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November 30, 1965 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-11-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO"
'U' PLAYERS:
Effective Direction, Revision
Mark Success of 'Henry VI'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.....

U

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 30.1965'
- .t

By GAIL BLUMBERG
Magazine Editor
Although all three parts of the
University Players' production of
Shakespeare's Henry VI are not
uniform in excellence, the trilogy,
as a whole, is highly successful.
Skillful cutting and revision of
the plays made it possible for
each one to be enjoyed and under-
stood as a unified drama, without
sacrificing the continuity of the
larger epic.'
Direction, staging and costum-
ing remained excellent throughout
the production. It is up to the
director to breathe life into the
weak and basically humorless
characters of tlese plays written
by an immature Shakespeare. The
direction here resulted in char-
acters who were well-rounded in-
dividuals, dramatically distinct
from one another ii their motiva-
tionsand actions. Not only did this
create a deeper, more compelling,
drama, but practically speaking,
it made it possible to follow the
plot developments as more natural
eyents leading from the actions of
personalities.
both the staging and costuming
also served a dual function of an
artistic and practical nature. The
costumes were extremely attrac-
tive, done in opulent velvets and
silks; not only historically ac-
curate, but appropriate to the
individual character. This appro-
priateness, as well as the use of
red and white roses pinned on
costumes, made it easier to iden-
tify the two feuding factions. The
skillful and strategic grouping of
characters on the stage served a
similar purpose.
While the acting on the part of
the major characters was uniform-
ly good, there were five character-
izations outstanding for their con-
sistency, their dramatic strength
and dynamism.
One was Richard Plantagenet,
Duke of York, played by Robert
McGill. Richard, the central figure
in the Yorkist fight for the throne,
warrier, father of two kings, is
rather a static figure in the earlier
parts of the trilogy. It isn't until
Part III that we see Richard as
an intelligent, compassionate man,
arid Robert McOill as a fine actor.
The death scene*<of Richard in

the beginning of part III is one
of the highlights of the trilogy.
Edwardine Poblocki, as Joan
Pucelle, or Joan of Arc, although
appearing only in part I, gave an
unusual and magnetic portrayal
of the mystically driven, evil maid
of France.
Albert M. Katz as the Earl of
Warwick, "maker of kings,"
handled the part of this subtle
machiavel with just enough con-
trol so that the scheming nature
of Warwick never blocked out
his respected, intelligent use of
power and his unusual and mature
insight into human nature.
Finally, Patrick McElroy as
Richard, Duke of Gloucester
(Richard III) was skillful in his
portrayal of the change in Rich-
ard from the young, intelligent,
slightly outcast son to the cun-
ning, crook-back, arch-villain of
later Shakespearean drama. The
transition, not easily credible in
reality, is extremely hard to put
across. McElroy was successful, in
a large part, because his villain
Richard still retained some of the
better qualities-the dynamism,
leadership and intelligence of the
earlier Richard. Thus the change
was not one of extremes.
Also worthy of mention were
David-Rhys Anderson, who did
a good job throughout with the
potentially dull, placid Henry VI.
Charles Patterson as Edward and
Henrietta Kleinpell as his Queen,
Lady Elizabeth Grey, Calvin Rice
as Earl of Suffolk and Richard
Esekilsen as Bishop of Winchester
were all unusually good in creating
interesting personalities.
Lillian Casey as Margaret,
Queen to Henry VI, gave rather
a mixed performance. I found that
her portrayal, while initially very
successful, became monotonous
both in voice quality and emotion-
al expression by the end of the
trilogy; Margaret became, a one-
sided character in Part III, rant-
ing raving and suffering on one
emotional level.
There is one final aspect of the
production which should be ex-
plored. Despite the exceptional
scenes of Patrick McElroy, Robert
McGill and Albert Katz, Part III
was the least successful of the
trilogy. This happened, at least
in part, because the extreme cut-

"AN ABSOLUTE KNOCKOUT OF A MOVIE!"
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V1 Ending "a tour-de
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PREMIERE-"SQUARE ROOT OF ZERO"-THURSDAY

WORKS:

1. "Three Madrigals" by Monteverdi

I

ANN ARBOR CANTATA SINGERS
RICHARD A. CRAWFORD, Conductor

ting and addition of sections of
"Richard III" compressed the ac-
tion so much that plot progres-
sion and not dramatic develop-
ment became important. The end
of the Part III, while a fitting
close to the trilogy as a whole,
did not tie together with the
beginning of Part III, in more
than the fact that it was a his-
torical progression from that
point.
Despite all flaws, Henry VI is
interesting, entertaining and at
moments reaches to excellence. If
possible, it is not to be missed.
DIAL 662-6264

I

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UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
Department of Speech
present

2. "In the Beginning" by Copland
3. "Rejoice in the Lamb" by Benjamin Britten
4. "Spanish Carols," anonymous
Rackham Lecture Hall-Friday, Dec. 3, 8:30 P.M.
Sponsored by the Office of Religious Affairs
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC WITHOUT CHARGE
This announcement through the generosity of LIBERTY MUSIC SHOP
ALL THE EXCITEMENT AND
GLITTER OF AN OEIGNGT

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HENRY VI
PARTS 1, 2, 3
NOW PLAYING IN, REPERTORY
Part 1-Dec. 2
Part 2-Nov. 30 and Dec. 3
Part 3-Dec. 1 and Dec. 5 (mat.)
8 :O P.M.-Trueblood AuditoriumI
BOX OFFICE OPEN 12:30-8:00

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TOGETHER FOR THE FIRST TIME ON THE MOTION PICTURE SCREEN'
6 Performances Only
Wednesday & Thursday
Dec. 1 and 2
Matinee Student Show Evening
1:30 * 4:30 * 8:00 p.m.
$1.50 $1.00 $2.25

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(Continued from Page 1)
In addition, he is director of
the University's free periodic
physical exams for all 2600 senior
faculty and staff members, and
director of consultation services
for the Student Health Service.
Medical School Dean William
N. Hubbard said that; Dr. Tupper's
apointment represents "an im-
portant contribution of the Uni
versity to medical education in the
United States."
Since the 19th century many
University doctors have become
deans or department chairmen at
other schools. Concerning the de-
parture of his second-in-command,
Dr. Hubbard said:
"Dr. Tupper's contribution to
medical education and the prac-
tice of medicine in Michigan has
gained him the admiration of all
those with whom he works. As a
member of the board of directors
of Michigan Blue Shield and the
scientific editor of, the journal of
the Michigan State Medical So-
ciety, his influence is felt through-
out the state of Michigan."
"The responsibility and oppor-
tunity of being the dean of a new
medical school will give Dr. Tup-
per's many talents a unique crea-
tive expression. Although he will

be sorely missed in Michigan, his
new appointment will give his
work an even wider influence and
will represent an important con-
tribution of the University to
medical education in the United
States."

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