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February 03, 1966 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-02-03

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A

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3 1996"

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3,1968 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

'UN T o
Dir sen
U.S. To Get
UN Debate
On Viet .Nam
Jordan Vote Decisive
As Security Council
Plans Peace Talks
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. {M)-
The United States won its fight
Wednesday for a full-scale de-
bate in the UN Security Council
on Viet Nam. But harsh words
from the Soviet Union appeared to
rule out any chances for agree-
ment on any peace plan carrying
a UN label.
The vote of Jordan, coming
* a f t e r last-minute instructions
from Amman, gave U.S. Ambas-
sador Arthur J. Goldberg victory
in his drive for the required nine
affirmative votes for putting the
question formally before the coun-
cil.
The vote in the 15-member
* council was 9-2 with 4 absten-
tions. Immediately afterward, the
council adjourned for consulta-
tions on when to launch what is Secreta
expected to be a lengthy, acrid after to
debate. terday.
North
Procedural Question McNam
The no votes were cast by the wheele
Soviet Union and Bulgaria while
France, Mali, Uganda and Nigeria
abstained. The big-power veto did PRO
not apply because the question
was only a procedural one.
Supporting the United States
were Argentina, Britain, China,
Japan, Jordan, the Netherlands,
New Zealand, and Uruguay.
The U.S. victory was assured
when Waleed M. Sadi, the Jor- F 1
danian delegate, announced his
country wanted a full examination
of the issue by the council. MOSCC
Sadi had kept the council on ernment 1
edge while he awaited instruc- yesterda
tions from Amman on how to of the fo
vote. At his request the council Produc
decided late Tuesday to postpone has accel
a vote until Wednesday afternoon. years an
risen, ac
Debate Helpful 1965 by
He expressed hope that a debate Board.
would be a preliminary step to It said
a final course of action that nonagrict
could end the war in Viet Nam. He average
took cognizance of arguments that month, u
a heated debate might worsen the and dout
situation, but said there were C
equally valid arguments that a Countir
debate would not be harmful, social se
"That's good enough for my care, the
delegation," he added. factory,
Immediately after the Jordan- workers
ian speech, Soviet Delegate Niko- a month
lai T. Fedorenko delivered a Earnin
strong attack on U.S. actions in are almo
Viet Nam.
Attacks Move
He charged the United States!
with coming to the council in'
order to mask what he called the
flouting of the agreements reached
at the Geneva conference of 1954. By
He said that the only way
peace can be achieved in Viet Indian
Nam is on the basis of the Geneva forces ar
accords and the recognition of the the Sialki
National Front for Liberation, the cording
political arm of the Viet Cong, of the In
as the only genuine representative in accor
of the people of Viet Nam. agreemen
piete wit

He said that in order to comply by Feb.
with the Geneva accords the Unit-
ed States must withdraw all its ZURIC
military forces from South Viet United S
Nam. twice as
He reminded the council that launchin
North Viet Nam had served notice the Swis
it would regard as invalid any of RockE
resolutions on Viet Nam approved It figure
by the Security Council. for the
He said that the 37-day pause France.
in the U.S. bombing of North Viet around
Nam was nothing but a bluff, and 43 Russia
that resumption indicated only
further expansion of the war. SAIGO

