO ARGUE

FOREIGN RELA TIONS:
Senate Committee To Resume
"'1 -1 -1.tI Zo4 *, XA T-

CAMPUS

Dial 8-6416
HOLDING FOR STILL
ANOTHER WEEK

WITH A

-I

ru~i un eairiiig 0.11 v

WASHINGTON (M--America's
role in the Vietnamese war is due
for a further airing before the
Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee.
The committee decided yester-
day to resume public hearings on
the issue starting at 8:30 a.m. to-
day..
Chairman J. W. Fulbright (D-
Ark),. who opposed the resump-
tion' of bombing in North Viet
Nam, told reporters that witness-
es both in.and out of government
will be invited to testify and the
hearings will continue "as long as
they are fruitful."
No Conflict
Fulbright said he sees no con-
flict with the United Nations' de-
cision to hold a Security Council

debate on Viet Nam. No date has
been set for the start of the UN
discussion, which was requested
by the United States.
The Senate committee, barred
from conducting hearings while
the Senate is in session, decided
to meet before and after, Senate
hours. It scheduled its second
hearing for 6:30 p.m. Monday, on
the theory the Senate will have
quit then for the day.
Fulbright said that "if it works
out," nightly hearings will be held
while the Senate is disposing of
its current fight over union shop
legislation.
No Plans
There are no immediate plans to
call Secretary of State Dean Rusk
back, but Fulbright said he would

1C3L lI dII1
be "very surprised if the com-
mittee feels it is through ques-
tioning the secretary of state."
Rusk was questioned for more
than four hours last Friday by
committee critics of U.S. policy in
Southeast Asia.
Today's witness will be the for-
eign aid administrator, David E.
Bell. He will be questioned about
President Johnson'strequest for
$415 million in supplemental for-
eign aid funds, largely for Viet
Nam, which is the formal business
before the committee.
Witnesses
Witnesses for the Monday night
session are to be announced later.
Fulbright said the committee in-
tends to call on those whose back-
ground and views have a bearing
"on our policy in Southeast Asia."
"Witnesses will testify by invi-
tation only," he said. "We are not
trying to put on a circus."

FEB. 16 & 17 Onlyat
The STATE THEATRE
6 PERFORMANCES ONLY!
TICKETS ON SALE NOW!
AN ACTUAL ERFORMANCE OF THE
NATIONAL\THEATREOFGREAT BRITAIN
LAURENCE
OLEVEER
OTHELLO
A BHE PRODUCTION
MAGGiE JOYC ANK
SMITH -REDMANa FINLAY
STUAT BURGE AI4IONY HA1ECA a
JOHN BRABOURNE
UUNIO)LOr PUIWF'fR=*M AIM ER MOS.
1:30 Show ........ $1.50
4:30 Special Student
Show ..............$1.00
8:00 Show . .. ..S2.25

CONSERVATIVE
By Neil Staebler and Douglas Ross

Meet the authors at an
AUTOGRAPHING PARTY

at

V~"COMEDY HAS A NEW FREEDOM!
It swells with joy, zest, delight in the
world! A great film! Moviegoers can re-
joice now!" -Newsweek Magazine
iii lW3 iICTUiR Ili
BN AY==OOS MI4AERAWIU MDONAMLON JX

Bob Marshall's Book Shop
TODAY, FEBRUARY 4th
3 P.M. to 5 P.M. and 7 P.M. to 9 P.M.

Free Coffee, etc.

I

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I

TONIGHT! -HILL AUDITORIUM

Purchase Tickets in Advance to be
sure of Seat! Tickets now on sale
at the Campus, Michigan & State
Boxoffices.

I ,
* I
TONIGHT AT 7and 9
* ,
One of the first "monster" films /
r ,
I I
I I
Two versions of the Jewish legand.
* U
with Harry Bour.
I
I :
Twortve rsi fteJewisHleardy

7:00 P.M.

NAT HENTOFF,

TONIGHT!
PTP pejehto A.C.T.

noted Jazz critic, author, and contributor to
The New Yorker, Playboy, and Downbeat.

I

t

Speaking on: The Fine Arts:
Scope Yet for Individualism?

I

LATE, LATE SHOW!

I

I

Samuel Beckett's
ENDGAME
By Author of "Waiting for Godot" &
"Krapp's Last Tape"
FRIDAY, FEB. 4

8:30 the U of M JAZZ BAND .
Featuring "MARIA" from West Side Story, "STOCHOLM SWEETIN" .

IN CONCERT
"LIL' DARLIN"' . . . "MOTIVOS"

I

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PLUS DIXIELAND and THE BEATLES JAZZ STYLE-And many more selections

I

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in "Me and My Paul"
I VPTl9VIIAUTT T

11 PAM

: .
.
' f
. .: ,

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.

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MINNEMMIM

.. ...

AN

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