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November 30, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-11-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREEJ

TUESDY, NOEMBER30, 165 TU------GAN-AI-Y-A(-K--'R-

a cm %A Ja AL &a "Ju

Diplomats Predict Sino-Soviet Break

VIET NAM:
McNamara Sees Prolonged
Struggle, Mor ..Troops

By CLARENCE FANTO
Special To The Daily
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y.-Well-
informed sources here report that
the Soviet Union is formally pre-
paring a full diplomatic break
with Communist China.
Eastern European diplomats in-
dicate the break will be announced
following a Communist Party Cen-
tral Committee meeting in Moscow
early in December. The Supreme.
Soviet (parliament) would pre-
sumably ratify the decision ex-
pected to be made by the Central

Committee, which is composed of
the highest ranking Soviet Com-
munist party officials.
The reason for the Soviet de-
cision to break relations with
Peking now, these informants say,
can be traced directly to the Viet
Nam war. The Soviets do not want
to be drawn more deeply into the
conflict and apparently fear an
imminent move by Communist
China to commit large numbers
of troops and materials to the war.
The Eastern European diplomats
did not elaborate on the causes
for the new Soviet fears over pos-

sible actions by Peking: The situa- I wrest leadership of the world

tion has ironict
Moscow has, thu
be a larger sup
North Viet Nam t
The Soviets are
the surface-to-a
placements which
other major No
centers.
The Sino-Sovie
pute has reached
fury in recent
charged Peking w
break formally w
establish a riva

touches because
s far, proved to
plier of aid to
than Red China.
responsible for
ir missile em-
ring Hanoi and

Communist movement from Rus-
sia. Several weeks ago, Peking's
major theoretical journals pro-
claimed a doctrine pointing to
Communist China as the true
heirs of Lenin's revolution.

rth Vietnamese
t ideological dis-
new heights of
days. Moscow
with planning to
ith Moscow and
1 movement to

Any formal Soviet move to break
relations with Communist China
might imperil Moscow's own posi-
f tion as ideological leader of the
v Eastern European Communist na-
tions. The satellite nation diplo-
mats who originally reported the
Soviet plan also indicated that
there was some dissension in
Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Ru-
mania and Yugoslavia on the wis-
dom of the projected Russian
action.
Leaders in those nations were
said to feel that any move to
further fragment the world Com-
munist movement at this time
would lead to a severe loss of
political power and prestige.

major shakeup was imminent
within the Soviet leadership.
The Soviet government ordered
the American Broadcasting Com-
pany's Moscow bureau to close
several weeks ago following a re-
port by that network's diplomatic
correspondent John Scali that a
major power shift was likely by
the end of this year.
In other actions which may por-
tend news of major significance
from Russia, Western diplomats
have been ordered not to travel in
certain previously unrestricted
areas of the Soviet Union. Similar
restrictions were put into effect
in several Eastern European satel-
lites.
The only event which could post-
pone an immediate Soviet-Chinese
break, one UN diplomat said,
would be amassive increase in the
United States' military commit-
ment to South Viet Nam. Such
an action might tend to increase
pressures on both Moscow and
Peking from other Communist na-
tions to patch up their ideological
dispute, at least temporarily, to
cope with what is seen as a po-
tentially grave threat to North
Viet Nam from the U.S.

rItish Cabinet Debates
lam bian Request for~id

SAIGON, South Viet Nam W)- C
Secretary of Defense Robert S.t
McNamara ended his visit to Viets
Nam yesterday by declaring that!
the United States would throw in:
as many fighting men as neededt
to wage the war against the Com-t
munists.V
McNamara told newsmen at the
airport after his fact-finding- tour
that his most dramatic impressiont
is that "We have stopped losing
the war."
He added, however, that the in-
creased ferocity of Viet Cong and
North Vietnamese attacks in re-
cent weeks indicated "a clear de-
cision by Hanoi to escalate in-
filtration and raise the level of
the conflict."
McNamara declined to specu-;
late on the total U.S. force that!
will be required, but his comments
heightened speculation that he
will advise President Johnson to
increase American ground forces!
in Viet Nam from 165,000 to 300,-

000 men and step up air attacks on Division headquarters in the cen-
the North Vietnamese jungle. tral highlands 260 miles north of

supply routes.
These were believed to be the
minimum requests of U.S. mili-
tary commanders during their
talks with McNamara during his
whirlwind tour.
Before heading back to Wash-
ington, McNamara made a quick
trip to U.S. 1st Cavalry, Airmobile,

Saigon.
Before departing, McNamara
summarized the fighting of recent
weeks, commenting:
"The decision of the Viet Cong
to stand and fight expresses their
decision to carry on the conflict.
It leads to one conclusion-it will
be a long war."

LUNCH-DISCUSSION
TUESDAY, November 30, 12:00 Noon
U.M. International Center

LONDON (Y) - Prime Minister
Harold Wilson held an emergency
meeting of his cabinet yesterday
amid reports that Britain was
ready to send a Royal Air Force
squadron to Zambia bordering re-
bellious Rhodesia. -
The meeting lasted 112 hours.
Wilson has shown wariness
about sending British ground
forces to meet black-ruled Zam-
bia's request for troops to pro-
tect the Kariba Dam. The dam is
jointly operated with Rhodesia
and is the main source of power
for Zambia's huge copper mines.
A squadron is made up of 12 to
18 planes. Depending on the type

of planes, there would be 28 to
40 air crewmen, 48 to 100 ground
crewmen and 100 to 200 men
assigned to administrative duty.
Threatens Unity
The question of troops for Zam-
bia threatened to split the fragile
unity British political parties have
maintained in face of Rhodesia's
seizure of independence.
The opposition Conservatives
oppose any escalation of measures
against Rhodesia.
Zambia's demand was brought
to Wilson Sunday night by Mal-
colm MacDonald, Britain's special
representative in east and central
Africa.

Some sources said the demand -"The prevalent feeling in the
amounted to an ultimatum from satellite nations is that all Com-
Zambia's President K e n n e t h munist nations must unite in the
Kaunda to seek aid from other face of Western "aggression"
countries if Britain didn't send against a fellow Communist state,
him troops. Saboteurs knocked out North Viet Nam.
the power line from the dam to . Western diplomats were skep-
the copper mines for 24 hours tical about the reports, but con-
last week. ceded that Sino-Soviet political
Secret Buildup tensions have been stretched near
A dispatch from Lusaka, the the breaking point in recent weeks.
Zambian capital, quoted informed It is felt that a formal diplomatic
sources there as saying a secret rupture might be initiated by
buildup of British Royal Air Force either Peking or Moscow, or that
personnel in Zambia has been go- the actions might be announced
ing on since late last week. Zam- almost simultaneously. In this way,
bian and British officials refused each nation could presumably
to confirm this but it was known avoid criticism by other Com-
that several RAF officers arrived munist nations for acting to dis-
in Lusaka last Friday. Some RAF rupt the world movement, which
officers have been serving on loan is already badly fragmented.
with the Zambian air force. The Soviet Central Committee
The Lusaka sources said Britain meeting next month is a crucial
would compromise by sending some one, since it comes fourteen
military ground personnel, al- months after the ouster of former
though it has not favored this premier Nikita Khrushchev. The
step, and Zambia would com- initial testing period of the Brezh-
promise by agreeing that their nev-Kosygin team has not been
personnel would not actually in- auspicious,rand there have been
vade Rhodesia. persistent reports recently that a

"LIBRARY
For reservations,
call 662-5529

SUBJECT:
PROBLEMS IN BRITISH EAST AFRICA"
Speaker: JOSEPH ROBERTS
Director, Extension Department,
Ann Arbor Public Library
Sponsored by the
Ecumenical Campus Center

World News Roundup

By The Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y .-The
UN General Assembly approved
without a dissenting vote ye'ster-
day the convening of a world dis-
armament conference to which
Red China would be invited. It
would be held not later than 1967.
Secretary-General U T h a n t
termed the vote a milestone on
the road toward universality of
the world organization-the in-
clusion of Communist China and
other nations outside the United
Nations.
- * * *
WASHINGTON-A world police
force, disarmament and birth con-
trol were some of the proposals
drawing top attention yesterday

at the opening
conference on
operation.

of a White House
international co-

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Michigan Union Student Offices-Beginning 2 P.M.

Vice-President Hubert H. Hum-
phrey said the United States
should give full support to the
United Nations in setting up a]
permanent peacekeeping force
"ready to respond and to act if
there is a threat to the peace of
the world."
WASHINGTON - Government
sources predict President John-
son's fiscal 1967 budget will Pop
the record federal spending of $105
billion to $107 billion projected
for this year. Any early tax cut
is out but an increase in taxes
I is not believed necessary.

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