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November 17, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-11-17

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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAVIR VpR'VV

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1965 THE 3IICIIIGAN DAILY I~ A f1t~ p31TT~tE, A C1~AZ~. ~Z1Z~.LL

VAIUL TUREE

5

L eaders Cha
By The Associated Press ty but human ability-not just
WASHINGTON-Civil rights ac- equality as a right and a theory,
tion took place on several fronts but equality as a fact and as a
yesterday as leaders of the move- result," he said then.
ment met with government off- On the eve of the planning ses-
cials to chart a course for fu- sion's start, the American Friends
tore efforts. Service Committee and the Na-
tur efors.tional Association for the Ad-
M e a n w h i 1 e, in Minneapolis, vancement of Colored People's Le-
John A. Hannah, presidentdof gal Defense and Education Fund
Michigan State University, told a released far-ranging recommen-
convention of college administra- dations for further enforcement of"
tors that they have no choice but Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights
to lead the fight for civil rights Act to speed school desegregation.
in this country. Some civil rights leaders have
The Washington sessions will indicated there is little more that
make plans for the White House can be done by legislation after
conference scheduled next spring, enactment of the 1964 Civil Rights
"to fulfill these rights." The con- Act and the 1965 Voting Rights
ference takes as its theme Presi- Act.
dent Johnson's statement in a But many of these same leaders
speech at Howard University last voice concern over slaying of civilj
June 4. rights workers in the South where
"We seek not just freedom but alleged perpetrators have gone un-
opportunity-not just legal equi- punished.

rt

Future. of

Civil Rights
The report said there is a "po- cies--not all our community re-
tential danger in mounting des- lations commissions, not all of our
pair with democratic processes legislatures, not all of our federal
when Negroes see federal laws, government-can master such an
regulations and court orders fla- array of brilliant and useful tal-
grantly or subtly violated and ob- ent."

I-

I

A FUNNY THING
HAPPENED ON THE
WAY TO THE FORUM

The Civil Rights Commission's
recommendations are designed to
improve this situation.
Conference leaders say the two-
day sessions will be the first time
all civil rights groups, from the
most radical to the most conserv-
ative, have sat down with gov-
ernment officials and said, in ef-
fect, "What do we do now?"
"This country is past the point
of, no return in civil rights," ex-
plained Berl I. Bernhard, former
staff director of the Civil Rights
Commission who heads the plan-
ning conference staff. "There is
a definite commitment to secur-
ing equal rights for all. The ques-
tion now is how to do it."
Bernhard said the plan is to
have both open sessions and clos-
ed "brainstorming" meetings
where all sorts of ideas will be
tossed about.
"We won't rule out anything in

the discussions," Bernhard said.
The recommendations on school
desegregation were made in a news
conference and were directed to
Secretary of Welfare John W.
Gardner.
They came as a result of a
study by the American Friends
Service Committee and the NAACP
Legal Defense and Educational
Fund.
The organization said the gov-
ernment's enforcement of Title
VI so far has resulted in "paper
compliance and continued segre-
gation." They said their study
supported the finding of the
Southern regional council that
"fewer than 6 per cent of the
Deep South's Negro pupils are in
desegregated situations. This ist
not just a statistic. This is a hu-
man tragedy."

'a
R
u
'h
't(
I
,
ItI

serve federal officials too timid, Hannah also emphasized that
inwilling or powerless to enforce the land-grant institutions were
'hem." established more than a century
In Minneapolis. Hannah, who ago "specifically to serve the un-
also is chairman of the U.S. Civil derprivileged of that day - the
Frights Commission, said, "Public sons of formers, and mechanics
universities would disown their and shopkeepers who were being
heritage and deny their purpose denied equal opportunity for lib-
f now they were to remain aloof. eral and practical education."
[hey are and must be in the fight That, he said, "should give us
o the end." all of the justification we heed
In an address to the annual con- for undertaking this new assign-
vention of the National Associa- ment."
ion of State Universities and Hannah said, "a year ago. 42
Land-grant Colleges, Hannah said major public institutions of high-
)nly the public and private uni- er learning were segregated. By
versities have the resources to do latest count, only seven have now
he job that needs to be done. failed to assure the federal gov-
"No other combination of agen- ernment that they will not dis-
criminate in the admission or
treatment of students."
The real problems of civil rights
are to be found in the East and
fl~North and West as well asin the
South, Hannah said, and they
must be dealt with on a statewide'
basis.
"The civil rights problem must -
be solved where it is," he said.
"This throws the problem di-
rectly back to us in the state
S universities and land-grant col-
S leges, to us who boast that the
u r i s boundaries of the campus are the,
boundaries of the state, and that
we are the servants of all of the
people."

