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November 17, 1965 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-11-17

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1965

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1965

MOSCOW PHILHARMONIC:
Underdog' Svetlano
With Life, Bests IKo

IN MAGNA CARTA ESSAY:
Kamisar Contrasts Station-Courtroom Procedures

v Directs
-9 -9

By JEFREY CHASE
Program
Moussorgsky-Shostakovich: Pre-
lude to Khocantschina
Rachmaninoff: Symphonic
Dances, Op. 451
Mendelssohn: Violin Concerta in
E minor, Op. 64
Debussy: La Mer (The Sea)
From Dawn till Noon on the
Sea
Sport of the Waves
RARELY PERFORMED:

Dialogue of the Wind and Sea
A concert is only as good as theI
musical knowledge of the man in
charge.
It is not enough for the orches-
tra to make lovely sounds; thati
man in charge must know how
those "lovely sounds" fit into the
scheme of the music being per-:
formed.
With this second performance of
the Moscow Philharmonic Orches-

'U' Players To present
'Henry VP in Repertory

rh The hypocrisy which has long "In the courtroom, the defend- to remain silent, his interrogators of the most truly libertarian clause bar who have come to accept the
n d r sh " prevaded our criminal procedure ant is presumed innocent; in the simply will not let him." of the Fifth Amendment'." many procedural rights surround-
is dramatized by comparing the police station, the proceedings us- Kamisar writes that "police in- Show in the Gatehouse ing the accused in the "mansion"
contrasting conditions in "the ually begin, 'All right-we know terrogators may now hurl jolting Kamisar indicates that what are bitterly resisting the "exten-
tra-last evening, with Igor Ois- gatehouse" (police station) and you're guilty; come through and questions where once they swung the landmark 1964 case of Esco- sion" of these rights to the "gate-
trakh, solo violinist-one is of- "the mansion" (courtroom) in the it'll be easier for you'." telephone books, may now play on bedo vs. Illinois and other recent house."
fered an opportunity for close day-to-day operation of criminal While the accused has his law- the emotions where once they re- confession cases signify Is that the
range comparison of two men's law. yer at his side in the courtroom, sorted to physical violence." But, U.S. Supreme Court's focus has Escobedo Case
control over the same ensemble Prof. Yale Kamisar of the Lawin the police station the suspect it is no less true today than it shifted from the show in the The Escobedo case may mark
in the same hall and before a School points out these differ- usually neither has, nor is advis- was 30 years ago, that, quoting "mansioi" to the show in the a new chapter in constitutional-
similar audience. ences and their legal implications ed of his right to get counsel. Ernest J. Hopkins, 'in every city "gatehouse." criminal procedure which the court
Kondrashin Mediocre in the lead essay of "Criminal No Silence our police hold what can only be However, 1 a w enforcement cannot yet agree how to write,
Monday evening conductor Kir- Justice in Our Time." In themansion, the accused not called outlaw tribunals-informal spokesmen and members of the points out Kamisar.
it Kondrashin led the orchestra to' Magna Carta Essays only need not answer questions, and secret inquisitions of arrested - -___---___________________-_____
only mediocre results ,often mask- The collection of Magna Carta unless chosen to take the stand persons-which are, terminology
ing the real meaning of the mu- Essays has just been published in he may not be asked any. The aside, actual and very vigorous
sic in affective or crude color high- honor o fthe 750th anniversary of gatehouse scene shows a different trials of crime . . . Centering all
lighting of the instrumental Magna Carta by the University picture. "Even if the suspect is upon the confession, proud of it, !h Un of kAh
sounds..Press of Virginia. that rare and troublesome type staking everything upon it, the T e Iersity e M ICUI9O
Conductor Evgeni Svetlanov In the gatehouse, writes Kami- who knows of (he is likely not to major cannon of American police
showed us on Tuesday evening sar, "the enemy of the state is a be told) and insists on his right work is based upon nullification Gilbert and Sullivan Society
that a performer need not __ _ __ _ __ __ __ OlusUarf
depersonalized subject to be sized
fice opulence of color for clarity
of line and projection of musical up and subjected to interrogation
meaning in form. Music- is a liv- tactics and techniques most ap- Presents
ing art and the listener only knows propriate for the occasion. He isT
what is communicated by under- game to be stalked."
standing what is being built to By contrast, "once he leaves the
and what is done once the apex 'gatehouse' and enters the 'man- 6
has occurred. sion'--if he ever gets there (most
Too many performers miss the defendants plead guilty and don't)
forest for the trees. -the enemy of the state is re-
Many people, if they had to personalized, even dignified, thejM A SS tM EETIN G
choose between the two concerts, public invited, and a stirring cere-
probably elected to attend the mony in honor of individual free-
Kondrashin-conducted one be- dom from law enforcement cele- Tickets on Sale9A .A. P.M .
cause that man is better known brated." Sunday Nov. 21-7:30 P.M
in this country; but, alas, it Court vs. Station Nov. 17-19; 22-4--SAB
was the underdog - Svetlanov - The conflict of interest between LEAGUE BALLROOM Nov. 1-19; D-2-SA
who scored ahead from the out- the accused and the state in the Nov. 29-30; Dec. 1-4--Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
set and maintained his lead to the courtroom is mediated by an im- Wed. and Thurs. Performances-$1.50
end. partial judge, but in the police
Rachmaninoff station, "although the same con- To- nJFri. and Sat. Performances-$2.00
The Rachmaninoff Symphonic flict exists in more aggravated I To Be nnounceC Sat. Matinee-$1.00
Dances offer ample opportunity form, the law passes it by," points I
for the makings of a cheap, melo- out Kamisar.

p

By LINDA WALZER
Shakespeare's "Henry VI" will,
be presented in repertory No-
vember 17 through December 5 in
Trueblood Auditorium by the Uni-
versity Players. Because of the
huge technical demands of the
script and the many complex ma-,
nipulationsinvolved, the play is
rarely performed in full. This isj
thought to be the fifth time a
complete threenpart sequence has
been given in one season.
Robert BcGill, Grad, who plays
the Duke of York and is the!
business manager, describes "Hen-
ry VI" as a study of period, not
of individual characters. Many
small roles are very important to
the play, he says. The play in-
volves many battle scenes: over
200 costumes and 40 sets of ar-
mor are used. Ross Young, Grad,
is the costume technician and pro-1
vided these. The play is jointly
directed by William P. Halstead
and Richard Burgwin, with the as-
sistance of Claribel Baird. They
are all professors in the Depart-
ment of Speech.
Martha Patterson, promotions
director of the UP, states that
many battle scenes included in the
original play are cut out of this
presentation, for the reason that
they are unnecessary and unde-
cisive. In addition, some 300 lines
of "Richard III," a later play by
. Shakespeare, have been included
as an epilogue. By this addition,
it is believed that the story will
be rounded out and many ques-
tions answered.

"Henry VI" has been criticized
by many people. For a long time.
the authorship has been in doubt.
Now, it is generally accepted that
the plan and the majority of the
writing is by Shakespeare, Mrs.
Patterson said. The play is one
of Shakespeare's first and is some-
times called the work of an im-
mature playwright. Mrs. Patterson
states that, although the poetry
involved is not as in later works,
his sense of theatricality or his
ability to dramatize were alreadyI
present. This is evidenced through
the moving scene where a father
finds he has killed his son and a
son finds out he has killed his

father. This, she states ,is per-
haps the most beautiful scene in!
the play. Mrs. Patterson added
that she believes the cutting and
the adding of an epilogue has
helped to make the important
scenes stand out.
Because the complicated chron-
ology tends to become confusing
at times. it is honed that a large3

dramatic monstrosity, but in the
hands of Maestro Svetlanov they
emerged as a rythmically vital
piece with fine sense of form and
line.
One couldn't help notice the
tympanist, especially during his
solo in the first movement. And
again in La Mer the most was
Imade of the "kitchen cabinet"-I

tapestry hung on the stage which but always in the best of taste.
follows the family tree from Ed- Many might have been surpris-
ward III through Edward IV and ed to hear the alto saxopohone
Richard III will enable the audi- solo in the Rachmaninoff. No,
ence to follow it more easily. A classical composers are not prej-
second tapestry locates the geo- udiced if the sound fits!
graphical action of the play in Igor Oistrakh, son of David, did
France and Europe. an admirable job with the Men-
This will be the first play of the delssohn concerto, especially in the
year for the University Players, final movement, which moved in
who ordinarily present seven ma- a very molto vivace allegro. Son
jor productions in the winter and Igor is in an unfortunate situa-
five in the summer session, with tion, however, because he will be
two recently added for the spring forever compared to his father,
session. This is the 25th Shake- thought by many to be the finest
spearean play to be presented. violinist presently concertizing.

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