Discuss
Blocks

Asia

as

FOR OVERSEAS:
Aid Program Funds
Sought by Johnson

I

International
EMPHASIS
MONTH

PY1 tP

" I

::;: ,:
4,

L/1 tWASHINGTON (R) - President tion foundations that would invest
Johnson, putting a wide range of in basic educational projects in
old and new programs into a the developing countries.
single package asked Congress on -A variety of efforts to send
ene a1 O Wednesday to set aside $524 mil- more American health and educa-
lion next year to fight ignorance, tion experts abroad, and to help
hunger and disease around the train more foreigners in these
A sian Talk~s globetg. 6 specialities. mllo
Ashisalk ricse tag repreets a 60: Eadicate Smallpox
per cent increase over current Johnson promised an expanded'
annual spending of $331 million war on disease aimed at world-
for similar international health wide eradication of smallpox by
and education programs. 1975 and the elimination of ma-
Although much of the added laria throughout the Western"
Dirksen, Mansfield money would finance expansion of Hemisphere and in eight African
Clash on Committee existing programs, Johnson out- and Asian nations within 10 years.
aC m e lined some brand new ideas in a ThePresident also proposed that
Meeting Procedure special message to Congress a ,the 70 million foreign children
Corps-in-Reverse now getting Food-for-Peace aid be
WASHINGTON ()-A move by These include a proposed Peace increased to 150 million within five
the Senate Foreign Relations Corps-in-reverse that would bring years.
Committee to reopen hearings at 5,000 foreigners to the United He also promised new birth con-
which members have criticized States to teach their language trol aid for countries asking such,
U.S. policy in Asia was blocked and culture in the schools, and to help in order to meet a popula-
Wednesday by Sen. Everett M. work beside American, volunteers tion problem that "threatens the!
Dirksen. in the antipoverty program. dignity of the individual and the
Senate Foreign Relations Com- Calling for "a worldwide ef- sanctity of the family."
mittee chairman J. W. Fulbright fort to rid mankind of the slavery Partner Schools
spoke for renewal of the hearings of ignorance and the scourage of In education, Johnson recom-
in which members last week disease," Johnson said: mended that 1,000 American
scorched Secretary of State Dean "Ours is the great opportunity schools form partnerships, already
Rusk on Asian policies. to challenge all nations, friend pioneered on a small scale, a U.S.
Dirksen, the Senate Republican and foe alike, to join this battle." school may assist the brick-and-
leader from Illinois, objected be- Urging swift congressional pas- mortar construction of a sister,
cause he had other interests to sage of new international educa- school in less-developed nations.
promote. tion and health laws, Johnson said The exchange can grow to include
Rule Conflict the national interest warrants it books and equipment; teacher and"
The point of contention is a and "the work of peace demands student visits," he said.
Senate rule which forbids com- it." Most of the cost, he said, would

I
f
I
I

--Associated Press

IcNAMARA FACES SENATE
ry of Defense Robert McNamara meets with newsmen
estifying before the Senate Armed Services Committee yes-
The secretary told senators that United States bombing of
Viet Nam is being limited to "military targets only." To
nara's right is Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. Earle
r.
DUCTION UP:
ussia To Achieve
!scal Prosperity

mittees from meeting while the
Senate is in session..
Democratic Leader Mike Mans-
field of Montana has been calling
Senate meetings two hours earlier
than usual at 10 a.m., in a gentle-
manly attempt to break a fili-
buster being managed by Dirksen.
Seeking to prevent the Senate
from taking up a House-passed
bill which would end state author-
ity to ban union shop contracts,
Dirksen retaliated by objecting to
committee meetings. This forced
senators either to hold early morn-
ing or night meetings, a circum-
stance most of them find incon-
venient, or not meet at all.
Impede Safety
With Fulbright lounging against
a desk nearby, Sen. Joseph S.
Clark (D-Pa) jumped up to say
that those who were blocking full
exploration of foreign policy he
and .others want "are assuming a
serious responsibility for the safety
and future of this nation."
Dirksen said he was perfectly
willing to clear the way for any
action the Senate wants to take
on Viet Nam issues. All Mansfield:
had to do, he said, was to with-
draw the motion to take up the
union shop bill.
"Is compulsory unionism more
important than the lives of the
young men who are slugging
through the swamps of Viet
Nam?" Dirksen asked.

Some other new ideas in the
Johnson program include:
-Use of government-owned
foreign currencies now standing
idle to finance binational educa-

be borne by the, participating
schools.
Officials said the exchange
Peace Corps also would be fi-
nanced largely by private funds.

RUSSIAN OPINION:
Treaty Needed To Halt
07 1 P1X 7A

EVENTS FOR THE WEEK
OF FEBRUARY 1-6
Thursday, February 3: 3:30-5:00 P.M.-International Tea at Theta
Xi Fraternity, 1345 Washtenaw. Open to the campus.
Thursday, February 3: 8:00 P.M. in the Union, Rm. 3C-Dr. Klinger,
who received the Rockefeller Grant, will discuss his trip to Mexico,
Guatemala, Ecuador and Peru.
Friday, February 4: 8:00 P.M.---Folk Sing at the International Center.
Friday, February 4: 8:00 P.M-Concert by internationally known
U of M Jazz Band at Hill Auditorium.
Saturday, February 5: 1:30-3:30 P.M.-Wesley Foundation. African
Students Union is presenting on African Seminar.
Sunday, February 6: 4:30 P.M.--CBS Television Network. Twientieth
Century: "How to Fight a Guerrilla War."
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EVENINGS8:30 P.M. SUN. EVES. 8:00 P.M. I UNITED ARTISTS Theatre - 140 Bagley
MATINEES WED., SAT., SUN. at 200 P.M. I Ave., Detroit 26. and enoe itamped ucif
ADMISSION PRICES tddryed envelope.
MATS. WED.& SAT. $I.50-$2.00-$2.50
MATS. SUN. & 110, $.0-2.50-$3.00 I AOeACS______________
ALL EVENINGS $2.$2.50-$3.00OI. E
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OW (M)-The Soviet gov-
told its 232 million people
they are getting some
rng-promised better life.
tion of consumer goods
lerated rapidly in recent
d average incomes have.
ccording to a report on
the Central Statistical
the nation's 77 million
ultural workers earned an,
of 95 rubles-$105.55-a'
up five rubles from 19641
ble the 1946 figure.
Cites Real Income
rng bonuses and such!
ervices as free medical
real average income of
office and commercial!
was 128 rubles-$142.22-
last year, the report said.
gs in the United States
ost as much per week as

