100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 01, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-02-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1966

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1966

LAW SCHOOL:
Regents Give Bishop Award
For Outstanding Achievement

U.S. Asks UN To Set
Talks on Viet Nam War

BOMBING RESUMES:
Asian War Enters New Phase

EDITOR'S NOTE: On January 21,
the Board of Regents honored four
University professors with the Dis-
tinguished Professorship Award.
This is the first of four articles
honoring the recipients.
By SUSAN SCHNEPP
"It is especially nice to be re-
membered in this way by one's
own University and to be recog-
nized by one's longtime friends,"
Prof. William W. Bishop, Jr., of
the Law School, commented re-
cently after being ,honored with
the Distinguished Professorship
Award.
The award was named in hon-
or ofhEdwin DeWitt Dickinson, a
former professor at the Law
School and given to Bishop for
having "attained national and in-
ternational recognition for orig-
inality and scholarly achievement
and demonstratedteaching skill
and recognized breadth of inter-
est as 'well as depth of achieve-
ment."
Bishop was a student of the late
Dickinson and worked under him
while he taught at the Law School.
Their careers were also subse-
quently "intertwined," he said, at
the University of Pennsylvania
and elsewhere.
Legal Attitudes
Law, especially international
law, his specialty, is "new each
time you think of it," Bishop'
said. "Things no one worried
about in the past now need to be
regulated, such as radio broad-

the American Journal of Inter-
national Law, serving as editor-
in-chief from 1953-55 and from
1962 to the present.
Distinguished Career
In the summers of 1961 and
1965 Bishop was honored with
an invitation to give a series of
lectures on international law and
treaties at the Hague Academy
of International Law.
Born in 1906 in Princeton, N.J.,
he received his BA from the Uni-
versity in 1928 and his JD from
the Law School in 1931. He also
attended Harvard and Columbia
Law Schools, and was admitted
to the Michigan Bar Association
in 1931.
From 1939-47 Bishop was an
assistant to the legal adviser in
the United States State Depart-
ment. In this capacity he trav-
eled as a legal adviser to the U.S.
delegation to the Paris Peace'
Conference in 1946.
Fishing Treaties
While with the State Depart-
ment, Bishop became especially
interested in treaties concerning
fishing on the high seas, and since
then has worked on treaties to
regulate and protest fisheries and
fishermen.
Bishop who has taught at
Princeton University, Columbia
University, the University of Penn-
sylvania, and has been here since
1948, sees the University as one
"trying to melt together some of
the best of the Eastern and West-
ern schools, and a university I'm
glad to be associated with after
having worked at others."

(Continued from Page 1)
vidual voice for the National
Front for Liberation, the political
arm of the Viet Cong, in the pre-
liminary talks.
There was speculation that the
Soviet Union would ask that
North Viet Nam be invited to take
part in the Council debate. It was
understood the United States
would not object if the Council
decided to issue the invitation.
Geneva Accord
Both Hanoi and Peking have
been demanding that the Viet
Nam conflict be settled on the
basis of the 1954 Geneva Confer-
ence which divided Viet Nam into
North and South and called for
free elections to unify the coun-
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to official-
ly recognized and registered student
organizations only. Forms are available
in Room 1011 SAB.
S* * *
UAC Symposium on future of Amer-
ican individualism: "Students and 'The
System'," Feb. 1, 8 p.m., Rackham.
ULLR Ski Club, Film & talk by Hugo
Bohm of Boyne Mt. Plans for weekend
trip to Boyne, Feb. 1, 8 p.m., Union
Room 3B.
University Physical Therapy Club,
Monthly meeting, Wed., Feb. 2, 7:301
p.m., 3rd floor conference room, U.
Hospital. We will elect next year's of-
ficers, view slides taken at a camp for
handicapped children.
Inter-Quadrangle Council-Assembly
Association, House Presidents' meeting,
Feb. 1, 7:30 p.m., Michigan League.

try. They were never held. The
1962 conference dealt with Laos.
North Viet Nam is demandingt
also an immediate withdrawal of
U.S. military forces from South
Viet Nam, and is raising other
conditions which the United Statesj
finds unacceptable.
In a letter to Ambassador Roger
Seydoux of France, president of
the Council, Goldberg said that in
view of the failure to resolve the
Viet Nam conflict outside the
United Nations, the Council should
exert "its most vigorous endeavors
and its immense prestige to find-
ing a prompt solution to it."
Thant Informed
The U.S. ambassador also in-1
formed Thant Sunday night of the
U.S. decision to resume bombing
of North Viet Nam.
In a statement yesterday Thant
said the resumption "is apt to
hamper current diplomatic efforts
toward a peaceful settlement in
Viet Nam."
The general reaction among
U.N. diplomats was critical of the
U.S. decision to resume the bomb-
ing.
Goldberg reviewed in detail the
U.S. diplomatic peace offensive in
which he played a traveling role
and referred to the 37-day pause
in the U.S. bombing of North Viet
Nam which ended yesterday.
He said this had evoked only
charges by Hanoi and Peking that
the peace offensive was a fraud
and a swindle. He referred to a
letter from Ho Chi Minh, the
North Vietnamese leader, which
Goldberg said stipulated precon-
ditions to negotiations that would
in effect require the United States
to accept Hanoi's solution before
the beginning of negotiations.

(Continued from Page 1)
that the United Nations could ac-
complish much at this point. It
was noted that the Soviet Union
holds Security Council veto power
and that North Viet Nam has re-
fused prior invitations to come to
the UN.
Harriman Pessimistic
Roving Ambassador W. Averell
Harriman predicted that the So-
viets would not cooperate with the
U.S. effort to achieve Security
Council action on the war.
In a news conference, Secretary
of State Dean Rusk revealed that
the U.S. offered Hanoi an ex-
tension of the bombing lull if
North Viet Nam would respond

favorably to the U.S. peace pro-
posal.
The response from Hanoi "di-:
rectly and otherwise has been:
negative, harsh and unyielding,"
Rusk said.E
Infiltration Continues
The secretary of state reported
that North Viet Nam had utiliz-
ed the bombing lull to continue
its infiltration of men and arms
into the South. Military officials
said that at least 3000 troops per
month were now moving from
North to South Viet Nam.
State Department officials said
there had been more than two di-
rect U.S. contacts with the Ha-
noi government in the course of
the peace probe. At least one oc-

curred within the past 10 days.
Heavy ground operations con-
tinued in South Viet Nam with at
least four separate Allied offen-
sives under way early today.
Intensification Seen
Reports from Saigon told of
expectations that the war will
grow more intensive in the days
ahead. There is talk of a contin-
uing buildup of American troops.
U.S. forces in Viet Nain now
number about 197,000. These plus
another 123,000 aboard ships off-
shore and in supporting ppsts in
Guam, Okinawa and Thailand
bring the U.S. military manpow-
er involved in the war close tq
U.S. strength at the peak of the
Korean War.

WILLIAM BISHOP, JR.
casts and small pox vaccines."
Of special significance, he add-
ed ,is the growing importance of
nuclear weapons, which have caus-
ed legal attitudes toward the use
of force to change considerably.
In the field of international
law Bishop has published the book
"International Law Cases and Ma-
terials" and several articles. He
was a contributing editor to the
Annual Digest of Public Interna-
tional Law Cases from 1931-41.
Since 1947 he has been a mem-
ber of the Board of Editors of

And Fred, Mary, Steve, Cindy,
Ephren, Rick, Dinah, Vicki, Mike, Conrad,
Jon, Ron, Barb, and the rest of the
cast of thousands.
General Staff Meeting
is still going to be tomorrow,
Feb. 2, at 7:30 in the Stud. Pub.
to organize sales and preview the new issue-please be there!

S
N

F -Y fi' s : a s a s. a F i Y-a''-Q a z a a s -: v a s s v a a s v s c a s s s a
N

Aeross Campus.

MI
.4
p',,

i'.a.. a.:. a

-il

8 t 8 a s o a . s

TUESDAY, FEB. 1
8 a.m.--The Bureau of Indus-
trial Relations Seminar will pre-
sent "The Management of Man-
agers" in the Union.
1:30 p.m. - The Management
Development S e m i n a r presents
"Better Letter and Report Writ-
ing" in the Union.
4:30 p.m. - Donald C. Earl, of
Leeds, England, will discuss "The
Roman Aristocratic Ideal" in
Aud. A.
7:30 p.m.-Kingsbury Marzolf,
of the architecture dept., will
speak on "Historical Architecture
of Scandinavia" in the Architec-
ture Aud.
8 p.m.--The PTP will present
the ACT in Moliere's "Tartuffe"
at Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
8 p.m.-President Hatcher will
introduce a symposium on "The
Future of American Individual-
ism," after which Dr. Kenneth
Kenniston of Yale University
Medical School will deliver the

keynote speech, "Students and
'the System'," in Rackham Aud.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 2
8 a.m.-The Bureau of Indus-
trial Relations Workshop will pre-
sent "Letter and Report Writing"
in the Union.
8:30 a.m.-The Bureau of In-
dustrial Relations Workshop will
present "Letter and Report Writ-
ing" at the Union.
1:30 p.m. -- The Management
Development Seminar will present
"Problem Solving and Decision
Making" in the Union.
8 p.m.-The PTP will present
ACT in Moliere's "Tartuffe" at
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
8 p.m.-The University Players
will present Robert Anderson's
"The Days Between" at Trueblood
Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The Musical Society
Chamber Arts Series will present
Hermann Prey, baritone, at Rack-
ham Aud.

Use
Daily
Classified
Ads

4

I

DIAL 662-6264
SHOWS AT 1 :00
3:00-5:00-7:00 & 9:00
'1101) "TlHALR

I

a

U

I

Ed

1 rd ! trd -.Y.

ENDING
THURSDAY

Matinees: 1 :15 and 3:50
Evenings: 6:30 and 9:00
Prices: Matinees $1.25
Nights and Sunday $1 .50
IMCentury fo
prtset.
1 r:
sa Metv

* I
.1
*1
* U
*1

:; .
: , .
_.<.:<. .
:; .
:.> .
Y
;

COLOR BY BE LIX
CINEMASCOPE

THIS FRIDAY NIGHT!
First Concert of 1966
The 18-piece
U of M JAZZ BAND
* CONCERT: 8:30 P.M., HILL
LECTURE: 7:00 P.M., HILL
Nat Hentoff, noted jazz critic and author
DON' TMISS EITHER OF
THESE EXCITING EVENTS!
FREE-sponsored by UAC and The School of Music

*
FEB. 16& 17th
"OTHELLO"

11

K

I

I

UAC's
MUSKET '66
presents
WEST
STORY
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
February 9-10-1 1-12
Individual Ticket Sales
February 1-12
TICKETS AVAILABLE
MUSKET offices
WArIIfAN I I AtIE

III *5.au 114

I

I

~,o.e'U U U K ~ff if,. U

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan