100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 22, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

WHW MICUTrAN nATTv

' ________________________________________________ -.3 KUA V 1jR..1Ai1kF-RE.AJ
7"l W7,L T:1 I'T n T T xm:.":wM:d xa .::.w avAwT Wu.. W

SATURDAY, JANUARY 22, 1966

6

PEIACE~ KLELARti:
Scientists Lo ok for
Insights in Games

iJ{v:Y+?t::?: rtj{{.::}}p;.}}q "4svrr{4,.. .::v :..:..:.:,: .::. ...:::::::.:ter :::v: v::.:"
:, ..Fi . .._ ,. ,..n{:}..h.r, ;::n ":. M W nvv:r:.ii"::}:: {:4::e::.::.: .::......:.. r,.:}:::p vn.:4'4i i:4}""}h::6."4:,44}:i":J.;.v:r vv .vr .rh.:,n"v.... .!...a.Y.vsh:r.".,vJlrrr.,v5:: na:i:4} } :'F: ...{n.,., vF xn. X:n..^,..... e........... rv i .: }::.}: '¢ : rF'::;":r";...t... :4":{{ +i ,w:
r ... A,.... .., "v; .% 'RY:M1'°.,X+.:i 4T .. Rv;; .:tii"Y:: :.}}::v, ::.::1+-i:.w: .erwr:.^: r. :nv.
..":..........n;:: n;.:::Jn":.v::rfrh:":v:kt {.';wFFT...:.::.£:vnsxsvv en..1.:v..a":::::nrr n ,r.+i' -"'S::i ...,. 1 , ...,, . :.. ''v:.::: "i., ... ,. , .::,..... ... J :.............. .., . ?"{...
.. .,,1.1; ..,J;':r:::: i4'{,. 4 -4;,a} °{y:v'.4;av;. x, .,; ..ii'..:t\hvyr:ii.";C'"r ,p:Y{n: ': :"a1v:,,:,..
..,,,.....,n.ih....r..._..,J9s.....; "..J.r..A..4.vt'k"..r c:h,1 .1,1"r::?4f. ter: o;}..::1,":.1.,:"1._,,:.4 .:in.:..e"..,..:.3C:,M1~}}.}'u'::,,.' w "-r::'t,' }#}.k+t4.".:k, :,+F. .}'isch?>r:.:{.ii:;h "7:isi4:2\ti°.n ^; "':, , : }:- : ": t . £vara rr 'WrS.:C L"'tiu , s:" x ",+.
}"
^y4.1S
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
.. """Yrr,.}}:ipF{{{x{n. {4:4:"}".:4: };.;.i'::.vs{:n.,, :.4.n:.uv. :: rc:::v::..r: ...
.". ., x4 .. "ar.".".:hvx:::::::: }}:4}}F6"x}:isF.: ................. r ,........ ... 4.ii{{4};: n:4:v '4::w:C :<m'v:4'".':r. .. r."r.vrvv::svx ..::v:.v.:,: nvv :: rrrrv.::::: ...... .. _,... '
..fFJ}:"}}:i4::itr}}.ii}}}:::} :::.::::...... . h.:: "n}:::} :".::{: iv vv:.....,... .. ..1 .kv..:......... ....:, by 1......v rFa. .1,...... ..
i ..v ,.. ..: ..:..v.. r: 1..:rq:":: :.:........... ..:. nrx.:rn;"i'{.vv:;"::n ..t "v -nv.-. ,sv
N:tr.AF{4t1, f, ...\,. ,J,1' "A:h1hv: J;,:, ,, :':::.^:::.1v: ,":: :rA {n.. n.. t{1 ...v .... .....'t :: f., .. ............{.......... YnM1. A.{{{{', hYN :: nM1.i., ...." , ".. , ..-,,...
f , ,,, ....,.",.\....srv.t....J ....... .....,..:::, :A4.tl,°nti,3}::::},4rc:X::n1:M1,11'.1 .............:... F.... ... r.....n...nvmf}7ivn::vvv::::: ::A ::::r::::::::,::::J:.v::>}ae{{ins,}:xiai"}} ;,"..}.}'i::}"" ,; ' ;>:asSc '4};11}a..}v4;.4:},.,:,,::.,,;.,:, :p:X 4? ::.k"": 'Ax'}: '".}"4,;. .;. .J{i "._ \:':"'",:c .:_.4. 1 ..
..... ,1,. F.1: ..*...a1..aTaa',.Fcta.,.:.,..+.'k". ,:..1 ,:' o- 3a.:.?x'4}....,.:.h,.',., i,,.':,' fi'",.' t'zKt+,. U;,a.'11 :J a"ktkza:casi,? tt.'+s ,,i

(Continued from Page 1)
sometimes sociological, and even
an ethical 'character." Thus, the
report states, it becomes obvious
that "no normative theory of
games can be derived from the
logical structure of the situations
alone, once certain limits of com-
plexity have been transcended."
Game theory research and its
correlation to real life situations
is at an early stage of develop-
ment. Human motivations are
enormously complex, and human
motivations on the international
level are going to be even more so.
Thus, on the one hand, according
to Rapoport "the reliability of
knowledge can, in principle, be
eventually established by inprov-
ing research techniques, and so,
essentially, depends only on the
'start of the art.'"
But, on the other hand, like any
science, the science of investigat-
ing human interaction by any
technique requires enormous so-
phistication to be of any relevant
value. While one can try to in-
vestigate, say, the. practices of
brinkmanship by investigating in
the laboratory the behavior of sub-
jects in the game 'of Chicken, more
involved political phenomena will
require far more complex con-
structs, and even the one cited
above all will need a good deal of
sophisticated analysis to claim
any really significant insight.
Base Work
Thus Rapoport pointed to the
status of other social sciences,
such as psychology and economics
stressing that, like the seemingly
irrelevant and inconclusive work
in games, these roads of study
needed base work from which to
construct a meaningful discipline
to the point where they have be-
come obviously relevant.
Rapoport pointed out that one
very serious obstacle which would
face the theory even as a highly
sophisticated discipline would be
that the, social and political lead-
ers of the world would have to
accept its observations and, most
importantly, its predictions, as a
model for altering their behavior.
If they would not do this, the
findings pf the study would be of
little value.

Rapoport stressed that "peace
research must concern itself not
only with conditions conducive to
war or peace, but also with the
social and political climate which
favors or inhibits the applicability
of the knowledge gained through
such research" - the researchers,
must learn to clear theim own path.
Obviously the problems facing
the researchers are hugely com-
plex, both in developing their
approach to the point where it
can be called a true "science," and
to the point where it could be
applied where it would do real
good.
With such a vastly important
end, however, and with the per-
spective offered by the "analog-
ous" rapid development of social
sciences such as psychology, the
"games" become as serious as war.
Modify Report
On .bookstore
(Continued from Page 1)
They felt the picket was instead
an attempt to let the administra-
tion know that the idea of a book-
store was not going to be aband-
oned so soon, and that students
were going to continue to de-
mand more voice in the running
of the University.
Douglas Chapman, '68, voiced
the opinion of several of the pick-
eters when he said that "the Re-
gents' interest in the University
is a negative one. They are against
a University bookstore because it
is economically threatening to
their own interests."
Eric Chester, '66, chairman ofg
VOICE, commented that "The
crucial issue is' that students have
no control over the University's
decisions. Cutler made the report
without consulting students and
students were not allowed to an-
swer Cutler's report at the Re-
gents' meeting. This situation can
not be allowed to continue to
exist. The University will have
to open channels of communi-
cation or expect students to re-
ly upon demonstrations to open
channels.""

