100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 23, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

CTT nAV fAYVTTA'PV=OQ IGA&.

tT?.,TTJA~7T AIT!AKY ZS, 1966

Common Market Crisis Seen;
Franee Issues New Demands

Windowless Rooms
For Future Classes?

MATH, ENGLISH MAJORS:
Grads Sought To Teach In
Southern Summer Program

LUXEMBOURG ' W) - France's
five Common Market partners fear
that many more months of serious
crisis lie ahead for the European
Economic Community unless Pres-
ident Charles de Gaulle's govern-
ment is willing to make some con-
cessions.
Delegates privately expressed
concern over the future of Euro-
pean unity after a two-day meet-
ing that ended in disagreement
on a French proposal that most
of them viewed -as more of an
ultimatum.

French Foreign Minister Maur-
ice Couvre de Murville made an
offer of limited cooperation with
the other five members, provided
they agree:
1) That each member retain a
veto on major questions.
2) That steps be taken to trim
the powers of the market's Execu-
tive Commission, which de Gaulle
fears may turn into a super-
government.
The ministers, agreed to *meet
again Jan. 28-29 for another try,
but it was felt success or failure

Students See Picketing As
Only Hope To Gain Goals

(Continued from Page 1)
don't have enough power unless
we have widespread support from
the state's citizens,' he said.
Eric Chester, '66, chairman of
VOICE, said after Friday's Regents
meeting that if the administra-
tion refuses to open communica-
tion channels, students will have
to rely on demonstrations to open
them. He indicated that such
demonstrations might include sit-
ins at Regents' meetings, though
he said that he was in no posi-
tion to predict that this kind of
action would definitely come
about.
Bluestone said that "perhaps
Eric is right; we may have to re-
sort to other means. Maybe it will
be necessary to, have wide-spread
demonstrations. It may be a good
thing to encourage 200 students
to attend a Regents meeting and
not let the Regents leave until

they hear what students have to
say. Maybe that's the kind of ac-
tion it will take to shake up eight
old people."
He added that besides encour-
aging citizens to send telegrams to
'Regents relating approval of
bookstore plans and other eco-
nomic reforms, the citizens might
even be urged to come to Regents'
meetings themselves.
However, Eisenberg felt doubt-
ful that many students could be
induced to demonstrate for eco-
nomic reforms, due to the high
economic level of most of the stu-
dent body. Students testifying be-
fore Rep. Jack Faxon's (D-De-
troit) Subcommittee on Higher'
Education of the House Commit-
tee on Ways and Means last fall
cited figures to show that the Uni-
versity's students are the "eco-
nomic elite" and that the median
income of student's families is
$13,000,per year.

depends largely on how much lati-
tude de Gaulle will allow Couvre
de Murville.
Premier Pierre Werner of Lux-
embourg will report Thursday to
the European Parliament in Stras-
bourg on the ministers' failure to
solve the six-month-old crisis re-
sulting from France's boycott of
the community's meetings.
The report is certain to bring
unfavorable reaction in the Stras-
bourg assembly, most of whose
members have always pushed for
an integrated Europe.
Prepare Report
Permanent representatives of
the other five Common Market
members-West Germany, Italy,
the Netherlands, Belgium and
Luxembourg-worked today on the
report Werner will present in
Strasbou;g. French representative
Jean-Marc Boegner was recalled
to Paris last July when France
began its boycott.
A number of delegates from
other countries complained that
de Gaulle wants to set up a time-
table for action on things he
wants without taking into con-
sideration the wishes of the other
partners. Couvre de Murville pro-
posed a list of deadlines for
settling the Common Market farm
policy and agreement on the
makeup of a new Executive Com-
mission to be enlarged from 9 to
14 members.
France has made clear it wants
to replace the members of the
present Executive Commission
with others who have no political
influence. The chief French target
is the chairman of the present
commission, Walter Hallstein of
West Germany.

Do children in a windowless
classroom learn more or less than
children who have conventional
classroom light and ventilation?
They seem to learn equally well
in either situation, according to
University of Michigan research-
ers.
This is the main finding of a
three-year experiment in the
Wayne Community Schools where
children, kindergarten through
third grade, spent a full year in
a windowless building.
Their school work and health
was comparable to that of a con-
trol group in a nearby school, ac-
cording to C. Theodore Larson,
U-M professor of architecture who
directed the experiment.
Control Group
The experiment at the Hoover
School, a four room primary unit
in Wayne, was begun in 1962. The
children in the similar Mann
School nearby were used as a
control group.
The construction of the Hoover
School permitted the windows to
be easily eliminated by simply sub-
stituting opaque wall panels for
the transparent panels. The exist-
ing windows were completely seal-
ed off for one school year. Dur-
ing this time both the children's
schoolwork and their health were
carefully watched. After windows
were restored and observation of
the children was continued.
"Absence of windows made no
detectable difference," Larson says.
"The Hoover children's perform-
ance was just about the same re-
gardless of the windows and their
performance was similar to the
Mann school children's."
Reaction
How did the children react at
first to the lack of windows?
"They didn't mind at all. They
weren't even aware that the win-
dows had been eliminated during
the summer vacation. Nor did they
become at all excited about look-
ing out of the windows when this
was again possible," says Larson.
One positive finding that does
emerge from the Hoover School
experiment is the remarkable shift
in the teachers 'attitude. There
is no question as to their prefer-

ence for windowless classrooms
once they have had the experience
of teaching in such an environ-
ment.
"They are unanimous in their
reasons for not wanting the win-
dows. The children are no longer
distracted by outside happenings
when the classrooms become win-
dowless ,and besides the extra
wall space can be put to good in-
structional use."
Larson notes that several edu-
cators have questioned whether
the elimination of outside dis-
tractions is always something to
be desired.
"An exterior happening may
now and then provide a fruitful
stimulus to learning activity in
the classroom, particularly if the
class-as in the case of kinder-
gartners-does not have a strict
set of learning tasks. However,
most school work has a definite
educational focus and relatively
few classrooms would find win-
dows an advantage here."
Windows Obsolete?
"Only the- viewing function
keeps windows from becoming
completely obsolete but windows
designed solely as 'eyes' to the out-
side environment, if they are to
be fully effective, obviously should
be quite different in shape and
size and location from the tra-
ditional window designs.
"Ideally, they should be ports
or apertures to permit building
occupants to have a view of the
outside"," he says. "Even scan-
ning devices of the sort used in
closed-circuit TV systems con-
ceivably might do the trick."
Larson's experiment was financ-
ed by the Educational Facilities
Laboratories, an organisation cre-
ated by the Ford Foundation and
devoted to improving school build-
ings. ,
"We really have very little re-
search on architecture for schools
or homes or offices," Larson says.
"We know that the environment
in which man lives and works af-
fects him but we don't' know,
how. Today we can design the
environment we want. The sad
fact is we don't know what is
best for us."

By CLARENCE FANTO
The Southern Teaching Pro-
gram, Inc., now in itsthird year
of operation, is again offering
summer positions in predominant-
ly Negro or integrated Southern
colleges. Students with one year
of graduate study, preferably in
the fields of mathematics and'
English will be considered for
placement.
The organization, a non-profit
educational group also offers full-
year placement for holders of
master's degrees.
Replace Regular Faculty
The graduate students in the
summer program are primarily
used to replace regular faculty)
members who are on leave, or
to supplement the school's staff
in order to schedule special rem-
edial programs for incoming fresh-
men,
Last year ,almost 150 graduate
students taught in 27, colleges.
They were recruited from the Uni-
PH. 483-4680
n renCRENTER RODB
FREE IN-CAR HEATERS
ENDS TONIGHT
CHARITON
HESTON mW
RICHARD di5LOIUD
TECHNICOLOR@
BOONEAVIS ION@
ALSO
aB ALLIED ARTISTS
release
EARLY BIRD SHOW
BOX OFFICE OPEN 5:30-

TONIGHT at '7 and 9 P -M
I I
J EAN COCT EAU'S
k Buau
A remOrkably beautiful and movinfm
I 9
Shodt: H ubley s "The H, -le
, V o i c e b y D i z z y G i l l e s p i e ' a 7
JIN THE ARCHITECTURE AUDITOIUM
Ia
AIDM1$S1N: PIFTY CENTI
a rr rir rrr r rr rr r d r seiwr r: rIr r

versity of California,, Columbia,
Harvard, M.I.T., the University of
Virginia, and Yale as well as
Michigan. The graduate students
become employes of the colleges
to which they are assigned, not
of the Southern Teaching Pro-
gram, Inc.
Carnegie Corporation Support
The program has been support-
ed by the Carnegie Corporation
as well as other foundations.
Graduate students in the sum-
mer program receive a minimum

salary of $50 per week plus room
and board at the colleges and
round-trip transportation.
Enthusiasm has been reported
as high among participants in
the program, according to a pro-
fessor at the University of Vir-
ginia, who conducted a survey
which also commended the goals
and aims of the project.
Further information can be se-
cured by calling Herb Lyon or
Charles Holmes at 662-9616 be-
tween 4 and 5 p.m.

w

.. {

The Week To Come: A Cmpus Caendar

r

4
*

SUNDAY, JAN. 23
8:30 p.m.-University Chamber
Choir and Chamber Orchestra
p r e s e n t s Schoenberg's "Vier
Stucke," Opus 27 with Thomas
Hilbish conducting, in Hill Aud.
MONDAY, JAN. 24
4 p.m.-PTP presents a lecture-
demonstration with Arthur Mitch-
ell and Patricia Neary, New York
City Ballet Company on "Ballet
Balanchine" at Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre. ,
8:30 p.m. - PTP will present
"Abbence of a Cello" at Hill Aud.
TUESDAY, JAN. 25
8 a.m.-Ann Arbor Goals Con-
ference registration in the Michi-
gan Union.
3 p.m.-The journalism depart-
ment will present Charles W. Fer-
guson, senior editor of "Reader's
Digest," speaking on "Reading as
a Metaphysical Experience" at the
Rackham Amphitheatre.
8 p.m.-PTP presents ACT in
Moliere's "Tartuffe" at Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m-The School of Music
presents the University Woodwind
Quintet in Rackham Lecture Hall.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 26
4 pan.-A Department of Zool-
ogy Seminar presents C. R. Aus-
tin of Tulane University on
"Mechanisms of Sperm Entry in-
to Eggs," at 1400 Chemistry Bldg.
7:30 p.m.-The college of engi-
neering presents Brice Carnahan
of the departments of chemical
engineering and biostatistics,
speaking on "An Introduction to
Digital Computers and the MAD
Language" in the Natural Science
'Aud.
8 p.m.-PTP presents ACT in
Moliere's "Tartuffe" at Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-The School of Music
presents the Stanley Quartet in
Rackham Lecture Hall.
THURSDAY, JAN. 27
2:15 p.m.-Mental Health Re-
search Institute presents James
Olds of' the psychology depart-
nent speaking on "Chemical
HURRY LAST DAYS
Shows at 1:30-4:00-6:30 & 9:05
Weekday Matinee-$1.25
Evenings & Sunday-$1.50
IF YOU HAVE ONLY SEEN
IT ONCE, YOU HAVEN'T
SEEN IT AT ALL
THE BIGGEST BOND
OF ALL

Stimulation of the Hypothala-
mus" in 1057 MHRI.
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild
presents Kurosawa's "The Drunk-
en Angel" in the Architecture
Aud.
7:30 p.m--Lubomir Dolozel will
speak on "The Prague School
and the Theory of Poetic Lan-
guage" in the Rackham Amphi-
theatre.
8 p.m.-PTP presents ACT in
Moliere's "Tartuffe" at Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
FRIDAY, JAN. 28
7 and 9 p.m. - Cinema Guild
presents Kurosawa's "The Drunk-
en Angel" in the Architecture
Aud.
8 p.m.-PTP presents ACT in
Moliere's "Tartuffe" at Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.

11 p.m.-PTP special late show
presents ACT in Samuel Beckett's
"Endgame" at Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
SATURDAY, JAN. 29
2:30 and 8 p.m.--PTP presents
ACT in Moliere's "Tartuffe" at
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
7 and 9 p.m. - Cinema Guild
presents Antonioni's "Eclipse" in
the Architecture Aud.
11 p.m.--PTP special late show
presents ACT in Samuel Beckett's
"Endgame" in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
SUNDAY, JAN. 30
2:30 and 8 p.m.-PTP presents
ACT in Moliere's "Tartuffe" at
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
7 and 9 p.m. - Cinema Guild
presents Antonioni's "Eclipse" in
the Architecture Aud.

-

Student-Faculty Group Flight
PAN AM JET to EUROPE
New York-London-New York-June 1-Aug. 18-$300
Detroit-London-Detroit-June 14-Aug. 11--$342.50
CALL:
FRED M. COHEN LES THURSTON
761-0463 OR 663-5718

*4

G. MICHIGAN

2ND WEEK
Direct from its
Roadshow Engagement

T:
. ,::>.
.:
., _ . .
: ' >
:> > >
:. ::
'.:

'U,

NO SEATS RESERVED
Shows at 1:15-3:50-6:30-9:00
Mats. $1.25; Eves. & Sun. $1.50

0t nurFox
vitthei

m

II

*1
,;4

COLOR BY OELWE
CINEMASCOPE

IN

I

i

I

M

1

(G1ZZLES!
A wild and candid spoof of masculine
sex drives!"
-Bosley Crowther, N.Y. Times
"A real pleasure from beginning to
end!"
-Paul Sawyer, Michigan Daily
b "COMEDY HAS A NEW FREEDOM!
It swells with joy, zest, delight in the
world! A great film! Moviegoers can re-
joice now!"-- Newsweek Magazine

PTP pege6Nt A.C.T.

ARTHUR
MITCHELL

PATRICIA
NEARY

I

"A madly

whirling carnival of mirth!"
-Pittsburgh Press

of the
NEW YORK CITY BALLET
IN EXCERPTS FROM
1 r /'*. t l t^ r 1' k l 1__ k 1I1- T 1'1 A .I I

"Shimmering and immensely
appealing display of style
thundering success!"
-Pittsburgh Daily-Dispatch
"Stunningly recreated N.Y. hit!
--Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

4i

9.
1

..8 hwgerur

THE 1965 LINCOLN CENTER HIT!

In a New Version By

Under the Direction of

11

in IU * n *t liA .1 . k5 hf k A l 1

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan