100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 21, 1965 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-11-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE' TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1965

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1965

NEW YORK OPERA:
Good Music, Not Good Theatre

Caiterburv House The Week To Come:
Shows Folksy Spirit A Campus Calendar
MONDAY, NOV. 22 University Players Performanr

By BETSY COHN
and MARK R. KILLINGSWORTH
Just as there was more to Car-
men than a rose and a lowered
decolletage, there is more to opera
than simply music, as the New
York City Opera company showed
last night.
Act I seemed to indicate the
anomaly of the entire perform-
ance: a rather motley crew of
soldiers and Sevillians who period-
ically divided up into easily dis-
tinguishable and fairly monoton-
ous groups. There were some ef-
Distinctive
Haircutting
for people who care!
" 6 Hairstylists
# No waiting
try
Dascola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

fective and touching musical per-
formances by the major players.
who, for the most part, distin-
guished themselves - but only by
their effective and touching musi-
cal performances, not their stage
presence.

t
1

Outstanding
Jean Sanders, as Carmen, wasl
outstanding. After a rather exag-
gerated and somewhat breathy
vocal start, she gained both musi-
cal and theatrical energy - and
was delightful in the Seguidilla'
and Duet, in which she seduces
(induces?) Don Jose into Lillas
Pastia's notorious cafe outside Se-
ville and thereafter to a life of
degeneracy, smuggling and vice.
Don Jose, played by John Crane
in Richard Cassilly's stead, was
another matter. Don Jose is fun-
damentally an obtuse, uncoordi-
nated and indecisive young soldier,
and Mr. Crane played him well,
although perhaps not altogether
intentionally.
No Joints
Julius Rudel, the conductor and
general director, and Emile Re-
nan, the stage director, apparent-
ly seem to believe that the human
anatomy has no joints. Save for
the sinuous Carmen, the charac-
ters -Don Jose suffered particu-
larly-crossed the stage not by
moving but by moulding into a
series of poses.
To be sure, "Carmen" as music
was generally excellent. Carol
Bayard, as Micaela, was touching.
as the simple country lass, who,
alas, fails to attract Don Jose's
passions. Escamillo-Sherrill. Mill-
nes-was outstanding both as a
singer' and as an actor, and was
the only completely"convincing
member of the cast. Perhaps hef

studied dance to acquire such
stage presence; suffice it to say
that both he and the dancers in
Act II's Gypsy Song were high-
lights of the performance.
Fine Performances
Frasquita, Mercedes, Remenda-
do, and Dancairo (Donna Precht,
Beverly Evans, Kellis Miller and
William Ledbetter) were good as
several of Carmen's smuggler
friends, although they had trou-
ble keeping with the orchestra in
their quintet in the second act.
But as theatre, "Carmen" was
lacking.
It did not lack for musical tal-
ent, to be sure. Micaela, Don

Jose, Escamillo and Carmen were!
all excellent singers.
"Carmen's" arias could not com-
pletely be muffled even by the
inhibited stage presentation. Mi-
caela's air, Don Jose's "La Fleur
Que Tu M'Avais Jete" and Esca-
millo's "Si Tu M'Aimes" were all
moving. And the famous Toreador+
Song and Carmen's "Habanera"
were powerful indeed.,
After some beautiful and fre-
quently passionate music, Carmen
very nearly missed dying in the:
last act.
The most unfortunate and bru-
tal fatality in the opera, how-
ever, was "Carmen" as theatre.

By FRED DONER ing the door. His name is Peter.
And if you catch his eye (he's'
"What this campus needs is a still watching the door) he'llI
good delicatessen. !ne speak friendly and tell you what's

bury House isn't a delicatessenits
a coffee house. This campus needs'
a good coffee house, too. It's got
one.
You stand outside the house
on 323 N. Division at 8:25 Friday+
or Saturday night. 8:25 because,
you know at 8:35 the place would
be filled. You stand in line al-
ternately glancing at the subdued
blue lights coming from the stage
and candle-table lights within,
and the tall, blond fellow watch-

U' Survey Research Center

ce of

To Graph Time

Expenditure

By HELEN KRONENBERG
How Americans spend their time
will be the subject of a survey to
be conducted by the Survey Re-
search Center at the University.
Parallel surveys will be made in
ten foreign countries, including
five countries behind the Iron
Curtain.
The field work for the survey in
America will consist of interview-

ers going to 1,500 households in
urban areas selected randomly
across the nation.
The survey will concern two
kinds of time measrement, Prof.
Philip Converse of the Political
Science department, said. It will
first keep track of people's time
expenditures on a particular day.
An interviewer will then return
the next day to get a more com-
plete view of that particular day.

