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August 27, 1965 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-08-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

6 THE MICHIGAN DAILY ?AC
TWO-YEAR AUTHORIZATION:

aE SEVEN

Aid Overhaul Defeated

-Daily-Richard Steiner
WORKMEN PUT THE FINISHING -touches on renovations which will provide more study space in
the Undergraduate Library. Work was begun July 13 and is scheduled for completion Sept. 7.
UGLI Expands Study Space

There will be less of a crowd,
traipsing the aisles looking for
seats in the Undergraduate Li-
brary this semester due to a re-
arrangement of library equipment.
This will allow for 371 additional
study spaces.
The work which started July 13
will be completely finished Sep-
*ember 7, after the new furniture
arrives andI is installed.
The new spaces will be' either
single desks or tables.
Stacks have been moved and
aisles decreased in order to pro-

vide for maximum usage of floor
space. Although the library will
seem crowded with furniture and
stacks, the equivalent of one floor
of study space will be created.
When the work is completed,
the UGLI will have approximate-
ly 2000 study spaces available.
Reorganization has been carried
out with the aid of the University
industrial engineering graduate
students as planners.
Weekend Moving
The plant department is doing
the actual moving, much of which

II

occurs on weekends. Decreased at-
tendance during the summer ses-
sions has given an opportunity to
work with minimal effect on li-
brary users.
In addition. inconvenience has
been reduced because workers re-
arrange one floor at a time.
Head Librarian Rose Faucher
cited figures of 7000-8000 stu-
dents the UGLI serves each day
in the fall. She also explained
there was no need for increased
shelf space because the UGLI is
used as a working collection rath-
er than a reference source. This
means there is a rapid turnover
keeping volumes off the shelves.
Other Libraries
In addition, an engineering li-
brary on North Campus, consid-
ered in the future, would provide
the UGLI with two floors of ad-
ditional space for study and stack
facilities.
Miss Faucher also noted that
study space can also be found in
departmental libraries in other
campus buildings.
When the reorganization is
completed, she said, the UGLI
will be better equipped to handle
increasing demands for study
space.

By ERNEST B. VACCARO
WASHINGTON (IP) - Congres-
sional passage of President Lyn-
don B. Johnson's $3.36-billion for-
eign aid authorization bill has left
,Senate advocates of a drastic
overhaul of the program licking
their wounds in defeat.
The Senate's battle with the
House for a two-year authoriza-
tion and a revamping of the over-
seas-aid format is certain to' be
renewed in the next session.
The Senate caved in Tuesday
when it voted 67-27 passage of a
bill tailored to House demands,
and previously approved by that
body. All it needs is Johnson's
signature.
Amount
SThe amount of authorizations
didn't even figure in the major
dispute this year, and the long-
agreed upon totals came within
$97 million of what Johnson ask-
ed.
The final amount that actually
will be made available to finance
the program will be fought out
in a subsequent appropriations bill
providing the money.
Here's what the Senate wanted,
and for which its conferees ar-
gued unsuccessfully in 14 meet-
ings with House negotiators ex-
tending overtwo months:
" A two-year authorization to
avoid the yearly struggle over for-
eign aid legislation and to give
aid officials more time for plan-
ning their overseas military and
economic'assistance programs.
r Termination of the program
in its present form at the end of
two years and the creation of a
congressional committee to inves-
tigate its administration and rec-
ommend changes to reduce spend-
ing and concentrate future aid in
countries where it will be most ef-
fective.
Got Neither
It got neither. Instead it got
promises from the House con-
ferees to consider a multi-year
authorization next year and from
the administration to recommend
a longer program then. It got

WELCOME
STUDENTS
see
1 eo~al0°

or

MEASURES X-RAYS
'U' Experiment Orbits
In Sunshine Satellite'

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CAPE KENNEDY, Fla. M) -- A
"sunshine satellite" was sent aloft
to study the sun recently but
disappeared into a dark cloud of
technical difficulties. The satel-
lite carried a University experi-
ment.
A three-stage Delta rocket dart-
ed skyward from Cape Kennedy at
10:17 a.m. to push the 620-pound
satellite toward an intended 350-
mile-high orbit.,
They did'not know whether the
satellite, named OS03 for Oribit-
ing Solar Observatory, had achiev-
ed a lower orbit or had plunged
into the ocean.
But 47 minutes after the launch,
officials announced the payload
had not achieved the planned or-
bit because of apparent trouble
with the rocket's third stage.
Mission Fails
But, they said, its mission was
an apparent failure.
Officials said the final, solid-
fuel stage of the rocket ignited
prematurely and the satellite ap-
parently did not reac]1 the plan-
ned orbital velocity.
OS03 carried nine experiments
to continue solar investigations
begun by two earlier OSO satel-
lites, launched in 1962 and last
February by the National Areo-
nautics and Space Administration.
The six-pound University pack-
age in the satellite is designed to
detect and measure X-rays from
the sun that are longer, or less
penetrating, than those emitted
by medical or dental X-ray ma-
chines.
University Project Director
Richard G. Teske explained that
this part of the Orbiting Solar-
CLEANING
SPECIAL

Observatory experiment is "to ob-
tain information on the relation-
ship of X-ray production to other
kinds of activity which takes place
on the sun.
X-Ray Emissions -
"It will also help astronomers
to understand the physical con-
ditions in the solar atmosphere
which lead to the emission of
these X-rays," Teske said,
The OSO experiments could also
help in predicting solar flares
whose swiftly - generated X-rays
could menace manned space
flights.
T h e University observations
with OSO will be studied in con-
nection with ground-based obser-
vations made at the University's
McMath-Hulbert Observatory near
Pontiac, where the sun is under
constant surveillance during day-
time, cloud-free hours.
Assisting Teske at Cape Ken-
nedy are John Maurer and Ray-
mond Kuriak of the University
Space Physics Laboratory, who
are technical supervisors for the
project.
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