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November 23, 1965 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-11-23

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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1965 THE MICHIGANT DAILY PAGK TH11FI~

- { ii V.A if i lA 1VLl]

a

Moyer Says

U.S. Controls Nuclear

Arms in Europe

By The Associated Press

made by the Department of De-I

WASHINGTON - The White fense with our NATO
House said yesterday that all nu- The United States
clear warheads made available to ed thousands of tac
NATO forces in Western Europe weapons in Western
are under U.S. control and cannot ticularly in Westt
be used without "specific author- recent years. And ti
ity of the President of the United ing controversy now c
States." for a NATO nuclearv
The statement issued by press in which West Ger
secretary Bill D. Moyers at John- participate.
son City,. Tex., also said that: American forces
"President Johnson is, and as West Germany are ar
vice-prefident was, fully aware of clear warheads for
the specific arrangements con- missile or aircraft.
cerning nuclear weapons control warheads have beeni

allies." ~
has- deploy-I
ctical nuclear
Europe, par-
Germany, in
here is reviv-
over proposals
weapons force
rmany would

der U.S. physical control, with
West German forces.I
According to informants here
some West German F-104 jet
fighters have been armed with nu-
clear weapons to put them in
readiness for quick action but the
airplanes so armed are under con-
stant guard of United States sen-
tries.

makers have "been largely un-
aware of the specific arrange-
ments made by the Defense De-
partment with the Allies."
In a statement apparently
prompted by the Times' dispatch,
Moyers said:
"1) As has often been stated,
we have made nuclear warheads
available to our NATO allies, but
custody of all such warheads re-
mains with the United States.
"2) President Johnson is, and as
vice-president was, fully aware
of the specific arrangements made
by the Department of Defense

with our NATO allies.
"3) As has often been stated,
no nuclear warheads on U.S. weap-
ons or held in U.S. custody for
our NATO allies can be used with-
out specific authority of the Presi-
dent of the United States."
Secretary of Defense Robert S.
McNamara told a NATO minister-
ial meeting last December that
the nuclear warheads in West Ger-
many alone had an aggregate ex-
plosive capability more than 5,-
000 times that of the Hiroshima
bomb dropped in World War II
-or approximately the equivalent

of 100 million tons of TNT. desire for a larger nuclear weap-
West German Chancellor Lud- ons role might be achieved by pro-
wig Erhard is coming to the Unit- viding what he called "closer pol-
ed States next week for talks with icy coordination" within NATO.
President Johnson on Thursday Administration policymakers in
and Friday about the long-pend- the State and Defense Depart-
ing proposals for a nuclear weap- ments generally disagree with this
ons force in which West Germany point of view, arguing that what7
would share as part owner and Germany is interested in is a share;
full participant. in defensive arrangements which
In a speech here last week Rep. would offset the estimated 700 to
Chet Holifield (D-Calif) said Ger- 800 Soviet nuclear missiles be-
many in fact already has "a strong lieved to be aimed at German
participating role in the nuclear and other West European targets.
defense of Europe." . ' Officials say A-weapons now in
Holifield suggested Germany's Germany all are battlefield types

incapable of reaching targets
within the Soviet Union.
The general U.S. policy, reaf-
firmed by the White House yester-
day, is that all such U.S. supplied
nuclear weapons remain under
U.S. physical control even though
located close to Allies' planes, guns
or missile-launchers by which they
would be used.
Since the country on whose
territory the weapons are stock-
piled also has a voice in the deci-
sion on use, this amounts to a
double veto or two-key system of
control.

The New York Times said Sun-
stationed in day in a Washington dispatch that
med with nu- the President "has been kept in-
delivery by formed of the general program"I
In addition, but that it was understood that
deployed, un- at times he and other top policy-,

'4 tt :'::i" t"1:':t::^ .. . . _ . .. .' v.. "::.

Vietnamesi
SAIGON (P)-A large force of other Viet Cong launched an at-
Viet Cong guerrillas-some appar- tack on a government regimental
ently hardened veterans-took a and artillery command post 40;
blasting from land, sea and air miles northwest of Saigon. Southj
yesterday in an attack on a South Vietnamese officials said this at-
Vietnamese ranger headquarters tack also failed and that 100
on the central coast, guerrillas were killed. There was
By nightfall, with their dead no report on government casual-
scattering the area, the enemy ties.
force pulled back in failure. Meanwhile, fighting in the
U.S. and South Vietnamese of- bloody Ia Drang Valley in the
ficials said they counted 200 Coin- central highlands apparently laps-,
munist bodies in and around the ed into a lull. There were no re-
fort at Thach Tru, 320 miles ports of activity there since clash-
northeast of Saigon. They said the es of light to moderate propor-
enemy toll may reach 400. tions erupted Sunday.E
U.S. Advisers Killed Viet Cong Hits Fort
Two U.S. Army advisers were The Viet Cong force hitting the

Blast

V

..

Attacks

Poor weather prevailing in the "A U.S. captain was shot in
early part of the attack ruled out the back with automatic weap-
any possibility of air strikes ons. A radio man was shot across
against the Communists swarm- the chest. About 4 a.m. they first
ing out of the forests and elephant started hitting us with mortars.
grass around the fort. They started coming up parallel
Four U.S. advisers with the Viet- to the road and hitting us with
namese then called for artillery small arms and automatic weap-
fire from two destroyers of the ons," McNeil said.
U.S. 7th Fleet. The fort is less Six Attacks
than 10 miles inland. "At 6 a.m. it turned daylight and
The naval bombardment helped we thought they might pull out,
the government soldiers keep the but then they made an attack
main Viet Cong force from over- and pushed us halfway back. We
See later story, Page 1 -- stopped them.
ee e"Later, when the weather clear-
running the headquarters, al- ed somewhat, U.S. and Vietnamese
though some guerrillas penetrated attack bombers and Marine arm-
the fort itself and its outer per- ed helicopters pounded the area,
imeter. dropping napalm and firing rock-
The two U.S. advisers were hit ets," he said.
on a hill outpost outside the fort. The Viet Cong launched six
"I got the s.o.b.'s that shot frontal attacks against the Viet-
them," said Staff Sgt. Henry Mc- namese and their American ad-
Neal of Pittsburgh, Pa. visers in eight hours.

,AN AMttlQAN 'TMDTIOT.

4
~- N
~'~'~1

4
r I~~
'p.'

h
;.
!
t fa

killed in the assault, sprung be-
fore dawn. Government casualties
were reported to have ranged from
light to moderate. Their exact
numbers were not released be-
cause of security regulations.
At the same time, about 1000

500-man ranger headquarters at
Trach Tru numbered about 1500.
Some wore buttons reading "Dien
Bien Phu Battalion," denoting the
Red outfit that decisively defeat-
ed the, French in that northernI
city in 1954.

INTER-A MiRICAN CONFERENCE:
Rusk Proposes Emergency Force

RIO DE JANEIRO ()-Secre- to continue helping in economic gether when a dangerous situa-;
tary of State Dean Rusk asked development of this hemisphere tion arises in the hemisphere."
the Latin-American nations yes- beyond the present 10-year per-
terday to earmark forces which iod' of the massive Alliance for Objections Raised.n
could be volunteered for interna- Progress program. Awe of oe strog atin-
tional duty in case of emergen- Rusk told the Inter-American American objections, Rusk addedA
ties. dm Conference of Foreign Miniss that "none of our governments is
At the same time, Rusk relayed that the American nations "ought prepared to engage its military
A pledge from President Johnson to be prepared to move fast and forces except by a national deci-
that the United States is willing effectively and, if possible, to- sion at the highest level, inthe
_- tight of particular circumstances."
Rusk spoke shortly after Foreign
Mnister Gabriel Valdes of Chile
rem n t es aida permanent inter-American:
Cmilitary force "in the long run
would be the prelude to the final,

In the Dominican Republic, he
asserted, "the inter-American
peace force made a vital contribu-
tion to the avoidance of blood-
shed and the creation of condi-
tions for the Dominican people to
determine their own future by
votes and not by arms."

-Associated Press

ARMY TRUCKS ARE LOADED with bodies of dead Viet Cong
after attack on Vietnamese Regimental Command Post at Dau
Tieng early yesterday was beaten off by government troops. A
reinforced Viet Cong batalion armed with mortars and recoilless
rifles staged the attack. They were forced to leave more than a
hundred dead behind after the battle.

To arrive without VILLAGER
is like not having read
"The Unbearable Bassington."
Like preferring your steak well
done, or saying "hep." It's not
fatal. It just takes you a little
longer to catch up. To learn the
ropes. On the other hand,
to arrive with VILLAGER is to
start off with a defin.ite edge,

Law Unconstitutional
WASHINGTON (P) - The Su- New York State regulation that
preme Court took a holiday season frozen stuffed turkeys must have
dip into turkey and moonshine labels showing separate weights
liquor yesterday and in doing so of fowl and filler.
struck down a federal law. The packers cited a U.S. Agri-
While disposing of this fare, culture Department requirement
the justices also told labor un- that 'the net weight of the entire
ions they must look to Congress- product be shown.
,, not to them-to lift into the fed-

capture of this hemisphere by
Communism or the establishment'
of a permanent armed camp
throughout the continent."
Foreign Minister Luis Vidal
Zaglio of Uruguay called the pres-

World News Roundup
By The Associated Press for the Advancement of Colored Speaking at the end of inter-
SANTO DOMINGO-Two small{ People. They and their families es- faith memorial services at St.
SanOd o MiNGtot osmacaped injury, despite extensive Mary's Catholic Church in Fred-
bands of conspirators tined to seize d rcsug ono ad
control of towns yesterday but damage. ericksburg, Johnon said:
both were swatted down by arm- JOHNSON CITY, Tex.-A sol- able the burden of grief that all
ed forces and polce. emn President Johnson paid tri- of us felt, but not even the pass-
In Temboril, 85 miles north of bute yesterday to the memory ing of time will dim the memory
Santo Domingo, rightists captured of John F. Kennedy. of the life'of John F. Kennedy."
a radio station and proclaimed ___
a revolutionary government.-_ --
Seven armed men held munici-T
pal authorities of the town of Jar- The Honors Steering Commrttee
b~a~n nicnr fn bhi n '

ANN ARBOR
529 E LIBERTY

BIRMINGHAM
101 TOWNSEND

If
I

eral courts union-management
disputes now heard in state * f

(

)ver;

courts.
In their last sitting before a
Thanksgiving holiday recess, the,
justices knocked out as unconsti-
tutional a law that made mere
presence at a still sufficient evi-
dence for a moonshine conviction.
Ruling SplitsCourt
In the turkey case - a dispute
between two packers and New
York State-the court went on to
set limits on cases that should be
heard by three-judge federal pan-
els.
The ruling split the court 6-3,
and Justice William O. Douglas,
on behalf of the minority, raked,
his colleagues for what he called
"unwarranted infanticide" in
striking down a 1962 ruling with
an opposite view.
Role of Circuit Court
Under yesterday's ruling, three-
judge courts properly can hear
cases only in which a "constitu-
tional issue is immediately ap-
parent." Out of bounds are so-
called supremacy cases-those in
which state law is said to be in
conflict with federal law.
Speaking for the majority, Jus-
tice John M. Harlan said that
although the work load of three-
judge courts should not be exag-
gerated, the Supreme Court was
motivated by a "concern for effi-
cient operation of the lower fed-
eral courts."
The upshot of the decision is
that it is up to the U.S. {Circuit
Court in New York City to rule
on the challenge posed by Swift &
Co., Inc., and Armour & Co., to a

out 11W1

End Gemini'
et:
Flight Halt
WASHINGTON (R) - A threat;
of delay in next month's double-'
header Gemini space spectacular
was lifted yesterday when striking
machinists agreed 'to pull down
picket lines at Cape Kennedydand
go back to work.
But members of the AFL-CIO
'International Association of Ma-
chinists remained on strike in St.'
Louis against the McDonnell Air-
craft Corp,, prime contractor for
Gemini space vehicles and produ-
cer of Phantom jet fighter planes
used in Viet Nam.
Agree Unanimously
Machinists' Vice-President Eu-
gene Glover said union negotia-
tors agreed unanimously to the-
government's back-to-work request
at Cape Kennedy while round-
the-clock talks continue to settle
the dispute over wages and work-
ing conditions.
The 17,000 machinists striking
the St. Louis plant were not af-
fected by the agreement.
Wirtz-Simkin
Secretary of Labor W. Willard
Wirtz and Chief Federal Mediator
William E. Simkin won the un-,
ion's agreement to return to work
at the Gemini launching site early
yesterday afternoon.

ent peace force in the Dominican
Republic "illegitimate" and saida
his country will continue to op-"
pose "anything which affects, in-
fringes upon or violates the prin-
ciple of non-intervention."
Presents Program
Outlining a six-point program
to strengthen the Organization of
American States, Rusk said that
in the 1962 Cuban missile crisis
and the present Dominican situa-
tion, armed forces of various
American states "were contribut-
ed voluntarily and operated col-
lectively under a combined com-
mand."
This action was decisive in the
missile crisis, Rusk said.

aoacoa prisoners zor aoout an: 1
hour before police arrived. Theyu
surrendered without incident.
CHARLOTTE, N.C.-The still-
ness of a foggy, rainy night was.
blasted apart yesterday by explo-
sions at the homes of four Negro
civil rights leaders in Charlotte.
Targets of the bombers were a
city councilman, federal court of-
ficial, dentist and the state pres-
ident of the National Association

TfE DEPUTY
by Rolf Hoch hutch

presents a Seminar on

"ui(
,!{I
. jl {
E
fii
;e II
- =',aI

Speaker:
Mon., Nov. 29th

I NGO SEI DL ER

Barbour Residenc(

L

___ _-^ =

LUNCH-DISCUSSION
TUESDAY, November 23, 12:00 Noon
U.M. International Center
SUBJECT:
"AN ENGLISHMAN'S IMPRESSION OF THE
AMERICAN EDUCATION SYSTEM"
Speaker: Prof. John W. Roche
Visiting Lecturer, School of Education
from the University of Sheffield

For reservations,
call 662-5529

Sponsored by the
Ecumenical Campus Center

I

1
t

UNIVERSITY
PLAYERS
Department of Speech

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