the Soviet monthly figures. But
differing conditions make direct
comparisons difficult and for the
Russian people the important
thing has been their progress up-
ward.
Production of consumer goods in
1965 was listed as 8.5 per cent
above 1964. In 1963 the gain had
only been 3 per cent over 1962, and
in 1964 the increase over 1963
was 5.1 per cent.
Khrushchev Gains
The increasing rate of con-
sumer goods production meant
that promises made by former
Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev and
renewed with greater emphasis by
his successor, Alexei N. Kosygin,
were being at least partly kept.
The claims of an economy surg-
ing forward ignored targets which
had been set by Khrushchev in
1958 to be achieved in 1965.

dectof INI
Sprean0iN
MOSCOW (P)-Premier Alexei
N. Kosygin said in a message to,
the Geneva disarmament confer-
ence Wednesday night that the
Soviet government insists on the
need for immediate agreement on
a treaty to halt the spread of
nuclear weapons.
Kosygin's message, distributed
by the Soviet news agency Tass,
said that the Soviet Union is
ready "to assue the commitment
not to be the first to use nuclear
weapons if other nuclear powers
do not do the same."
It also said that "with the ob-
ject of facilitating an under-'
standing" the Soviet government
would accept a clause forbidding
the use of nuclear weapons against
parties to a treaty which do not
have such weapons on their own
territory."-

elear Arms
Tass said Kosygin's message
"sets out the proposals which the
Soviet government submitted for
the disarmament committee's con-
sideration."
The premier declared that they
can "furnish a foundation for a
further advance along the road of
disarmament."
Arguing for a nonproliferation
treaty, Kosygin said, "If a limit
is not set on the spread of nu-
clear weapons in the world, thej
danger of an outbreak of nuclear
war will increase many times
ovr.

C

World News Roundup

IQC-ASSEMBLY SHOW
bill cosb

I
i
i
i
I
,
3
i
I

THE
JAZZ
BAND
IN
CONCERT
Friday, Feb. 4-Hill

y The Associated Press
and Pakistani armed
e being withdrawn from
ot sector of Pakistan, ac-
to Lt. Gen. P. 0. Dunn
ndian army. This move is
Od with the Tashkent
nt, which envisaged com-
thdrawal by both armies
25.
"H, Switzerland -The
tates has made more than
many successful space
g as the Soviet Union,
ss Society for the Study
et Techniques estimated.
d the score at 255 to 123
leaders and listed one by
Of the 199 whirling
now, 155 are American,
an and one French.
* * *
)N-U.S. B52 jets joined

allied ground forces Wednesday in
harassing Communist companies
fleeing to the hills from Operation,
Masher, a coastal drive that has'
yielded 696 known Viet Cong dead
WASHINGTON - The House
voted to cite Robert M. Shelton,
imperial wizard of the Ku Klux
Klan, for contempt of Congress
in failing to produce records sub-
poenaed by its Committee on. Un-
American Activities.

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

Ticket sales will re-open
Friday, Feb. 4, 1 :00 P.M.
Hill Auditorium Box Office
Second Balcony ..........$2.25
Standing Room .......... $1.00

1

I

I TONIGHT AT 8:00 P.M.

I

PTP....

ppe4 en t4

A.C.T.

I

d

PROFESSIONAL THEATRE
PROGRAM

AMERICAN CONSERVATORY
THEATRE

PTP. jlee-enet4

A.C.T.

IN

I

I

LATE, LATE SHOW!

j

Samuel Beckett's
ENDGAME
By Author of "Waiting for Godot" &
"Krapp's Last Tape"
FRIDAY, FEB. 4

"A madly whirling carnival of mirth!"
-Pittsburgh Press
Ie
"Shimmering and immensely
appealing display of style
. . . thundering success!"
" i -Pittsburgh Daily-Dispatch
Y"Stunninglyrecreated N.Y. hit!"
-Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

11 P.M.

_-
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0 Vb Aft9ok w M E EW&M IPA -- ... r+nnTTILX t_- L_ -1,...1-6 r--4

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