SOPH
SHOW
'65

1:'f

Good Tickets Available
For Thursday Night
1.50 1.75, 2.00

Johnson

Seeks

Legi Si

To G
.
Bishops Pass
Statement on
Birth Control
Ecumenical Council
Clears Declarations
On Racism, Atheism
VATICAN CITY (P)--Key decla-
rations on birth control, racial
discrimination and atheism clear-
ed major hurdles yesterday at the
Vatican Ecumenical Council
In a series of votes as they
rushed to wind up work on their
controversial scheme on modern
world problems, the council
fathers meeting in St. Peter's:
-Approved a statement on
birth control that stresses con-
jugal love in marriage as an ele-
ment important not only for
bringing children into the world
but as a physical expression of
mutual love between husband and
wife.
-Accepted a strong declaration:
against racial discrimination. The
w declaration rules out gradual ap-
proach to the elimination of the!
problem and insists that discrim-
ination must be "crushed and re-
moved" as an offense to God.
-Quashed an 11th-hour con-
servative demand to include an
open condemnation of commu-
nism in its approved text on
atheism. The text calls for a
dialogue between the Roman
Catholic Church and all nonbe-
lievers, and pointedly singles out
neither Marxism nor Communism
by name.
The part of the birth control
statement emphasizing conjugal
love has been considerably ex-
panded from an earlier version.
Council experts said it incorpor-
ates views of Paul Emile Cardinall
Leer of Montreal.
Last year and during this coun-
cil session, the Canadian cardinal
spoke out for a new view of mar-
riage to accept the idea that
physical love is an essential mar-
ital element, by which couples
express their love and respect for
each other.
Many theologians regard this
concept as pointing the way to
acceptance in the Church of the
idea that sex in itself is a funda-
mental good in marriage. A{
couple's canner of acting together1
must be based not only on good
intention but on "objective cri-
teria founded on the dignity of
the human person to achieve mu-
tual love and procreation."
It adds that couples must not
use any means specifically pro-
hibited by the Church.

uarantee

Fair

J

Order Your Daily Now-
Phone 764-0558

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Asks To End
Injustiee In
Ner o T rials

f''rr
f I M .

Y1

President To Request
New Law at January
Session of Congress
WASHINGTON (R) - President
Johnson said yesterday he will
ask Congress in January for leg-
islation "to prevent injusticeto
Negroes at the hands of all-
white juries."
"We intend to make the jury
box, in both state and federal
courts, the sacred domain of jus-
tice under law," Johnson said. 'T

We cordially invite the Michigan students to attend
an Ope"z House at our .home on South University,
Nov. 17 from 4:00-6:00 P.M.
All students are particularly encouraged to attend.
Casual dress.
President and Mrs. Hatcher

A
' '
'
r4
Ml
i
1
1

He spoke to delegates here to
plan for a White House civil
rights conference next spring.
Johnson described the jury as
"the cornerstone of our system of
justice," adding:
"If its composition is a sham,
its judgment is a sham. And when
that happens, justice itself is a
fraud, casting off the blindfold
and tipping the scales one way
for whites and another way for
Negroes."
Johnson noted that the govern-
ment has already moved to join
in three suits which, he said, chal-
lenge a biased system of jury se-j
lection. These actions include one
in Lowndes County, Ala., and are
based on the contention that Ne-
groes have been deliberately ex-
cluded from jury service.
Then he said he has asked the
attorney general "to prepare jury
legislation that is clear in itsI
purpose and specific in its aim."
Johnson said the work of the
civil rights conference "will affect
the future of over 200 million
people."
The President said that "each
life lost through racial hatred,
each life diminished by blind prej-
udice, saps the strength of a
great nation."
While more -than 200,000 Ne-
groes have been registered to vote
under the 1965 Voting Rights Act,
Johnson said many hundreds of
thousands have not.;

House Minority Leader

Ap
w

RAL

OR

(R-Grand Rapids)
addresses the University Community
Thursday, Nov.,18 in the Michigan
League Ballroom at 8:00 p.m.

N

World News Roundup

i
I
i
i
i

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-The govern-
ment and the major producers
reached general agreement yes-
terday on the disposal of the
government's 1.4-million tons of
surplus aluminum, the Defense
Department announced.
The Pentagon said that repre-
sentatives of the General Services
Administration, Defense Depart-
ment and the producers agreed "in
principle that the industry will
purchase the surplus aluminum
at an average rate of not less
than 100,000 tons peryear or the
defense requirement, whichever is
greater."
UNITED NATIONS--Secretary-
General U Thant called yesterday
for major concessions by all par-
ties to build a favorable political

and psychological climate for a

Viet Nam settlement.
He suggested that
scale fighting of today
been averted.

the large-
might have

sity of Chile yesterday. He had!
been warned by student leaders to
stay away.
* * *
IA DRANG VALLEY, South Viet
Nam-Two U.S. battalions pulled
out of the Ia Drang Valley early
today after killing 869 North Viet-
namese troops in three days of
bloody fighting near the Cambod-
ian border.

co-sponsors:

UAC and College Republicans

CONCEPCION, Chile - Angry
leftist students spat on U.S. Sen.
Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY) and
threw eggs, rocks and money at
him when he visited the Univer-

U

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