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
tal responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 22
Day Calendar
Basketball-U-M vs. Minnesota: Yost
Fieldhouse, 1:30 p.m.
Professional Theatre Program Per-
formance-American Conservatory The-
atre Company in Edward Albee's "Tiny
Alice": Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre,
2:30 and 8 p.m.
Cinema Guild-Cocteau's "Beauty and
the Beast": Architecture Aud., 7 and 9
p.m.
Professional. Theatre Program Per-
formance of "Beyond the Fringe" by
the American Conservatory Theatre,
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, 11 p.m.,
Sat., Jan. 22.
General Notices
The Martha Coog Building will con-
tinue to receive first appointments for
residence through Wed., Pan. 26. Please
call 662-3225 for appointment.
Second appointments will be accept-
ed through Wed., Feb. 2.
To All School of Nursing Students:
Starting Mon., Jan. 24, all students
in the School of Nursing can register
in the lobby of the School of Nursing
Bldg. to pre-classify. Pre..classification
will begin Feb. 7. See bulletin boards
in School of Nursing for further infor-
mation,
Late Permission: Freshman and Soph-
omore women living. in Residence
Halls and Sorority Houses who plan
to attend tonight's performance of "Be-
yond the Fringe" at Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre may arrange for a late
permission with their housemothers,i
since the show may run until approx-
imately 1:15 a.m.
Regents Meeting: The February Re-[
gents' meeting has been rescheduled for
Feb. 11 instead of Feb. 18. Communica-
tions for consideration at the meet-1
ing must be in the president's hands
by not later than Jan. 28.-
Summary of Action Taken by Studentl
Government Council at Its Meeting
January 20, 1966
Approved: That Freshmen and Soph-
omore women living in Residence Halls
and Sorority Houses who plan to at-
tend Friday's and Saturday's perform-
ances of "Beyond the Fringe" may ar-
range for a late permission with their1
housemothers.
Approved: That Student Government
Council grant Joint Judiciary CouncilI
temporary office space in Room 1548 of
the SAB.-
Accepted: Report of Student Sesqui-
centennial Committee from Cynthia1
Sampson, chairman of the committee.
Accepted: Report of the CounselingI
Committee plans and activities fromr
Rick Handel, chairman of the Counsel-
ing Committee.
Appointed: Mike Koeneke, personnelr
director of Student Government Coun-1
cil.
Appointed: Bob Smith, chairman ofI
the Public Relations Board.-t
Appointed: Laura Fitch and Mickeys
Eisenberg to serve with the Executive
Committee of the Council in conduct-Y
ing interviews of candidates for thet
current Council vacancy.a
Approved: That SGC create and es-

tablish an interim structure for the
Student Housing Association. Until giv-
en recognition as a student organiza-
tion, the Student Housing Association
shall be responsible to Student Gov-
ernment Council. This interim struc-
ture will be composed of:
A) An executive board.
B) Subcommittees.
C) Constituents.
A) The Executive Board:
1. Composition-The Executive Board
of the Student Housing Association
shall be composed of two representa-
tives appointed by SGC. In addition,
each subcommittee chairman shall sit
on the Executive Board and shall be
initially appointed by SGC.
2. Organization-The Executive Board
of the Student Housing Association
shall elect its own chairman. The chair-
man will have responsibility for call-
ing and running meetings and repre-
senting the association.
3. Powers and duties-The Execu-
tive Board of the Student Housing
Association shall:
a) Set policy for the association and
act as the spokesman for the associa-
tion in negotiation with realtors.
b) Appoint members of the constit-
uency to subcommittees.
c) Appoint subcommittee chairmen.
d) Create by two-thirds vote addi-
tional subcommittees.
e) Must approve all subcommittee
plans for any action or publication
representative of the association as a
body.
f) May call in any outside party to
assist in negotiation.
B) Subcommittees:
Student Housing Association subcom-
mittee structure shall be composed of
three subcommittees:
1. The Rental and Complaints sub-
committee shall:
a) Publish a model' eight month
lease.
b) Establish rating systems.
c) Provide legal advice.
d) Represent student views to pros-
pective Ann Arbor housing developers
regarding types of housing desired, etc.
2. University Planning subcommit-
tee:
a) Represent the Student Housing As-
sociation to the administration through
the Housing Advisory Committee to
the offices of the vice-president for
student affairs and vice-president for
business and finance.1
b) Seek ways to sponsor low cost
housing and, if possible
c) Form a cooperative housing proj-
ect.
3. City Planning subcommittee shall:
a) Establish a list of recommenda-
tions for improving building codesl
and for maximizing land available for
quality high rise development.7
b) Mobilize constituency into an ac-c
tive political party to lobby for thex
immediate election of Ann Arbor city
councilmen favorable to the reform of1
local regulations and codes.t
C) Constituency - Student Housingi
Association constituency shall be openI
to any U. of M. student.
II. SGC begin an intensive piiblicityt
and recruiting campaign for the Stu-
dent Housing Association and appropri-I
ate $500 as initial expenses. hI
III. Appropriate $50 for the estab-1
lishment of a housing library in thec
SGC offices.
IV. SGC appoint the following to thec
Executive Board of the Student Hous-I
ing Association:
Stuart Gordon, chairman, Univer-I
sity Planning Comm.; Neill Hollens-
head, chairman, City Planning sub-t
comm.; Al Goodwin, Rental & Com-c
plaints Committee; Robert Bodkin, SGC2
representative,
Approved: That a committee appoint-I
ed by the Executive Committee ' sub-t
mit an evaluation of the proposed Po-I
lice-Community Relations Program of
the Human Relations Commission of
Ann Arbor to Student Government?
Council. Ed. Robinson and Jack Wind-I
er were appointed.
Approved: That SGC allocate $10 to
have a professional statistician analyze2
the status requirements for conductingI
a student opinion survey on Viet Nam.
O RGA N I ZATI ON
NOTICESa

Placement

i _... .. .. .......................... a.. t{.1...1. 1...4...h.111..1.. }.1 .1.4 .14.:1.:t.:":Stititi }.'4:1Y:ti1: :ti. ....:441 ::11 u.".t. }..:4.:ryti:"1 w"S 4 . i>vx tiif''.*:t".4:: i.4.'4itav:4titi{'i}i

ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Smith College, School for Social Work,
Northampton, Mass.-Announces schol-.
arship aid available for grad trng. in-
cluding child guid., family couns.,
mental health, rehab., & school soc.
work. Special merit stipends also avail-
able. Theory learned in summer is used
during winter with variety of trng. op-
portunities. Program now open to men
also
U.S. Marine Corps-Capt. Dailey will
be in the Lower Lobby of the Union,
Jan. 24, 25 & 26 from 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
to give information about commission
programs for students & grads. Offi-
cer qualification tests given to seniors
with no obligation. No appointment.
needed. Stop by information booth.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS: Bureau
of Appointments-Seniors & grad stu-
dents, please call 764-7460 for appoint-
ments with the following:
MON., JAN. 24-
Harvard Business School, Boston,
Mass-Men & women interested in
grad study in 2 yr. course leading to
MBA. Admission requirements include
degree in any field, in top third of class
& achievement in campus activities,
business, etc. Experience-oriented case
method develops practical, analytical &
decision-making capacities.
TUES., JAN. 25-
VD Branch of U.S. Public Health
Service, Detroit-See above.
Service Business Corp., N.Y.C.-Men
& women grads in Gen. Chem. & Math
for positions in elec. computing. Citi-
zenship not req. if have permanent
visa.
Prudential Insurance Co., Minneapo-
lis, Minn.-Men & women with de-
grees in any field of study for mgmt.
trng. & sales. Located throughout U.S.
International Minerals & Chemical
Corp., Skokie, Il.-Women. BA's in
Gen. Lib. Arts, BA & MA's in Lib. Sci.
for positions in library and secretarial
(p.m. only).
Maritime Admin., Wash., D.C.-Men &
women. Degrees in Econ., Gen. Lib.
Arts, Hist., Journ., etc. for mgmt. trng.,
stat., transport., & gen. writing.
WED., JAN. 26-
S. S. Kreske Co., Detroit-Men with
degrees in Gen. Lib. Arts for positions
in mgmt. trng. located in Mich., Ind,
& Ohio.
The Travelers Insurance Co., Detroit
-Men, Degrees in any field of study,
esp. Math. Positions in Insurance &
Mgmt. Trng. Located throughout U.S.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, Mo. -
Indust. Engr. BSIE. Review systems,
make necessary changes, etc. No exper.
required.
Comm. on Youth Welfare, Chicago-
Urban Research Dept. 1. Social Res.
Analyst I. MA Soc. Sciences plus 2 yrs.
res. and/or field exper. Direct eval. of
program. Soc. Res. Analyst II, MA in
Soc. Econ. or rel., plus 2 yrs. exper. or
equiv. comb of educ. & exper.
Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer
Research, N.Y.C.-Various openings for
BA & MA's in Biochem. chem., micro-
blol., endocrinol., biophysics, biol.
chem., etc. for new grads & alumni.
Datex Corp., Monrovia, Calf.-Vari-
ous openings including, Sr. Project
Engr., Sr. Mech. Engr., Sr. Product
Specialist (Mktg), Applic. Engr., Sales
Engr. (Digital Systems), Prod. Planner.
Midwest Research Institute, Kansas
City, Mo.-1. Sr. Virologist, PhD in vir-
ology, exper, in tissue culture, & rel.
2. Organic Chemist. PhD puls 2-10 yrs.
exper. 3. Applied Polymer Chemist, BS
plus 2-10 yrs. exper. in dev. of plas-
tics. 4. Research Ass't. Degree in Bus,
Admin or Econ. req. Pref. exper.
* ' * *
For further information, please call
764..7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAB-
INTERVIEWS:
JAN. 25-
Camp Tamarack, Ortonville, Mich.-
Counselors, program director, specialist
in arts & crafts, waterfront instructor.
JAN. 27-
Camp Arbutus, Mayfield, Mich. -
Waterfront Instructor & 2 assistants,
arts & crafts instructors, head cook
& assistant. Camp secretary.
Davey Tree Co., Kent, Ohio-Tree
Care Trainees. Earn while you learn.
FEB. 1-
Camp Fairwood & Four Way Lodge,
Torch Lake, Mnch.-Swimming instruc-
tor, arts & crafts, sports assts.
* * *
Details at Summer Placement, 212
SAB.
EDUCATION DIVISION:
The following schools will interview
483-4680
6&6r Ce On CARPENTER RAD
FREE IN-CAR HEATERS
NOW SHOWING
CHARLION
HESTON _quR

RICH iI
;T'ITECHNICOLOR®
PANAVISN®
PLUS
an ALIED ATISs

at the Bureau:
MON., JAN. 24-
Evanston, II1.-Bus, Ed., Souns., Eng-
lish, French, Spanish, French/Spanish,
Latin/French or Spanish, Girls PE,
Home Ec., Lib., Math, Inst. Music-Man,
Biol., Chem., Gen./Phys. Sci., Soc. Stud.,
Spec. Ed. MA and/or Exp.
TUES., JAN. 25-
Willoughby, Ohio-Elem.; J.H.-Engl.,
SS, Girls PE, aMth, Ind. Arts, Science,
French, German, Latin, Russian, Span-
ish; H.S.-Engl., SS, Science, Math, Ind.
Arts, Latin, German, French, Russian,
Spanish, Girls PE, Bus. Ed., Lib., Guid.
(Woman), Slow Learn.
WED., JAN. 26-
Katonah, N.Y. - All Elem. & Sec.
Fields,
Loraine, Ohio-Fields not stated.
THURS., JAN. 27-
Midlothian, I11.-Fields not stated.
FRI., JAN. 28-
Rolling Hills, Calif. (Palos Verdes Uni-
fied Schs.)-Ail Fields except Boys PE;
& Soc. Studies.
MON., 4AN. 31-
Skokie, Ill. (Niles Twp. H.S.) -
Guid. (Woman, Engl., Engl./Debate,;
Math, Spanish.

' ,

TUES., FEB. 1--
Mt. Clemens, Mich. (Macomb County
Schs.)-Ment. Retard., Blind, Deaf, Or-
tho., Homebound, Emot. Dist., Visiting.
Teach., Speech Ther., Diag., Couns. for
Phys. Hdcp.
Mineola, N.Y.-Elem., PE; J.H. -
Engl., French, Home Ec; H.S. - Art,
Bus. Ed., Spanish, Math, Engl., Gen.
Sci./Bio., Phys./Chem., Band/Orch.,
Lib., Soc. Studies, Chem., Guid. Couns.,
Soc. Worker, Nurse.
International Schools Services -
Fields not stated. Exper. pref.
Winchester, Mass.-Fields not stated.
WED., FEB. 2-
Glendora, Calif.-Fields not stated.
Cleveland, Ohio-Elem., Spec. Ed. -
All Sec. Fields except Earth Set., Boys
PE, Spanish, Russian & Speech.
International Schools Services -
Fields not stated. Exper. pref.
THURS., FEB. 3-
Grosse Pointe, Mich.--Elem. K-6, Mu-
sic, French, Phys. Ed.; J.H. - Engl.,
French, Latin, Math, Gen. Sci., Girls
PE, Art; H.S.-Engl./Journ., For. Lan-
guage, Math, Blo., Chem., Physics, Girls
PE, Bus. Ed. Spec. Ed., Ment. Retard.,
Rem. Read., Emot. Maladj., Sp. Corr.,

Psych. Ser., visiting Teach,
Mt. Clemens, Mich.-Plant Dir./Phys.
Sci./Astronomy. other fields not stated,
Fullerton, Calif. (La Habra H.S.) --
Couns., Bus./Typ., English, German,
French/Spanish, Home Ec., Ind. Arts,
Math Phys./Chem., Earth Sci./Phys.
Sci., Art, Lib., Vocal/Inst., Nurse,
French, Latin, Spanish.
FRI., FEB. 4-
Bakersfield Calif. (Kern County H.S.
Dist.)-H.S. Art, Bus. Ed., English, For.
Lang., Home Ec., Ind. Arts, Lib, Math,
Vocal, Inst. Music, Sci., Soc. Studies,
Spec. Ed., Read, Girls PE, Boys PE/
Minor Field.
Flint, Mich. (Carman Sch. Dist.) -
All Elem. Fields.
Territory of Guam-Elem:; Sec.-Art,
Bus. Ed., English, Math, Choral, Band,
Home Ec., Ind. Arts, Boys PE, Girls
PE, French, Sci., Soc. Stud., Couns.,
Lib., Test./Guid., Speech Corr.
Pontiac, Mich. (Waterford Twp. Schs)
-Fields not stated.
* * *
Make appointments now.
For additional information and ap-
pointments, contact the Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB, 764-7462.

0,

U-

PTP
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE
PROGRAM

pI'ejeh t4

A.C.T.

AMERICAN CONSERVATORY
THEATRE

IN

"A madly whirling

carnival of mirth!"
-Pittsburgh Press

"Shimmering and immensely
appealing display of style
... thundering success{"
-Pittsburgh Daily-Dispatch
"Stunningly recreated N.Y. hit!"
-Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

THE 1965 LINCOLN CENTER HIT

In a New Version By
RICHARD WILBUR

Under the Direction of
WILLIAM BALL

MENDELSSOHN THEATRE-JAN. 25-FEB. 5

IIN NICHIGIM

2ND WEEK
Direct from its
Roadshow Engagement

Last Chance To

NO SEATS RESERVED
Shows at 1:15-3:50-6:30-9:00
Mats. $1.25; Eves. & Sun. $1.50
10th Century.Fox
Epresents
'R

"TINY

ALICE"

Se
MAT. & EVE.
SAT. & SUN.

COLOR BY DE LUXE
CINEMASCOPFE

Weekday Matinees to 5 p.m.-$1.25
Evenings and Sundays-$1.50
Shows at 1:30, 4, 6:30 and 9:05

HURRY LAST DAYS
IF YOU HAVE ONLY SEEN IT ONCE,
YOU HAVEN'T SEEN IT AT ALL
HERE COMES THE BIGGEST BOND OF ALL!

Across
Campu-S
SATURDAY, JAN. 22
2:30 and 8 p.m.-The Profes-
sional Theatre Program will pre-
sent the American Conservatory
Theatre Company in' Edward Al-
bee's "Tiny Alice" at the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
7 and 9 p.m. - The Cinema
Guild will present Cocteau's
"Beauty and the Beast" in the
Architecture Aud.
11 p.m.-The Professional Thea-
tre Program will present the
American Conservatory Theatre
Company in "Beyond the Fringe"
at the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.

USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Organizations who are
planning to be active for the Spring
Term must be registered in the Office
of Student Organizations by Jan. 27,
1966. Forms are available in Room 1011
SAB.
Guild House, Study and discussion of
Harvey Cox's "The Secular City," Jan.
23, 7-8:15 p.m., 802 Monroe.
Guild House, Ionday noon luncheon,
Prof. John Haithcox: "India - After
Shastri, What?", Jan. 24, 12-1 p.m., 802
Monroe.
Folk Dance Club (WAA), Intermediate
Folk Dancing, every Monday, 8:30-10:30
p.m., Women's Athletic Bldg.
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw, Sunday morning, Jan. 23,
services at 9:45 and 11:15: "The Role
of the Church in Contemporary Life,"
Rev. Donald Larsen, speaker. Bible class
at 8:45, 9:45, and 11:15. All welcome.
Gamma Delta, Lutheran student or-
ganization, 1511 Washtenaw, Sun., Jan.
23, supper at 6 p.m., program at 6:45:
"Human Relations" by the Rev. Don-
ald Larsen. NLC students special guests.
All others welcome.

MONDAY!
onrerv4zz'or/
HEATRE FOIDAT/Of
WILLIAM BALL, GENERAL DIRECTOR

ARTHUR

PATRPCIA

TONIGHT!
2zmerz
WILLAM BALL., GEN4ERAL DIRECTOR
LATE

MITCHELL NEMRY
AY Ge c7T'AIfZAT

IN Exers r " $W

ALL. SEATS1
i2 50

N ~t gu ad wzc ~ziw.
NEXT ATTRACTION FEB. 16 & 17th'
DORIS DAY-I-ROD TAYLOR
"DO NOT DISTURB" "OTHELLO"
U !
* ,
TONIGHT at 7 and 9 P.M.
1 1
JEAN COCTEAU'S
I,
1 1
1 ,
1 !
1 ,
i ,
1 !
A remarkably beautiful and moving film
--
1 1
1 - - l- -!

Read
Daily
Classifieds

LYThA BONiUS*-
PE RFORHMANCE
TAN. E4 -:00 PM
NMR1DELSSOHN THEATRE
All seATrS *1.50

'z
t3-s ATouJ
a 11 IAIU

A .ZZLES!

release
_/A

Y7AN.?1,ZZ'e- 11=00 PM.
1IITSS H E ~ATR~E

I-1

A wild and candid spoof of masculine
sex drives!"
-Bosley Crowther, N.Y. Times

J

-.._

r

r

"A real pleasure- from beginning to
end!"
-Paul Sawyer, Michigan Daily
&P "COMEDY HAS A NEW FREEDOM!
It swells with joy, zest, delight in the
world! A great film! Moviegoers can re-
joice now!" -Newsweek Magazine
.d9.~mamilL

11

UNIVERSITY CHAMBER CHOIR
THOMAS HILBISH, Conductor
GESUALDO-J. S. BACH-STRAVINSKY
AMERICAN PREMIER OPUS 27. ARNOLD SCHOENRERG

I

II

I I

I

11

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan