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January 23, 1966 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-23

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 23, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

SUNDAY, JANUARY 23, 1966 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

- # S; Viii 1t#aVL1/

d

Wheeler
Bombing

ssNorth

ro

Resume

Speculate on Moro Return;
Fanfani Demands Change

By The Associated Prest
WASHINGTON-As the tatter-
ed lunar new year truce entered
its final hours yesterday, Senators
made public a vigorous plea by
the nation's top military leader,
Gen. Earle G. Wheeler, to resume
bombing of North Viet Nam.
"If you stop bombing North
Viet Nam, in effect you throw
one of your blue chips for nego-
tiation over your shoulder," the
chairman of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff told a closed session of the
Senate Armed Services and Ap-
propriations committees.
President Johnson ordered a
halt to the bombing of North Viet
Nam 30 days ago in an attempt
to induce North Vietnamese and
Viet Cong leaders to negotiate for
a cease-fire or peace.
Panels
Sen. Richard B. Russell (D-Ga),
chairman of the two Senate panels
who have been listening to secret
testimony, by the general and
Secretary of Defense Robert S.
McNamara, made public the tes-
timony with Wheeler's permission.
Wheeler appeared before the
committees on Thursday and Fri-
day.
Gavin
His advocacy of bombing of
North Viet Nam came when he
was asked about proposals by
James Gavin, retired general and
former ambassador, that the U.S.
halt bombing and offensive war-
fare in South Viet Nam and with-
draw its forces to a group of
military enilaves or centers which
could be stoutly defended.
Wheeler disagreed with this
concept, which he said had been
examined and rejected by U.S.
planners.
Three Chips
"We have, from a military point
of view, three blue chips when it
comes to negotiations," he said.
"One of them is the bombing of
North Viet Nam; the second is
the deployment of the United
States and third-country (other
nations) forces into South Viet
Nam; and the third is the pros-
pective withdrawal, under appro-
priate circumstances, of our forces
and third-country forces.
Withdrawal
On the subject of withdrawing

to coastal strongpoints, Wheeler
said, "One objection is that to do
so would be to surrender the ini-
tiative, to the enemy. In other
words, the rest of the country out-
side of your enclaves would be
his to do with as he saw fit.
"I believe very firmly that un-
der such circumstances the enemy
would be able to concentrate
against any chosen point. He
would attack either with mortars,
artillery, or any way he saw fit
and inflict very substantial losses
on us, with very little loss in re-
turn to his own forces.
Lose Support
"Under such circumstances, I
believe that it would only be a'
matter of time until we would
lose the active fighting support
of the South Vietnamese ,forces.
In effect, I believe that this would
be to give South Viet Nam to the
North Vietnamese."
If the bombing was stopped and
troops withdrawn to enclaves,
Wheeler said "there would be very
little point in a negotiation. I
think the country would be going
down the drain before you ever
got a negotiation going."
Renewed Attacks
The administration's peace of-
fensive has apparently failed to
open any doors to negotiations.
President Johnson is expected to
decide next week whether to re-
sume the bombing in North Viet
Nam.
Secretary of State Dean Rusk
said Friday that he expects large-
scale renewal of Communist at-
tacks after the Sunday end of
the imperfectly observed lunar
new year truce.
Chance To Rebuild
Wheeler's civilian chief, Secre-
tary of Defense Robert S. Mc-
Namara, said Friday the inter-
ruption of the bombing had given
the North Vietnamese a chance
to rebuild bombed-out bridges,
roads and communication lines.
But McNamara said this was "a'
small cost to pay" to demonstrate
to the world "our desire for peace
and our desire for negotiations."
In Saigon, Sen. Jack Miller (D-
Iowa) called for massive assaults
to "break the back of the enemy's
logistics system in North Viet
Nam."

ROME (OP) - In the midst of
speculation that Aldo Moro would
succeed himself as premier to end
Italy's current government crisis,
Amintore Fanfani declared yes-
terday he is ready to enter a new
cabinet.
But Fanfani, who quit as Moro's
foreign minister last month in
the dispute over a political friend's
peace feeler from Hanoi, served'
notice that the next government
would have to be drastically dif-
ferent.
Fanfani took his stand as
Christian Democrat party leaders
convened in emergency session to
thrash out their differences after
a party revolt forced Moro to quit
Friday.

Moro's center-left coalition by
voting against a government
nursery school bill in a secret
ballot in Parliament two nights
ago.
There was speculation that fol-
lowers of Fanfani, who has long
been Moro's main competitor in
the party, did the sniping to help
open the way for Fanfani to re-
turn as premier. He has been pre-
mier four times in the past and
since his resignation as foreign
minister has called for a govern-
ment reshuffle.
In an emotion-charged speech
yesterday, Fanfani denied any
connection with the snipers. He
called their action "disgusting,"
and proposed an end 'to the prac-
tice of secret votes that enable
Parliament members to betray
party discipline under such cover.
But he did not back down on
Hi Fi STUDIO
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his demands for a radical party
and government shakeup. He said
he was asking for a thorough
clarification "that would achieve
efforts" in the center-left govern-
ment.
This was taken to mean that
Fanfani, long a darling of the
Socialists and Democratic Social-
ists serving with the Christian
Democrats and Republicans in the
coalition, wanted more leftwing
Christian Democrats like himself
in the cabinet and fewer ministers
from the party's center and far
right.
Keep Formula
His words made it plain he
would oppose any change in the
center-left formula which he him-
self devised and which Moro has
headed since 1963. Only Commun-
ists and far rightists have called
for an end to that lineup.
TV RENTALS
LOWEST RATES
STUDENT SPECIALS
HIFl STUDIO
1319 S. Univ. NO 3-7242

Snipers
Party snipers helped

defeat

Labor Party
To Gamble
On Election
HULL, England (R) - Britain's
Labor government virtually lays
its life on the line next week in a
special parliamentary election that
swings on the opinions of a few
hundred voters in this port city.
If Labor loses the election
Thursday, its House of Commons
majority will be cut to one vote.
Prime Minister Harold Wilson
could decide to soldier on with
practically no parliamentary re-
serves, or call a new election.
Either would be a gamble.
The Labor candidate, Kevin Mc-
Namara, a law lecturer at Hull
University, is the slight favorite,
but a drop in Labor's support in
the national opinion polls this
week makes the outcome any-
body's guess.
McNamara's campaign is haunt-
ed by a red-bearded Independent
Radical candidate, Richard Gott,
27. A journalist, he is running on
a platform assailing Wilson's sup-
port for U.S. policy in Viet Nam.
He could shave off enough nor-
mally Labor votes to give the seat
to the Conservatives.
Parliament resumes Tuesday af-
ter the Christmas recess with a
full schedule of proposed legisla-
tion-the annual tax and revenue
bill, a bill to set up a commission
to handle vacant building land
and a proposal to make unions
give advance warning of wage
demands.

m

Special Retreat for College Men
St. Paul of the Cross Retreat House
23333 Schoolcraft, Detroit
A weekend of rest, discussion, fun, spiritual
rejuvenation, and mental relaxation.
Fri., Feb. 4, 6:30 P.M. 'til Sun., Feb. 6, 4:00 P.M.
Write or call KE 5-9563 for information
and/or reservations.

"Hurry up with that ammo . . .
IMPORTANT STEP:
Departure of Rebel Leaders
Eases Dominican Tensions

The Board in Control of Student Publications
wants to meet with all those interested in
PETITIONING
for the Senior Staff of the
MICHIGANENSIAN

Wednesday, January 26

8 P.M.

SANTO DOMINGO (M)-An im-
portant step toward the pacifi-
cation of this gravely troubled
country was taken yesterday with
the departure of the principal
figures in the Dominican rebel
movement.
Leading the group of four rebel
officers thiat left at noon for dip-
lomatic posts was Col. Francisco
Caamano Deno, 33, president of
the rebel constitutionalist regime
until its dissolution in early Sep-
tember, when the provisional gov-
ernment was installed. Col. Ca-
amano has been named military
attache in London.
The other three and their dip-
lomatic assignments were: , Lt.
Col. Manuel Ramon Montes Ar-
ache, rebel army commander, to
Ottawa; Lt. Col. Mario Pena Ta-
veras, member of the original
group of young officers that
launched the April revolt, to San-
tiago, Chile; and Capt. Hector
Lachapelle Diaz, rebel chief of
staff, to Brussels.
Ease Tensions
Their departure was in com-
pliance with a presidential order
issued last Jan. 6 transferring
abroad 34 officers from the rival
camps in the April revolt. It was
a move to ease military tensions
that two weeks ago brought the
provisional government to the

brink of a coup d'etat in anotherI
boiling up of the prolonged Do-
minican crisis.
Before departing, Col. Caamano
told newsmen he was' leaving as
a military man complying with
an order from civilian authority.
He said he had been assured by
the government of the security
and welfare of the members of
the rebel force remaining behind.
He also, said he had received
promises that the remaining
rebels would be integrated into
the regular armed forces.
Before departing, the four top
leaders called on President Hec-
tor Garcia-Godoy at his residence.
Asked later if he felt the move
meant the end of the crisis, the
president replied in the affirma-
tive. Asked when he felt the regu-
lar army leaders would go, he
smiled and said, "You'll soon
know."
The group was taken to the
U.S. Army helipad near the Hotel
Embajador from where they were
lifted to International Airport and
boarded a plane for San Juan,
Puerto Rico, and connections for
flights to Europe and New York.
Army guards turned back scores of
rebel sympathizers who tried to
watch the four leave.
The president made his decision
to ship the most controversial mil-

itary figures out of the country
after the turmoil kicked up by a
violent clash last Dec. 19 between
army regulars and rebel fighters
in the interior city 'of Santiago.
Spotlight
Less than 900 members of the
rebel leaders swung the crisis
spotlight to the regular army of-
ficers affected by the presidential
order, which reshuffles the high
command and sends abroad the
present armed forces minister,
Commodore Francisco J. Rivera
Caminero and his Air Force and
Army chiefs of staff.
Commodore Rivera Caminero
reiterated that the Superior Mili-
tary Council would consider the
presidential order next week. The
council consists of the Air Force,
Army and Navy chiefs of staff
and their three subchiefs.
Delay .
It appeared almost certain any
prolonged delay by the regular
army in complying with the pres-
ident's order would arouse ad-
verse reaction from left-wing na-
tionalists and the extreme left,
who have been threatening wide-
spread strikes and violence if the
military chiefs fail to leave.
Commodore Rivera Caminero
has been appointed naval .attache
in Washington, a position he occu-
pied from 1962 to 1963.
The Air Force chief of staff,
Gen. Juan de los Santos Cespedes,
and the Army chief of staff, Gen.
Jacinto Martinez Arana were
named military attaches' in Israel
and Buenos Aires, respectively.
- Succeeds
The present Navy chief of staff,
Commodore Ramon Emilio Jim-
enez, 40, has been appointed to
succeed Rivera Caminero.
Twenty-two lesser regular army
officers were to go to Israel on
a conservation study tour.
ELECTRONIC
DESK TOP
CALCULATOR
FIRST SHOWING
IN THE
ANN ARBOR AREA!
I The Victor Electronic Calcula-
Stor will be on display and dem-
onstrated to University Person-

UNIVERSITY LECTURES IN JOURNALISM
CHARLES W. FERGUSON
Senior Editor, "The Reader's Digest"
Author of "Naked to Mine Enemies,"
"Say it with Words"
will speak on:
Reading as a Metaphysical Experience
Tuesday, January 25 RACKHAM
at 3 P.M. AMPHITHEATRE
PUBLIC CORDIALLY INVITED
This advertisement paid for by the University Press Club of Michigan

11

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BUILDING
Anyone here for three semesters is
eligible to apply, so everyone come!

H HILLEL
SUPPER CLUB
Delicatessen, etc.
5:30 P.M., Sundays 75c affiliates
See Chellie $1.00 others

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PETITIONING NOW OPEN
(closes at noon, Tuesday, Jan. 25)

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for the'-

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wanted
PAID SUBJECTS
with
ACNE
for study of treatment
Involves treatment of one side
of face for a 4-8 week period
with the object of finding out
how valuable several time-hon-
ored treatments really are. If
comparison shows treatment to
be effective, we will then treat
the other side and you will have
learned something useful about
caring for acne. There is also
a lump payment at the end of
period. Any type of acne is
appropriate, but you must have
enough to work with. Male
subjects are preferred.

MEMBERSHIP TRIBUNAL

MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE

and

of

Student Government Council

[POLLETTI

r

World News, Roundup

GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe

If interested, write name,
phone, address, and age on a
card and mail to: Acne
Therapy Study, Dept. of Der-
matology, U of M Medical
Center. If suitable, we will
contact you shortly.

Cal l 663-0553 or stop
Room 1546 SAB

in

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To Arrange

Interview Date

By The Associated Press
LAGOS, Nigeria-Prime !Minis-
ter Sir Abubakar Tafawa Balewa,
missing since the outset of an
army revolt a week ago has been
found dead, the Information Min-
istry reported yesterday. The an-
nouncement didknot say when or
how Sir~ Abubakar died. He was
54.
NEW DELHI, India-India and
Pakistan began exchanging mili-
tary prisoners yesterday and
agreed on a plan for withdrawing
their armies from the cease-fire
line where fighting halted Sept. 23.
MOSCOW-The Russians prom-
ised yesterday to perform an
autopsy on the body of Newcomb
Mott and said an American of-
ficial could be present during the
post-mortem examination in Mos-
cow tomorrow.

BIRMINGHAM, Ala.-The rul-
ing body of the Democratic party
in Alabama abandoned its "white
supremacy"~ motto ye st er da y
rather than risk the threatened
loss of Negro votes in this year's
elections.
Despite angry cries from states
righters who demanded a record
vote, the State Democratic Execu-
tive Committee struck the white
supremacy slogan from the offi-
cial party emblem on a voice
ballot.
LOS ANGELES-A California
advisory committee said Saturday
the Governor's Commission report
on the Watts riots is "a bitter dis-
appointment" that "prescribes
aspirin where surgery is required."
"The report is elementary, su-
perficial, unoriginal and unimag-
itiP" caulthe Caornia Ad-

Sunday, Jan. 23, 7:00-8:15 P.M.
(continuing for 7 weeks)
Study and Discussion of
Harvey Cox'
"THE SECULAR CITY"
Sampling of areas covered: The Shape of the Secular
City-The Style of the Secular City--The Secular City
in Cross-Cultural Perspective-The BiblicalSource of
Secularism-Work and Plays in the Secular City-
Sex and Secularization-etc.

0

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1000 to 2000 WORDS A MINUTE
WITH FULL COMPREHENSION & RETENTION
EASE PRESSURE -SAVE TIME - IMPROVE CONCENTRATION

You can read 150-200 pages an hour using the ACCELERATED READING method.
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excellent.
This is NOT a skimming method; you definitely read every word.
You can apply the ACCELERATED READING method to textbooks and factual mate-
rial as well as to literature and fiction. The author's style is not lost when you read at these
speeds. In fact, your accuracy and enjoyment in reading will be increased.
Consider what this new reading ability will enable you to accomplish-in your required
reading and in the additional reading you want to do.
No machines, projectors, or apparatus are used in learning the ACCELERATED READ-
ING method. Thus the reader avoids developing any dependence upon external equipment in
reading.
An afternoon class and an evening class in ACCELERATED READING will be taught
each TUESDAY adjacent to the U. of M. campus, beginning on February 15.
Be our guest at a 30-minute public DEMONSTRATION of the ACCELERATED READ-

GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe I

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