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August 27, 1965 - Image 16

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-08-27

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PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

VV.MAV AlUll"Onm art Inime

RAGE EIGHT THE MICHTGAN D&ITV

EAclAl, L1U~.U 27, k1965

i

INDIAN-PAKISTANI STRIFE:
Fighting Flares in Kashmir

By RICHARD F. NEWCOMB.
Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer
The Vale of Kashmir, Srinagar,
the Punjab-fabled names and
far-off places. Yet the war in
Kashmir was real enough.
As if the Indian government
didn't have trouble enough at
home-religious riots, famine, in-
flation--blood was flowing again
high in the mountains in the
northwest corner of the Indian
subcontinent. It was nothing
new, for over the centuries the
highlands of Kashmir had been
fought over and ruled by Hindus,
Chinese, Mohammedans, Moguls,

Afghans and Sikhs. But this time
there were overtones.
As it faced Pakistani forces
across a 16-year-old cease-fire
line, India had at its back the
menace of Red China, ever press-
ing down from the north. Pakistan
and Red China are now very
friendly. Jutting into the land
route between them lies Kashmir,
a state about the size of Oregon.
In the old days the colonials fled
the summer heat of Srinagar for
the popular hill station of Gul-
marg, there to hunt the ibex and
brown bear, the Kashmir stag and
the oorial. The people, as of old,
fashioned the down undercoat of

the Kashmir goat into shawls cov-
eted the world around as pure
cashmere.
'Kashmir Problem'
But with the end of World
War II came the end of British
rule, the partitioning of the sub-
continent into Indian and Paki-
stani spheres, and the "Kashmir
problem." Kashmir could not de-
cide whether to go with India,
with Pakistan or become inde-
pendent. War filled the void un-
til, in 1949, the United Nations
achieved a truce of sorts and split
Kashmir with a 450-mile cease-
fire line straggling across the
country and into the mountains

'I

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EA lo

mAR

near the Chinese border. Though
the population was largely Mos-
lem, two-thirds of Kashmir fell
into Hindu India. Neither side
has been happy with the govern-
ment.
The latest fighting flared on an
August day when Srinagar was
full of tourists. Cowherds saio
there were guerrillas in the moun-
tains near Srinagar. Indian police
approached a band of innocent-
looking herdsmen who suddenly
whipped automatic weapons from
under their flowing robes and
opened fire. Three days later the
guerrillas had fought their way
into Srinagar, clashed with has-
tily-reinforced Indian forces and
set fires that destroyed hundreds
of homes. A clandestine radio,
"The Voice of Kashmir," broad-
cast instructions of a "revolu-
tionary council." An uprising was
underway, and very nearly suc-
ceeded.
Recent Clash
In the course of crushing the
uprising, Indian forces crossed the
cease-fire line at three points in
the Kargil area and re-occupied
posts they had only recently given
up. Pakistan, while disavowing
any officialapart in the uprising,
complained that this violated the
truce of 1949. India replied that it
had to retake the outposts to pro-
tect its route of supply for Indian
forces guarding the border against
Red China.
Then-resumed a 20-year-old rou-
tine-talks at the United Nations,
Pakistan and India each present-
ing its side, each blaming the
other. And in Srinagar the mer-
chants mourned. "The tourists
are gone and our businesses will
fail."
It was a small war this time-
several hundred killed on each
side-but nobody believed it was
the last war. The Vale of Kash-
mir lies between two worlds, in
geography and politics.

USICAL

International Presentations for 1965-1966
CHORAL UNION SERIES

u

IVVERSITY

SOCIETY

KTRA

CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, JEMARTINON, Conductor
JOHN BROWNING, Piano soloist
YEHUDI MENUHIN, Violinist ............................
CZECH PHILHARMONIC, KAREL ANCERL, Conductor'
POZNAN CHOIR, from Poland ...........................
MOSCOW PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA, .................. .

Sat., Oct.
. Fri., Oct.
Fri., Oct.
Tues., Nov.
Mon., Nov.

9
15
29
2
15

"BARBER OF SEVILLE" (Rossini)

NEW YORK CITY OPERA CO.. .

Sun., Nov. 21

D

EY!

GRAND BALLET CLASSIQUE DE FRANCE...................Tues., Nov. 23

PHYLLIS CURTIN, Soprano of the Metropolitan Opera Co. ......
MONTE CARLO NATIONAL ORCHESTRA, ................
PAUL PARAY, Conductor, MICHAEL BLOCK, Piano Soloist
NATIONAL BALLET, from Washington, D.C. ..........(2:30

Thurs.,
. Sat.,

Jan.
Feb.

20
26

) Sun., Mar. 27

DELIVER
PAPERS
FOR THE
ALL 764-0550
1-4 P.M.

EXTRA SERIES,
CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA, GEORGE SZELL, Conductor .......... Wed., Oct. 20
MOSCOW PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA,

with Igor Oistrakh, Violin soloist ................... . .. .

Tues., Nov. 16

VC

For RESULTS
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

"PAGLIACCI" and "CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA," New York City Opera Co.
(2:30) Sun., Nov. 21
RUMANIAN FOLK BALLET ..............................Wed., Feb. 16
RUDOLF SERKIN, Pianist..............................Mon., Mar. 7
CHAMBER ARTS SERIES
NETHERLAND CHAMBER ORCHESTRA,
SZYMON, GOLDBERG, Conductor and Violinist ................Mon., Oct. 18
RAFAEL PUYANA, Harpsichordist ..............................Sun., Oct. 31
NEW YORK PRO MUSICA, NOAH GREENBERG, Conductor ........Fri., Nov. 12
HERMANN PREY, Baritone, in a Lieder Recital ...................Wed., Feb. 2
VIENNA OCTET.. ................................Tues., Mar. 1
I SOLISTI VENETI..................................... Wed., Mar. 16
CHICAGO LITTLE SYMPHONY, THOR JOHNSON, Conductor .. Thurs., Mar. 31
SEASON TICKETS NOW ON SALE-
Single performances (all three series) -Counter sale begins Sept. 10.

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+ Use Daily Classifieds +

i

tr-__________________________ _.__________________ -- _

panhellenic

ijte441ah

or

OPNEN

HOUSES

Ii

Benita Valente, Soprano Stanley Kolk, Tenor
Doris Mayes, Mezzo-Soprano Malcolm Smith, Bass
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
and members of
DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Mary McCall Stubbins, Organist.
Lester McCoy, Conductor

i
i

Dec. 3-4,
8:30
and
Dec. 5,
2:30

ALL WOMEN WELCOME!

7:00-9:00 P.M.

Tickets:

$2.50-2.00-1.50-1.00. Counter sale begins October 1

i
t
l

f Y V Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

August

31

ALPHA GAMMA DELTA,

FESTIVALS

l!

1322

Hill St.

GAMMA. PHI BETA

Chamber Dance Festival
ALBA/REYES SPANISH DANCE COMPANY..............Fri., Oct. 22
PAUL TAYLOR DANCE COMPANY ........................... Sat., Oct. 23

1520

S.

University

KOREAN DANCERS ("THE LITTLE ANGELS")..........

(2:30), Sun., Oct. 24

September 1

KAPPA ALPHA THETA
1414 Washtenaw

TICKETS ON SALE NOW

COLLEGIATE SOROSIS
1501 Washtenaw

Chamber Music Festival (three concerts)
NEW YORK CHAMBER SOLOISTS, including.ADELE ADDISON, Soprano;
and CHARLES BRESSLER, Tenor...................Feb. 18, 19, 20

4

Counter sale of tickets begins November 5

Mill

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