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February 03, 1966 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-02-03

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

- E TCUJ m-mmIAJV TURSDmmEBRURY m19.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1966

'THE DAYS BETWEEN':
Players Production Makes
Most of Unsatisfying Work

'DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR':
McCracken Receives Award

A

N

decorator

By JOHN ALLEN
Eddardine Poblocki led the way
through the thickets of Robert
Anderson's "The Days Between"
last night, followed closely by
Robert McGill-who stepped into
a difficult role at the last minute
and moved through it with pro-
fessional courage.

McGill's casual aloofness suited
the role well, though there were
moments when he seemed to un-
derplay the part even more than
dramatically necessary. It was
Miss Poblocki's performance, how-
ever, which did most to compen-
sate for the limitations of the play
itself.

Experiments Reveal Effects
Of Chemicals on Memory

(Continued from Page 1)
Yet if the injections were not
made until one hour had elapsed
after the completion. of training,
there was no noticible deteriora-
tion or blockage .of memory.
"It would seem, then, that a
process of fixation of information
into a stable form had been com-
pleted," Agranoff commented.
The outcome of these experi-
ments raises some questions about
the fundamental nature of mem-
ory storage which are unanswer-
able with the available data.
According to a hypothetical
model designed by Agranoff and
his colleagues to explain the gold-
fish phenomenon, incoming bits
of knowledge seem to be held in
a "short-term" circuit. This mem-
ory circulates in some unknown
manner within the brain, under-
going a reorganization process. If
this reorganization process is not
interrupted, the knowledge be-
comes "fixed recorded, or tran-
scribed into permanent memory,"
Agranoff speculated.
The exact process by which
puromycin does interrupt the
short-term memory and prevent
it from becoming long-term mem-
ory holds the key to the entire
pattern of memory and recall.
Puromycin is an artificial chem-
ical compound that structurally
resembles an amino acid that at-
taches to the end of ribosenumleic
acid (RNA), a long thread-like
protein molecule manufactured in
the bodies of animal' cells. When
puromycin is released within the
vicinity of RNA replicating itself,
it replaces the last amino acid in
the RNA chain and causes it to be
released prematurely. Previous re-
search has shown that the pre-
maturely released RNA will not
produce enzymes and proteins
properly.
How this physiological inter-
ruption causes loss of memory re-
mains an unconfirmed hypothesis
at the present time.
"Before the present research in-
,to memory theory and process be-
gan in this country, almost all of
our knowledge of the subject came
only from humans," said Agranoff.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to official-
ly recognized and registered student
organizations only. Forms are available
in Room 1011 SAB.
Baptist Student Union, Discussion:
"The Nature of Man," Fri., Feb. 4, 7:30
p.m., 1131 Church St.
* * *
U. of M. Chess Club, Meeting & reg-
istration for tournament, Feb. 4, 7:30
p.n., Room 3C, Union.
UAC Symposium, Nat Hentoff on
"The Future of American Individual-
ism," Fri., 7 p.m., Hill Aud.-"The
Fine Arts: Scope Yet for Individual-
Ism?" '*
UAC Symposium, "The Impact of In-
dividualism on our Foreign Policy," Dr.
Walter Judd, 8 p.m., Rackham Aud.,
Fri.
French Club, Le baratin, Jeudi, 3-5
p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg. venez tous.
* * "
The Christian Science Organization,
Thurs. evening meeting, 7:30 p.m.,
3545 SAB.
* **
Folk Dance Club (WAA), Folk Dance,
with instruction, every Friday, 8-11
pam., Barbour Gym.

"Since then our knowledge of the
process in rats, goldfish and other
lower life forms has been greatly
enlarged,."
"Our first big clue came from
the retrograde phenomenon of
memory recovery. For example, a
person who has been knocked out
in an automobile accident wakes
up in the hospital and is unable
to remember much about what
happened to him. His memory be-
gins to recover slowly over the
recuperation period. The first
things he remembers are not the
latest things that happened to
him; rather he remembers the
first incidents that happened in
the accident, and later the events
are recalled in the order in which
they happened.
"Just recently we have learned
that goldfish injected with puro-
mycin within one hour before
training began to show behavior
similar to the Korsakoff syndrome
in humans. The subject is alert
and able to learn and retain new
knowledge for a short time. Be-
yond a certain limit he cannot re-
call his new knowledge although
he has memories of events learned
before the injections," Agranoff
explained.
Besides substantiating their dis-
coveries with new. data, Agranoff
and his colleagues are pursuing
the question of a more precise
picture of the relationship be-
tween observable behavior and
chemical processes in memory
formation and inhibition, financ-
ed by a National Science Founda-
tion grant.

As Barbara Ives, long-suffering
wife of a frustrated author-turn-
ed-teacher, Miss Poblocki did
credit to her own talents and to
those of director Richard Burgwin.
It is unfortunate that the needed
support which should have come
from Lynn Thompson as Mrs.
Walker (Barbara's mother) and
from George McGilliard as Mr.
Ives was not stronger. The diffi-
culties .lie mostly in Anderson's
script: he has involved them both
in roles which are not quite be-
lievable.
The struggles of the would-be
writer who detests the "cruddy"
realities of daily living, the neces-
sary fight for bread and self-re-
spect, have been done and over-
done both on the stage and in the
contemporary novel.
The histrionics which are writ-
ten into the play cannot be stif-
led by any degree of controlled
underplaying, no matter how fine
the production. It is to the credit
of the University Players that
they did so well with an inher-
ently unsatisfying play.
Patricia Ralph and J. Garry
Schoen should be mentioned for
their excellent set and use of
lighting: the stark geometry of
the production did not interfere
with the smooth flow of the per-
formance. Imagination and tech-
nical skill joined nicely to con-
tribute their share to the over-all
polish which characterized the
evening. Bruce Fulton as the
young son of the Iveses also de-
serves his share of the credit for
the evening's satisfactions.
On the whole the production's
highlights . outshone the darker
moments of Anderson's play. As
the productions inevitably improve
through the weekend, perhaps the
play itself will appear brighter:
though there is always the chance
that the discrepancy will become
more, rather than less, apparent.
It is worth the investment of an
evening, in any case. Miss Pob-
locki and the rest of the Univer-
sity Players have done their part
in successfully inaugurating the
American Playwrights T h e a t r e
program. The program itself de-
serves success: and ilke the U
Players, increasingly better plays.

EDITOR'S NOTE: On January 21,
the Board of Regents honored four
University professors with the Dis-
tinguished Professorship Award.
This is the second of four articles
honoring the recipients.
By MARY ELLEN THOMPSON
Professor Paul W. McCracken
was given the title of Edmund E.
Day University Professor of Busi-
ness Administration by the U-M
board of regents at their January
meeting. The people the "dis-
tinguished" professors are honored
for are persons who have made
outstanding contributions to the
University. Edmund E. Day served
as the founder and first dean of
the Graduate School of Adminis-
tration.
McCracken was chosen to re-
ceive the honor because, according
to the regents, he "enjoys an in-
ternational reputation of the high-
est order. He is well known for
his analytical mind, keen insight
in private affairs and his objec-
tivity in dealing with controver-
sial questions."
He earned his A.B. from Wil-
liam Penn College and later an
honorary L.H.D. From Harvard he
received his M.A. and PhD. He
has written over twenty-five
papers on economic and financial
policy. He has worked as Financial
Economist and Director of Re-
search at the Federal Reserve
Bank of Minneapolis, as economic

advisor to President Eisenhower
and served on a three-man task
force selected by the late President
Kennedy to study the state of the
economy.

His many professional associa-
tions include the American Eco-
nomic, Financial and Statistical
Associations, the Econometric So-
Society. He is an advisory mem-
ber on the Economic Expansion
Council (Mich.) and of the Eco-
nomic Outlook Forum of the Na-
tional Industrial Confere nce
Board, New York. He is also a
director on the board of many
different corporations.
Among his many awards and
honors are Civic Award of Alpha
Kappa Psi, Miami University
(1957), Distinguished F ac u l t y
Award, U-M (1959), Award of
Merit, Alumni Association, Wm.
Penn College (1961) and inclu-
sion in Who's Who in America and
American Men of Science.
He has written that his first
honor was when he was attending
No. 1 Blackhawk Township's
Country school. He achieved the
most impressive facial contortions
in a gum chewing contest. This
taught him his first important
lesson that everyone has an ap-
titude for doing something use-
ful.

furnished, fully carpeted.
UflIV(RSITY TOWERS
" A ) ic nting for A ug.
S. UNIVERSITY AVE. & FOR EST AVE. PHONE: 761-3536,
IN CONCERT
Z ~ HILL AUD.
Z FREE Z
B TheUof M JAZZ BAND B
A A Also: Lecture by
NAT HIENTOFF, noted Jazz Critic
and Author-H ILL-7 P.M. N
Sponsored by UAC and The School of Music

M

PROF. PAUL W. McCRACKEN

il -I

*

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS

Presents
SIDNEY POITIER'S

I1

Academy Award Winning Performance
LILIES OF.
THlE FIELD

*

Friday & Saturday

Feb. 4,5

I

i

ri v I[ 11J;

7 and 9:05 P.M.
AUDITORIUM A, ANGELL HALL
Adiission 50c

NO SEATS RESERVED
Shows at 1:15-3:50-6:30-9:00
Mts. $1.25; Eves. & Sun. $1.50
90th Contuy-Fes
COLOR BY OE [UXE
CINEMASCOPE

STARTING FRIDAY
Shows of 1 :30-4:30 & 8:00 P.M.

DIRECT FROM ITS PREMIERE SHOWINGS.
SPECIAL.ENGAGEMENT AT SPECIAL PRICES. NO RESERVED SEATS.

I.

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tMAMILE,

Dial 8-6416
HOLDING FOR STILL
ANOTHER WEEK

" "COMEDY HAS A NEW FREEDOM!
It swells with joy, zest, delight in the

world! A great
joce now! "

film! Moviegoers can re-
-Newsweek Magazine

FEB. 16 & 17 Only at
The STATE THEATRE
6 PERFORMANCES ONLY!
TICKETS ON SALE NOWI
AN ACTUAL PERFORMANCE OF THE
NATIONATHEATRE OF GREAT BRITAIN
LAURENCE
OLEVEE
OTHELLO
A BE PRODUCTION
SMITH REDMANanrdFINLA'
TABURGE AHNY HAVELOCKALAN and
JOHN BRABOURNE.
iE= 'w r ruia fROM WAME BM
1:30 Show......... $1.50

I

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- BEST PICTURE
CANNES
FILM FESTIVAL
T1965
9 -0RECVMMENDEDOFOR
RAYBROOKS MICHAELCRAWFORD DONALDONNELLY
TONIGHT AT 7 and 9
One of the first "monster" films
I f
TH I U,,V
I U
I Two versions of the Jewish legand.
The slent classic by Paul Wegener
and the climax of the sound version

I

1

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4x

"
1
M

with Harry Baur.

"
IHardv

WinnerB of 0 Academy Awards
including Best Picture.
AIInRFY HFPkIIPN*RFX HARRI21N

4:30 Special Student
Show ..............$1.00

Short: Laurel andI

II

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111 A 33fl^Akl* I PAPlI

I

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