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January 21, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-21

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PAGE TWO

TUF Mi'f'.HIFC. A m nA irT.v

____________ ..________________________________ . a ii.l~i. JRKUV ,l~l R L Y

FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 1966

British Film Praises
Irnocence of Youth

Consider Housing, Bookstore

TV Contract Forces Writer's Cancellation

By PAUL SAWYER
With "The Knack," British
director Richard Lester takes his
place (beside Paul Goodman,
maybe) as the English-speaking'
world's foremost singer of the
praises of youth. His latest film
has all the gay abandon and
frisky iconoclasm of his earlier
work; but it is above all an ex-'
uberant hymn to youth and in-
nocence.
In fact, it is just one in a recent
series of British films dealing with
the subject - the '"young inno-
sents" have apparently supplanted
the "angry young men"-all, of
which have wide-eyed, plain-faced
post-adolescents -like Rita Tush-
ingham as their hero.
This film, adapted (quite freely,
I gather) from a play, features
Ray Brooks as Colin, an energetic
young schoolteacher living girl-
less in the heart of London and
growing more restless with each
day. His tenant, one Tolen, is a
cynical sophisticate of the Steer-
forth tradition who successfully,
hooks one girl after another, op-'
erating on the assumption that
all girls like to be dominated.
It looks as though innocence
dosen't have a chance, until Colin
and his friend Tom, a ne'er-do-
well artist, run into the inevitable
Rita Tushingham, who has been
endlessly in search of the nearest
YWCA. There follow a series of
delightfully imaginative scenes,
including the most unusual rape
scene you will ever see.
In its infatuation with youth,
"The Knack" trusts no one over
30. Adults appear from time to
t i m e in various hypocritical
guises, and much of the sound-
track is loaded with gossipy voices

censuring the present immorality
of young people. In one brief
moment, a voice asks "Where do
they get it from?" while a milk
truck pulls into view carrying an
ad with a bare-legged girl on it.
Tolen is himself too old for his
years. He is always excessively
mature, and Tom and Colin's
playful spontaneity strikes him as
"childish." In a larger sense, the
film is in its own way a protest
against hypocrisy and pettiness
in general, an angry-young-man
film without bitterness.
Lester's filmic technique, as
usual, augments the general mood
of spontaneity and freshness with
its flowing photography, and oc-
casional impulsive leaps into fan-
tasy and pure nonsense.
In the sequence, for example,
in which Tom, Colin, and the girl
ride across London on a rolling
bedstead, Lester puts them now on
top of a truck, now floating down
the Thames, now seated beside a
parking meter. It's done mostly
for fun, but occasionally these
fantastic scenes function as ob-
jective correlatives, if you will,
of 'the general mood of the char-
acters.
In the same sequence, moreover,
the bedstead itself, bouncing mer-
rily and emptily down the streets
for all to see, is a kind of embodi-
ment of the fundamental inno-
cence the film celebrates.
It does not seem likely that Les-
ter will go on forever making un-
self-conscious films about unspoil-
ed youngsters and be successful
each time. But "The Knack" suc-
ceeds. Aided by lively pacing, a
clever screenplay, and some re-
markably endearing characteriza-
tions, .it is a real pleasure from
beginning to end.

(Continued from Page 1)
stantially aid work in the area
of housing?"
Bodkin: "The concept of the
SHA is to broaden the field of
work in the area of housing and
to strengthen student support and
participation within the organi-
zation. I believe student support
and energy are important if hous-
ing problems are to be effectively
handled by students at all.".
The motion asking for SGC to
conduct a survey of student opin-
ion on the war in Viet Nam was
defeated because of disagreement
on the method of the survey.
Several Council members said
that the motion sponsored by
Bodkin and Jack Winder, '67, did
not provide for a valid sampling
of student opinion because it
would only question 300 students
on the issues.
Steve Schwartz, '67, said, "I
don't believe that the return on
300 questionnaires, which would
be somewhat less than 300, would
be representative of either the.300
persons consulted or of the 35,000
students on campus."
Bodkin said that the figure of
300 was recommended by a re-
search assistant affiliated with the
Survey Research Center.
Bodkin added that another mo-
tion would be brought before SGC
after agreement on a method for
conducting the survey and speci-
fically upon the number involved
in the survey.
Schwartz said that the most im-
portant consideration is the or-
ientation of the persons sampled.
He commented, "The outcome of
the survey will depend upon
whether the people questioned are
in the 'middle' on the Viet Nam
question, or whether they are

strongly in favor or against the
war there."
There were other questions in
the survey debate:
--Would a mailing or interview
situation be most accurate and
feasible?
-Should the questions be "yes-
no" or should they be interpreta-
tive?
-Would it be feasible to have
the Survey Research Center con-
duct interviews for the survey?
-Should the sociology, political
science and psychology depart-
ments be invited to join in mak-
ing the survey?
Mickey Eisenberg, '67, said, "We
have to answer questions on sta-
tistical procedures and alternative
methods of handling this type of
survey before we can hope to of-
fer up valid results."
A motion was passed allocating
$10 to have a statistician present
to SGC viable methods of mak-
ing a valid survey. The statisti-
cian is expected to make the pres-
entation at the next SGC meet-
ing.
The letter criticizing Cutler for
his role in the formulation of a
recommendation regarding the
University Bookstore was printed
in its entirety in The Daily yes-
terday and was signed by the
SGC Bookstore Committee.,
The motion requesting SGC to
endorse this letter was defeated
for a variety of reasons:
Bodkin said, "The letter lacks
timing. Cutler would have spoken

to SGC, but since the letter ap-
peared he was reluctant to meet
with Council. Furthermore, the
letter lacks clarity and indicts
Cutler without explaining Cut-
ler's stand."
Laura Fitch said, "The general
relationship between students and
the Office of Student Affairs
should be the central focus of
SGC, not one issue within this
relationship."
She said further, "The issue is
distorted and the letter has al-
ready dealt its effect by making
Dr. Cutler hesitant to comment
outside of official statements. The
question is now whether he can,
in his position, publically disagree
with the Regents or whether he
can actually serve as a go-between
for the students."
"We must show that we are in-
terested in the relationship be-
tween the Office of Student Af-
fairs and students. Can Dr. Cut-
ler do what he has promised to
students--open channels of com-
munication? This is the basic
question," she concluded.
Bodkin commented on the posi-
tion of the Office of Student Af-
fairs as related to the hierarchy
of the administration and stu-
dents. He said that SGC should
draw up a letter of concern about
the relationship.
Steve Schwartz, a sponsor of the
motion, said, "We must find out
whether Vice-President Cutler is
institutionally aligned with the
administration, committed to the
students, or in the nebulous
middle."

(Continued from Page 1)
Last Friday, January 14, the
radio-television corporations in-
sisted on Lomax signing contracts
which, due to taping schedules,
would impede his leaving Los An-
geles at any time. If he did not
sign at this time, any opportuni-
ties for future developments would
be completely lost.
According to a statement re-
leased by the committee Lomax
"had no choice" but to sign the
contracts, feeling that the oppor-

tunity they afforded him to per- ture writer-in-residence program,
form a vital service to the Los but they are hopeful that al-
Angeles area, and especially the though the Lomax program has
Negro community, required him proved disappointing, the entire
to cancel his University obliga- idea of such a program will not
tions. be abandoned. As is evidenced by
In describing Lomax's present the great demand and warm re-
situation, the committee express- ception to Lomax's proposed visit,
ed its "appreciation to Mr. Lo- the committee is confident that
max's honesty and present in- any future programs of this na-
volvement in the deeply troubled ture would be highly successful.
Los Angeles area."
At present the committee has
made no plans concerning a fu-I' "16

~~1

s'-

In Detroit .. .
CONCEPT EAST THEATER

401 E. Adams

Shows at 1:30.4:00-6:30 & 9:05
Weekday Matinee-.$1.25
Evenings & Sunday-$1.50
IF YOU HAVE ONLY SEEN
IT ONCE, YOU HAVEN'T
SEEN IT AT ALL
THE BIGGEST BOND
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z~ t r

presents
Harold Pinter's "THE CARETAKER"

I

I

Fri., Sat., Sun.-Thru Jan.

8:30 P.M.

_

"" "" """'

~ ~ ~ ~

row. MICHIGAN

2ND WEEK
Direct from its
Roodshow Engagement

.
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Shows at 1:15-3:50-6:30-9:00
Mats. $1.25; Eves. & Sun. $1.50

middle."

X. 20th Century-Fox
Presents
S.

4

IN

FREE UNIVERSITY:
Group Aims at Creativity,

Professional Theatre Program
presents
the National Tour of
WINS CUNRI-EDl
SIENCE

I

TEbKEVIN MAcO , PANAVMSO
INI i ,1 uNiwEDARTSS

COLOR BY ofELUXE
CINEMASCORE

(Continued from Page 1)
another associate said.,' As the
group's course syllabus says, the
university involves. "a basic com-
mitment to the idea -that intel-
lectual creativity demands intense
and serious involvement with the
subject matter and that it de-
mands the utmost in effort and
precision."
The university has not taken
any of its ideas for curriculum
or teaching methods from other
free universities, associate Harvey
Feinber said, though it has been
inspired by them.
The associates emphasized that
they expected the curriculum to
evolve as the university progresses.
"If classes are not demanded they.
will be dropped. Classes will be

created when someone feels the
desire to discuss his ideas with
someone," one associate said.
No location has yet been set for
the university's classes. That will
be established, along with the
classes' meeting times, at regis-
tration.
'en courses will be offered ini-
tially. They are: "An Approach to
Historical Theory," to examine the
internal processes of history;
"Block," a study of jazz; "Con-
versations about America," a lit-
erary look at the nature of the
individual as an American; "Ed-
ucation," a study of a teacher's
role in society; "Marxism and
Art," a study of Communism's in-
fluence on art; f "Modern Film,"
an analysis of the film as an art

medium; "Modern Political Econ-
omy," a study of values, power
and economics in America today;
"Poetry Now," on the social rele-
vance of poetry; "Power, Policy,
Elites and the, Structure of Amer-
ican Society," an analysis of the
structure of American society;
"Workshop on Art and Values," a
study of the relation between ar-
tistic experiences and the forma-
tion of social values, and "Pros-
pectus for Contemporary Music,"
a study of modern music as a
whole.
"An Approach to Historical
Theory" will be limited to an en-
rollment of 10 students, "Block"
to 15 students and "Structure of
American Society' 'to 20 students.
All other courses will have unlim-
ited enrollments.

by IRA WALLACH
*,RUTH McDEVITI

4,

I

8:30 P.M.

MON., JAN. 24
HILL AUDITORIUM

HILL AUDITORIUM BOX OFFICE OPEN
THURSDAY & VIfO 10-5

U1

'' 6 ZZLES.!
Director Richard Lester has up and
done it again . . with a camera that
whizzes like a slap-stick in the hands
of an old burlesque clown, he whips
through this neo-Keystone business,
flashing sight gags and fast throw-
away lines. A wild and candid spoof of
masculIine - sex drives!"
"COMEDY HAS ANEW FREEDOM
It swells .with joy, zest, delight in the
world? A great film! Moviegoers can re-
joice now!" - Newsweek Magazine
...and mw ogWetits
BEST PICTURE
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NMI

TODAY AT 8:00 P.M.

Today

4~1 ~igj

MdS

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:,3

PTP
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE
PROGRAM

pejeh t4

A.C.T.
AMERICAN CONSERVATORY
1 THEATRE

1 t
I r
TONIGHT at 7 and 9 P.M.
f t
r. t
William Weilman's
r ,
f ,
Public Enemy
starring
r James Cagney
Jean Harlow
Joan Blondell

"Tantalizing!"
"Stunning !"

-N.Y. Times
-N.Y. Post

IA

"Wildly imaginative !'
--Saturday Review
"Electric excitement!"
--Pittsburgh Press

I A A - N l & w 1 m r l - .r-- rI M

I ti:::: 1 IM L7 I li°% W 1 -

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