Enquire About
Thanksgiving
Special
ECON-O-CAR
663-2033

City 'U' Officials Resign
rT1ition Cantrovprs

Uf
GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe
Monday Noon Luncheon
Nov. 22-25c
"LATIN AMERICA-AMERICAN IMAGE
As Seen by Latin American Students"'
Panel of Latin American Students

(Continued from Page 1)
fee at the traditionally tuition-
free, 118-year-old university to
finance a $400-million construc-
tion program.
Fealty
At the time of the Board of
HigherhEducation's call for "un-
divided fealty," it also reaffirmed
its "adheren,;e to the principle of
free tuition."
The board also expressed its
"regret that recent public state-
ments, made without the prior
knowledgeorapproval of this
board,; have infringed upon the
principle that this board, and not
others. is charged by law with the

"I accordingly resign from my
office as chancellor of the City
University of New York and my
position as professor of mathe-
matics, effective at once."
Meng, in his letter, said the
Board of Higher Education's reso-
lution calling for "undivided
fealty" was "vague, ambigous and
insulting," and added that, "The
'undivided fealty' of this member
may be earned but it can be
neither coerced nor purchased."
Gideonse said, "There are no
issues about 'free tuition,' of
course, since my own position on
this question has been consistent
through the years."~

Interviewers will try to find out
if the day is typical of the year's
activities. Annual vacations and
other seasonal differences are two
factors that will concern the in-
terviewers.
In addition to the 1,500 select-
ed households across the nation,
500 homes in Jackson, Michigan,
will be studied extensively. This is
being done to accommodate some
of the European nations that are
not in a position to take a na-
tional survey. Prof. Converse not-
ed that such a survey requires a
large investment to maintain a
paid staff of interviewers.
The researchers chose Europeank
cities on such criterion as size and
industrialization. Jackson, Mich-
igan, was one of the American
cities that fit the same criterion.
Osnabruck, West Germany, and
Gyor, Hungary, are two of the
European cities that will be
studied.
Although the interviewing will
be finished in February, it will
take two or three months to code
and prepare the data for process-
ing, Prof. Converse noted. Some
time before summer the analysis
of the data will begin. The data
will then be duplicated for the re-
search institutes of the other
participating nations.
"The information from this
study offers good opportunitiesfor
social scientists to actually com-,

in store. Then it happens. You're)
inside, seated right comfortable
in the cozy room with Al Lov-
ing's painting on the wall. Wild
colors. And then somebody says,
hey, there's Ed. It's Ed Reynolds.1
He runs the place. He also per-
forms on guitar . . . he and his
wife, Pat. She's pretty.
And then you see this guy with
a white collar come buzzin through
the place. And then what's he
doing here anyway? It's his place,
says Ed. The Canterbury House!
was originally for Friends, you
see. Friends of the St. John's Epis-
copal Church next door. Rev. Dan
Burke and Martin Bell are the
preachers.
Rev. Dan climbs on stage, lights
a cigarette, and whips out his
Ferlinghetti while John Miller
plays his own kind of poetry on
bass behind him: Ta-thum, thum,
thum, thum, thum ... and then it
happens again. The Rev's off and
Ed Reynolds on with Pat.
Ed prepares to play, Pat pre-
pares her golden voice (she's pret-
ty), and the cooks in the kitchen
prepare sloppy Joes for the wai-
tress trays. Then it happens again
.. everyone heads for the small
doorway to the big room at once
for the next set. There's a big
clashat the door, leaving Pat
singing "Sloppy Joe Blues," Ed
with a reverend's collar, the Rev-
erend with Ed's sweatshirt, and'
the waitresses serving guitar string
soup. "So vat's wrong with guitar-
string Zoup?" says a customer.
Nothing. Like I say. What this
campus needs is a good delicates-
sen. You've got one, the Canter-
bury House.

DIAL 5-6290
Nanny had been in
the family for years.
Then, two died
mysteriously.
Two lived in terror.
Nanny wasn't
responsible . . . was she?
a

4:10 p.m.-David Sylvester, art
critic, will speak on "Alberto Gia-
cometti" in Aud. B.
8 p.m.-Department of Speech
University Players Performance of
Shakespeare's "Henry VI Part III"
will be given in Trueblood Aud.
8:30 --p.m. - School of Music
Composers Forum will be held at
the Recital Hall, School of Mu-
sic.

TUESDAY, NOV. 23 5 p.m.-Thanksgiving Recess be-
8 p.m.-Department of Speech gins.
The University of Michigan
Gilbert and Sullivan Society
Presents
I',ate4 "( Pejance,
December 1, 2, 3, 4
Tickets on Sale 9 A.M-5 P.M.
Nov. 29-30; Dec. 1-4-Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Wed. and Thurs. Performances-$1.50
Fri, and Sat. Performances-$2.00
Sat, Matinee Sold Out
How to get to
Britain next summer
-a travel guide Jbr students
You'd like to go to Britain, but your parents blanch at the
cost? Here's a way to convince them it needn't be allthat
much.
1. Mail the coupon. It will bring you 8 free booklets on
Britain. One of them has tips on group travel and inex-
pensive ways of crossing the Atlantic.
2. Decide how long you want to stay, then use the book-
lets to work out living costs. Examples: bed and breakfast
in college halls of residence cost between $2 and $4.50;
in Youth Hostels-under $1. You can get a good lunch in
a pub, or dinner in a restaurant, for around $1,
3. Add costs for getting about. The booklets report on
bargains like 900 miles of rail travel for $30, buses that
go everywhere for 2# a mile.
4. Put plays and festivals on your schedule. You can af-
ford to. London theatre seats start at 42. Tickets for the
Shakespeare season (at Stratford-upon-Avon from April
to November) start at 70.
5. See your travel agent for information on student tours.
Then present your budget to your parents at some well-
chosen moment. (Hint: Christmas is coming.)
----CLIP COUPON FOR FREE STUDENT'S TRAVEL KIT----
British Travel Association
680 Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10019
(Name
(Please print clearly)
College
Addressf
City State Zip
f..--_--.------- --- ----------

Shakespeare's "Henry VI Part III"
will be given in Trueblood Aud.
8:30 p.m.-University Music So-
ciety will perform Grand Ballet
Classique de France at Hill Aud.
8:30, p..-David Polosky, clar-
inetist, will give his School of
Music degree recital at Recital
Hall, School of Music.

' ;

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 24

0
$
E

II

U I

I'M MAY,
JANE'S MOTHER.
WHAT DOES IT AU.
MEAN... THE
SQUARE ROOT
OF ZERO
grooviemovie

sole responsibility for governingObjection
the City University and promul- His chief objection was to ihe
gating its basic policies." Iphrase "undivided fealty," he said.
gTingbordsitste ubic "Fealty is a medieval concept,"
The board said the public Gideonse said in his letter, ::and
roneous and unintended impres- it describes the position of a
sion in some quarters that this medieval lord in relations to his
board has changed, or was about feudal serfs.
to change, its firm policy with re- er "Members of the Board of High-
spect to such free tuition.",er Education are not, medieval
spect tosuchflords-and I am not inclined to
Bowker's brief, two - paragraph become a serf."
resignation said: "When the chief
administrative officer of a uni-
versity finds that, however un-
justifiedly, his board of trustees
has manifested a lack of confi-
dence in him, it is my judgmentj o /
that his real usefulness t3 the HERE COMES
university is at an end, and he
should resign. Any-night girls and o'
__.._s. ----_ _ - 1 .__ I - - - - '- - -+Ift " l n

K

a

I

pare how life in the United States
differs from life in other countries
on both sides of the Iron Curtain,"
IProf. Converse explained. "More-
over, many people in less fortu-
nate countries are really interest-
ed in how Americang actually do
spend their time and inhow their
lives compare wtih those of peo-
ple with similar backgrounds in
America."
ENDING TUESDAY
Shows at 1:00
3:00-5:00-7,:00 & 9:00
E SPEED aREED!
ivernight glory-.
the limit!

0'

L

. . ,

"AN ABSOLUTE KNOCKOUT OF A MOVIE!"
--Bosley Crowther, N.Y. Times

I

I

PH. 483-4680
Enrance On CARPENTER RODB
FREE CAR HEATERS
ENDS TONIGHT

ine~y pre[s emWi dtoL

I

I

44/Li/EB MEMOB148LE
1141//SPSORTHA/f
-W as 7
Also
Cartoon &News
COMING
"The BEDFORD
INCIDENT"

ROMAN POLANSKI'S
HELD OVER"a tour-
_______________________force of se
and suspe
Flawless!"

I

LIVING IT P~r
YECRifOLOF Qi7QR'
"PAR HERS"
BOX OFFICE OPEN 6:30
CLOSED
MON. and TUES.

I

ALL THE EXK
GLITTER OF
MARGOT FONTEYN
TOGETHER FOR THE FIRST TI

1

Z

e-
Anse.!

Read and Use Daily Classified Ads
;ITEMENT AND
, RUDOLPH NUREYEV-
ME ON THE MOTION PICTURE SCREEN!
my
day
Evening
8:00 p.m.
$2.25
.K.

m.__ -

-Life

! ;""____w______"""""_______________________________
1[
1 [
I. 1
[ U
1, [
1 I
[ [
I [
[ 1
[ 1
1 [
1 I
Strrn AnaUan
I [

i

I

I

6 Performances Or
Wednesday & Thurs
Dec. 1 and 2
Matinee Student Show
1 :30 4:30
$1.50 $1.00

STUDENT BOOK SLRVILC

.. ..

{
I
i

i r

..*.*.~.*' MM

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan