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February 01, 1966 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-02-01

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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1960

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 196U THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE ThREE

Congress Backs Presi
Moscow, Peking Hlit.A

dent;)
_..

MILITARY APPRAISAL:
Johnson Avoids Broadening
War Scope, Limits Targets

World Views
U .S* Policy
In Viet Nan
Britain Gives Support;
Russia Terms Raids
Escalated Aggression
LONDON VP)-Moscow and Pe-
king reacted angrily yesterday to
the renewed U.S. air raids on
North Viet Nam. But in the West.
Britain gave full support to Wash-
ington's decision, saying Hanoi
9 had laid down an impossible con-
dition Sunday for peace talks.
The Soviet government issued a
statement saying resumption of
bombing of the North "shows that
the United States actually does
not want the war in Viet Nam to
end." It called the U.S. peace of-
fensive "a diplomatic move aimed
at misleading worldpublic opinion
and preparing the ground for
further escalation of aggression."
Tass
The Soviet news agency Tass
said President Johnson's decision
means he has "followed the advice
of the most warlike and militarist
quarters in the United States.
Said Radio Peking: "U.S. im-
perialism, after, the utter failure
of its peace hoax, recklessly re-
sumed its bombings."
1k North Viet Nam declared: "The
resumption of the air strikes once
again divulged the Johnson peace
offensive was a fraud."
A Vatican source said Pope
Paul VI expressed disappointment
that the bombings were resumed
after his appeal last week for UN
arbitration in Viet Nam but still
hopes his request "may lead to the
establishment of permanent peace
in Southeast Asia."
Canada
In Ottawa, Prime Minister Les-
ter B. Pearson of Canada said
his government had hoped the
bombing pause might be continued
on the possibility there might be
some softening of North Viet
Nam's position. He told the House
of Commons he was informed of
the U.S. decision Sunday.
The British government, in a
strong Foreign Office statement,
said President Ho Chi Minh of
North Viet Nam had laid down
an unacceptable condition that
the Viet Cong should be "the 'sole
genuine representative" of the
South Vietnamese people at any
peace conference. The statement
said a message relayed from Ho
through Moscow to Queen Eliza-
beth Monday said:
"If the United States really
wants peace it must recognize the
South Vietnamese Front for Lib-
eration (political arm of the Viet
Cong) as the sole genuine repre-
sentative of the people of South
Viet Nam."
Previously the Communists had
held .out merely for Liberation
Front representation at the peace
table. .

WASHINGTON OP)-Resumption
of the bombing of North Viet Nam i
yesterday had a this-is-where-we-
came-in air about it as President
Johnson carefully avoided any
Sdramaticbroadening of the air
" " war's scope.
nThetargets hit by Air Force:
and Navy fighter-bombers were
in the same general areas and
of the same nature as those at-
Tn Congress tacked by the first raiders nearly
12 months ago.
Those targets were bridges,
R e warehouses, storage facilities, and
truck convoys in the Vihn and
Dong Hoi regions just above the
UN Move Praised demilitarized zone s e p a r a t i n g
North Viet Nam and South Viet
But Little Chance Nam.
Seen forSuPentagon sources described the
een for Success kickoff attack Monday as light,
WASHINGTON (A')-The re- Iprobably because of adverse wea-
sumption of bombing of North ther conditions.
Viet Nam Monday brought a call The loss of a Navy plane to
by the senior Republican senator ground fire indicated the enemy
for the United States to shift to had concentrated antiaircraft bat-
a full wartime footing-with a teries there during the 37-day lull.
universal draft, higher taxes and "We're easing in gently," said
economic controls. one military official.
Sen. George D. Aiken of Ver- Another knowledgeable Penta-
mont told the Senate that unless gon source suggested the pattern
the danger is far less than it now of attacks in the immediate fu-
appears there is no sense in Presi- ture at least may involve a lower
dent Johnson "waiting until after level of target than just before
the election to recommend the the lull began, but heavier strikes
inevitable." Waiting, he declared, at these targets in terms of more
"is just another attempt to lull planes and bombs.
the people." During the lull which began
Johnson's order resuming the Dec. 24, some members of Con-
bombings touched off a lengthy gress and others urged that when
Senate debate. It indicated solid the air strikes were renewed the
support for the President's move target areas be broadened to in-
but there were some expressions clude ports, power plants ,and
of regret that he felt he had to
take this step. I
No Choice
Generally the sentiment was * TH
that the President had no other *OF T
choice in view of the negative
Communist response to his peace
efforts and the need to protect
American troops from a Red
buildup under sanctuary.
The President's decision to ask
help of the United Nations to
bring the Viet Nam conflict to the
negotiating table also got solid
support in Congress.
Among those who praised this
action were most of the 16 senators
who had sent him a letter urging
a continuation of the bombing
lull.

factories-and perhaps even the
capital, Hanoi.
But President Johnson indicated
in his broadcast report to the na-
tion that the target objectives
probably will continue to be limit-
ed mainly to the infiltration
routes.
He stressed, too, that "Our air
strikes in North Viet Nam from
the beginning, have been aimed at!
military targets and have been
controlled with the greatest of
care."
There was speculation that the
President would keep the targets
at a relatively low level-and that
he is underscoring the tight con-
trol-in a bid to encourage the
North Vietnamese to have second
thoughts about negotiating
Secretary of State Dean Rusk,
at a news conference following the
President's report, said the bomb-
ing level is "approximately where
we were in December" when the
lull began.
Military sources disputed this,
noting that by degrees as the
air war progressed last year U.S.
warplanes were ranging far to the
north and hitting such targets as
power plants.
It also was noted that some of
the raids came very close to
China's borders and within 17
miles of Haiphong, North Viet
Nam's chief port.
Haiphong and Hanoi have been
exempt from U.S. bombing so far'
and there is no indication that
this will change in the immediate
future.
Military sources reported a sig-

These sources said that the
line of communication has been
rebuilt to a considerable extent,
with railroads and bridges and
highways repaired; the pipeline
of men and equipment had been
reconstituted to a large extent,
as shown by reconnaissance pic-
tures of heavy truck convoys mov-
ing southward in broad daylight
during the pause.
The Vinh and Dong Hoi areas,
which were worked over repeat-
edly starting in the early months
of the air war last year, are con-
sidered vital supply and stock-
piling points along the line of
communication leading south.
Another reason for hitting in
this area, it was said, could be to
knock out once agai nradar in-
stallations which have been used
to warn areas further north that
American parties are on the way.
Most of this radar had been
reported destroyed before the lull.
Johnson said he gave "proper
weight to the judgment" of all
responsible advisers, including the
Joint Chiefs of Staff.
Although they undoubtedly went
along with the resumption at a
relatively low level of targeting,
there is strong reason to believe
that from a military standpoint
they would prefer an escalation of
targets to include port facilities,
oil supplies, power plants,. air
fields and railroad yards in the
Hanoi-Haiphong area and else-
where.

nificant reconstruction
up in North Viet Nam
lull.

and build-
during the

-Associated Press
THE U.S. AIR FORCE released this photo in Saigon yesterday. It shows a bombing raid by'U.S.
planes over North Viet Nam immediately prior to the cessation of the air strikes Dec. 24. The United
States yesterday announced the resumption of round-the-clock bombing runs.
NOT PEACE MOVE:
Lull in Viet Cong Attacks
Assessed as Regular Event

SAIGON (MP)-The recent lull in
Viet Cong attacks is considered
a regular occurrence, not a reac-
tion to the American peace of-
fensive or international pressure
for peace.
Knowledgeable observers here
and American and Vietnamese
intelligence operatives point out
that a similar lull occurred last
January, and also in January 1964.
The pattern of Viet Cong war-

fare has not changed since the,
Viet Nam war moved into full
gear early in 1963. The Viet Cong
slash out at vulnerable targets for
a couple of months and then pull
back into the jungles.
During 1964 there were several
lulls in the fighting. The Viet
Cong always came back with
greater intensity. Intelligence in-
formation indicates that the Viet
Cong, backed by increasing num-

World News Roundup

By The Associated Press
LONDON-Britain's opposition
Conservatives charged yesterday
that Prime Minister Harold Wil-
son is blocking an "honorable
settlement in Rhodesia."
Wilson immediately challenged
the Conservatives to present a
motion of censure on the Labor,
government's policy designed to
end rebellion in the central Afri-
can colony.
The bitter exchange between
Wilson and Conservative leader
Edward Heath came during the
prime minister's announcement in
the House of Commons of a total
embargo on trade with Rhodesia..
It threatened gravely the bi-
partisan approach to efforts at
ending the rebellion which has
been in existence since Rhodesia
seized independence.
The total trade embargo was
made public in a Board of Trade
announcement Sunday.

CHICAGO - The government's
effort to prove fraud and con-
spiracy in promotion of Krebiozen
collapsed entirely yesterday when'
a jury repeated its acquittal ver-
dicts for the final two defendants.
Dr. Stevan Durovic, developer
of the drug, and the Krebiozen
Research 'Foundation he heads
were found not guilty. The seven
women and five men jurors had
listened to nine months of testi-
mony and deliberated 47 hours
and 50 minutes in reaching the
final verdict.
The jury Saturday had freed
Dr. Andrew C. Ivy, 72, phsiologist
who was chief medical backer of
the drug; Marko Durovic, 65, law-
yer and brother of the doctor
acquitted Monday, and Dr. William

bers of North Vietnamese troops
are preparing for a new series of
attacks against isolated district
towns, Vietnamese battalions and
regiments and maybe some Ameri-
can base areas.
There appears to be no good
reason for North Vietnamese Pres-
ident Ho Chi Minh to have called
off his troops to gain some ad-
vantage in world politics.
Ho could be expected to follow
up any deliberate scaledown in
the war with a hint to some third
party of what he was doing. There
has been no word or sign that'
the North Vietnamese leader has
any intention of altering the mo-
mentum of the war.
Recent intelligence information
indicates that the scale of Com-
munist infiltration into South
Viet Nam is continuing as before,
with more than 3,000 North Viet-
namese troops coming across the
border each month.
Observers see no reason why
these North Vietnamese units
should immediately plunge into
battle. The strategy of "hit when
the enemy is weak, disperse when
he is strong," has been applied
almost unvaryingly over the years
by the Viet Cong.
There seems little doubt that
the big American buildup in Viet
Nam, with the possibility of many
more new troops arriving, has
given the Viet Cong and Ho Chi
Minh plenty of food for thought.
The Americans are occupying

E CADETS AN]
HE UNIVERSI
40th AN
)LD
IDEI
MI LITAR
UARY 12, 9-1,
YMPHONY IN S
EN MAC KENZ II
ATIONALS
Military Personne
.s ~ ~ .22. .J...

Majority Whip
The Senate Democratic whip,
Sen. Russell B. Long of Louisiana,
said:
"I fear we are in for a rather
frustrating experience. Any resolu-
tion we might get to uphold us
in the Security Council will be
vetoed by the Soviet Union. And,
if the General Assembly should
pass a resolution on our side, the
Communists will not abide by it."

*
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FEBR
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2 P.M.... LEAGUE
WING
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l and Guests Invited

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F. P. Phillips, a general practioner areas long the sole preserve of the
who prescribed Krebiozen for some Viet Cong in a bold policy of
cancer sufferers. taking the fight to the enemy.
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for
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