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November 14, 1965 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-11-14

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 14, I i8' . x

I

PAOE TWO' THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 14.. 1985

F-

Preminger' s Bunny'
Won't Raise a Hair,

BLOODY ENTERTAINMENT:
Repulsion' Provides Shocks

Of Horses, Wild and Wooden:
Fournier To Lead 'U' Orchestra

By PAUL SAWYER
At The Michigan
With "Bunny Lake Is Missing,"
Otto Preminger returns to mystery
films for the first time since
"Anatomy of a Murder." "Bunny
Lake" is not an especially good
example of its kind, butt -it has
some fine touches, particularly a
harrowing climax that, for pure
audience-torture, ranks with sorn
of Hitchcock's better moments.
"The Ipcress File,"' with its aim-
less, leisurely beginning and its,
horibly nerve-wracking climax'
that ends too abruptly, is a per-
feet pa'ody of the plot conven-
tions in "Bunny Lake." The title
character is apparently the four-
year-old daughter of an Atnerican
couple, played by Carol Lynley
(tolerably) ahd Keir Dullea (not
very well), Bunny has disappeared
from a nursery school. Strangely
enough, the police (notably Laur-
ence Olivier, wasted in an innocu-
ous role) can find no evidence
that the girl actually exists; and
as the plot thickens, no motives
or serious suspects can be found.
But the mother is too distraught
to be lying, so Dullea, who is ac-'

tually her brother, becomes .the
new focus of suspicion. I am not
divulging anything,.anyone exper-
ienced in recognizing film types
and conventions.should 'have sus-
pected him from the .beginning.
This gradual Hitchcockian deep-
ening of puzzlement :is the best
part of the script. The, trouble is
that it takes Preminger. an hour
and a half to develop it. The first
25 minutes alone are spent in
finding out what we already know
about Bunny by virtue of the title.
An even greater flaw lies in .the
script, which drags in, solely for.
laughs, three or four tedious ec-
centrics 'right dout of George S.
Kaufman. Noel Coward is not only
wasted but thoroughly degraded
as one of: these,k a lecherous old
masochist who refers to the Mar-
quis de Sade as -"the master." All
this fails to mask the film's essen-
tial paucity of plot material..
The excitement starts in the
last 20 minutes, and from then on,
Preminger is on fairly steady
ground. There is some very clever
camera work in the splendid cli-
mactic scene mentioned above, and
Dullea the stony-faced maniac is
much more effective than Dullea
the intense young Journalist.

By ALAN J. GLUECKMAN
At The Campus Theater
How do you like your thrills?
If you like your movies with the
savage bite of a sharp-edged
straight razor slashing across the
back of your neck, you'll be at-
tracted to "Repulsion," now at
the Campus Theatre.
Make no mistake about it be-'
fore you go in, this is the blood-
iest evening's entertainment since
Alfred Hitchcock's "Psycho." In
fairness to director Roman Polan-
ski .you really shouldn't compare
the two films. While they both
concern psychopaths and multiple
murders, "Repulsion" is not strict-
ly a suspense thriller, and it cer-
tainly isn't a mystery.
Rights'from the first frame of
film you know something is wrong
with the dazzling blond heroine,
Carol, played by Catherine Den-
euve, the beautiful French star of
"The Umbrellas of Cherbourg."
The camera holds a tight closeup
of Miss Deneuve's right eye star-
ing blankly, just staring, as the
titles unfold.
From this grotesque beginning,
director Polanski leads the viewer
through the labyrinth of a psy-

chotic personality as it grows
steadily more aberrant and fin-
ally disintegrates, culminating in
one of the most violent homicides
ever portrayed on the screen.
Suspense steadily m o u n t s
through each new addition to
Carol's deviant behavior. It would
be unfair to chronicle here the
bits and pieces, the little shocks,
that build the tension and bring
the audience to wonder, with quite
a bit of apprehension, indeed ter-
ror, what will happen next.
Men Repulsive
It is possible to say that Carol's
basic problem is that men repulse
her; she fears that every man she
sees is going to rape her. Yet cer-
tain masculine objects attract her.
In fact, she has this fatal fasci-
nation for a straight razor.
As Carol's personality degener-
'ates, the audience is swept inside
her mind; Polanski subjects the
audience to the same fantasies, the
same vague terrors, the same
frightening distortions of reality
that engulf the heroine. Soon,
like Carol, you can't distinguish
between what's real and what's
not. Men attack her. Hands clutch
at her. Walls envelop her. And
soon the blood begins to flow.
Technically, the picture is fault-
less. The visual images are stun-

ning; the editing is fast-paced and
adds to the shocks. The sound
track is the most frightening of
all: either silence or the everyday
sounds of life-clocks ticking,
footsteps, telephones ringing, wa-
ter dripping, traffic, all become
magnified and distorted until they
pervade the entire consciousness.
,What makes Carol psychotic? Po-
lanski puts enough clues in the
film to keep audiences arguing
for some time to come. It is in
fact this attention to detail which
makes the picture difficult to
compare with "Psycho."
Hitchcock set out to make a
mystery and, to keep it mysterious,
had to conceal the facts. Polan-
ski set out to make a stunning
study of psychosis, and thus had
to throw the mystery out. Happily,
he kept the terror in.
You'll be talking about this film
for weeks. Don't miss it, unless
you like to sleep at night.

By MARK R. KILLINGSWORTH
"I've always felt it's better to
tame a wild horse than to try to
liven a wooden one," Serge Four-
nier, the guest conductor of the
University Symphony Orchestra in
its concert this evening, comment-
ed in a recent interview.
And Fournier doesn't seem to
mind the fact that his new or-
chestra may at times be a wild
horse. He seems to enjoy it.
True, at one rehearsal last week,
he stopped the orchestra, which
was rapidly being outdistanced by
an overzealous trombonist, and
frowned.
Togetherness
"Let's get excited-but together,"
he said.
But he added afterward, "The
main thing is that everyone in this
orchestra is not yet spoiled by the
job of being a musician. Everyone

is so willing to produce. Everyone
still likes music in this orchestra."
Adding that he is enjoying his
guest conducting activities, Four-
nier said, "I don't feel that far
from many of the orchestra mem-
bers, perhaps because I've tried
-to keep that musical joie de vivre."
No Stranger to Travel'
Fournier, in his guest role at
the University, is no stranger to
travel, Born in France, he studied
with the Paris Conservatoire for
ten years, was a flutist in the
Orchestra Lamoureux and spent a
season-as successor to Pierre
Boullez, the famous avant-garde
conductor--leading the Theatre de
France's Compagnie Madeline Re-
naud-Jean Louis Barrault.
In 1961, Fournier came to
Tanglewood at the invitation of
Boston Symphony Orchestra con-
ductor Charles Munch, whom
Fournier had met in Paris, and

I - I

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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of MWichigan,'"for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-.
ial responsibility. Notices should beI
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day,
Calendar items appear once only.,
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 14
DCay Calendar
Professional Theatre Program Per-
formance-APA Company in Archibald
MpLeish's "Herakles": Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre, 2:30 and 8 p.m. '
Programmed Learning for Business
Workshop-Michigan Union, 5 p.m.1
Cinema Guild - Experimental Film
Program Number Two:'- Architecture
Auditorium, 7 and 9 p.m.-'
School of Music University Symphony'
Orchestra Concert - Serge Fournier,
guest conductor, Hill Aud., 8:30 p.m.
Events Monday
University Management Seminar -
"The Disciplinary Process and Griev-
ance Handling": Michigan Union, 8:30
a.m.
Center for Programmed Learning for'
Business Workshop-"Subject Matter
Analysis": Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICE
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and. registered.student orga-
nizationsonly. Forms'are available in
Room 1011 SAB.
, , ,
Gamna Delta, International Luther-
of "Images of the Church" at 6:45.
All welcome. 1511 Washtenaw.
* * *
Guild House, Monday noon luncheon,
"Africa: Problems of Colonialism,",
Harrison Muyla, lecturer, president of
African Student Union in Michigan,
Nov. 15, 12-1 p.m., Guild House, 802
Monroe.
4** *
Inter-Quadrangle Council, Meeting
of all house presidents, Nov. 15, 9
p.m., 3511 SAB.
La Cociedad Hispanica, Tertulia, lunest
3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg. Vengan to-
dos.
Lutheran Student Chapel, Worship
services, 9:30 and 11 a.m., Sun., Nov.
14; 7 p.m., discussion led by Rev. Edgar'
Edwards on "The Morality of War with
Reference to Viet Nam." Lutheran:Stu-
dent Chapel, Hill St. at Forest Ave.
Newman Student Association, Inter-
national supper, Nov, 14, 6.15 'p.m., 331
Thompson.
UAC - Academic Affairs Committee,
Last Chance Lecture Series, Dean, Robb.
ertson speaking, Nov. 15, 7:10 p.m.,
Michigan Room of the League. -
* * *
.University Lutheran Chapel, Sunday
services, Nov. 14, 9:45 a.m., speaker,
Rev. Alfred T. Scheips; 11:15 a.m.,
speaker, Rev. Theophil Voss of Dear-
born and installation of Rev. Theodore
Scheidt. Bible class 9:45 a.m., "The
Strength of Weakness," II Cor. 12.' All
welcome, University Lutheran Chapel,.
1511 Washtenfw.

Engineering Seminar-David A. Ev-
enson, "Nonlinear Flexural Vibrations
of 'Thin Circular Rings": 1504 E. En-
gineering, 4 p.m.
School of Education Lecture-Ellis
Dillon, author of children's books, "The
Hows and Whys of Writing for Chil-
dren": Rackham, Amphitheatre, 4:15
p.m.
'Last Chance:Lecture-James H. Rob-
ertson, associate dean, College of Lit-
eratuire, Science, and Arts: Michigan
League, 7:10 p.m.
University Musical Society Concert -'
Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra, Kiril
Kondrashin, conductor: Hill Aud., 8:30
p.m. --
General Notices
Doctoral Examination for Marjorie
Louise Bissett, Epidemiologic Science;
thesis: "A Study of the Interaction of
Simian Virus 40 with Human Cells kin
Vitro'," Mon., Nov. 15, 2022 School of
Public Health, at 2 p.m. Chairman,
F. E. Payne.
Recreational Leadership and Aquatic
Leadership: Women students interest-
ed in these classes which are offered'
in the Winter Term (Jan. to April)
may obtain additional information and/
or application blanks in Rm. 15, Bar-
bour Gym., Applications are due by
Wed., Nov. 24.
Student Tea at the home of Presi-
dent and Mrs. Harlan Hatcher on-
Wed., Nov. 17, from 4-6 p.m. All stu-
dents are cordially invited.
Joint Judiciary Council: Petitioning
is now open for five student members
of the Joint 'Judiciary Council and
two student mempers for the Univer-
sity Committee on Standards and Con-
dhct, Deadline date, Nov. 17, at 5
p.m.' Interviewing will be on Nov. 21
and 22 in the SGC Rm., Third Floor,
SAB. Petitions are available in Rm.
1011 SAB.
MIDYEAR GRADUATION EXERCISES
December 18, 1965
To be held at 2 p.m. Jn Hill Aud.
Exercises will conclude about 4 p.m,,
All graduates of the summer 'term of.
1965 and graduates as of December 1965
may attend.
Reception forsgraduates, their rela-
'-tives and" friends in Michigan League
Ballroom at 4 p.m. Please enter League
at west entrance.
Tiglkets: 'Four to, each prospective
graduate, to berdistributed from Mon.,
Dec. 6, to 1 pm., Sat., Dec. 18, Diploma
Department, 555 Administration Bldg.,
except :on Sat,, Dec. 11, when office.
will ' be closed. Sat., 'Dec. 18, office
will be open from 9 to 1 p.m.
'Academic Costume: May be rented at
Moe Sport Shop, 711 N. University
Ave. Orders should be placed imme-
diately.
Assembly for Graduates: At 1, p.m.
in Natural Science Aud. Marshals will
direct graduates to proper stations. '
Programs: To be distributed at Hill
Aud,
Candidates who qualify for' a doc-
toral degree from the Graduate School
and WHO ATTEND THE GRADUA-
TION EXERCISES will. be presented a
hood by the University. Hoods given
during the ceremony are all Doctor of
Philosophy hoods. Those receiving a
doctor's degree other than the PhD
may exchange he PhD hood ,for. the
appropriate one after the ceremony.
Such exchange may -be made in Room
1139 Natural Science Bldg. during .the
half hour' after the' recessional -march,
or in Room 2564 Administration, Bldg..
on the following Monday morning.
Placement
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS: Bureau
of Appointments-Seniors & grad stu-
dents, please call 764-7460 for appoint-
ments with the following:
MON., NOV. 15-
Unilever Ltd., London, England-Post-
I'

doctoral scientists from United King-
ddm interested in positions in R. & D.
Unilever research is a worldwide or-
ganization in which activities of in-
dividual labs reflect regional require-
ments. Labs in the UK, Holland, France,
Germany, U.S., & India. Men & women.
TUES., NOV. 16-
Northwestern Univ., Business School,
Chicago, IlL.-Men.,'Degrees in any field
for grad study leading to MBA or PhD
in business. I'
Lincoln National Insurance Co., Ft.
Wayne, Ind.-April Grads with degree
in Gen. 'Lib. Arts and Math for posi-
tions in Insurance (home office), Man-
agement Trng. & Sales (inside & ter-
ritorial).
Burroughs Wellcome & Co., Inc.,
Tuckahoe, N.Y.-Degree in any field
for, territorial sales with mfr. of fine
pharmaceutical products..
SNew York Central System Railroad,
Detroit-Men & women. BA & MA's in
Econ., Math, & Law, Positions in elec.
computing, Mgmt. Trng. territorial

, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Har-,
risburg-Various openings including
Govt. Career Trainee, Employment
Counselor Trainee, Indust. Hygienist,
Chemist, Dietitian, Caseworker, Child
Day Care Center Teacher, Rehab. Cous.
Trainee, etc. These are beginning level
positions for college grads. No exper.
needed.
Public Health Service, Billings, Mont.
i-Medical Technologist for positions in
Indian hospitals. BS in Med. Tech., or
BS Chem. for a biol. sci. plus trng. or
exper. in med. lab, work, or equiv.
comb. of study & exper. Exper. quali-
fies for higher rating.
City of Madison, Wis.-Public Health
Nurse. Degree in nursing & eligible
for regist. Knowl. of general public
health nursing program.
For further information, please calll
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.

SUNDAY, NOV.14
10 a.m.-The adult discussion
group of the Ann Arbor Friends
Meeting will discuss "Quaker
Views on Conscientious Objection"
in the meeting room at Friends
Center.
2:30 and 8 p.m.-The Profes-
sional Theatre Program will pre-
sent the APA in "Herakles" at
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
3 p.m.-Recovery Inc. will dis-
cuss a method of self help in
dealing with psychological sym-
ptoms at the Newman Center.
4:15-Ellis Dillon, Irish author,
will speak on "The Hows and
Whys of Writing for Children" in
the Rackham Amphitheatre.
7 and 9 p.m.-The Cinema Guild
will present "Experimental Film
program Number Two" in the
Architecture Aud.-
7:30 p.m.-Marston Bates will
speak on "Human Environment at
Betsy Barbour.
8:30 p.m.-Serge Fournier will
direct the University Symphony
Orchestra at Hill Aud.
MONDAY, NOV.. 15
11 a.m.-1 p.m.-SGC candidates
will express their viewpoints be-
fore the student body on the diag.
4-8 p.m.-Sorority Rush Regis-
tration for freshmen at Stockwell,
Lloyd and South Quad (Hunt
House) ' Lounges.
4:15 p.m.-Ellis Dillion, author
of children's books will speak on
"The Hows and Whys of Writing
for Children" at Rackham Am-
phitheater.'
6:45-8 p.m.-Rush Counselors
will answer questions in the
lounges of Stockwell, Lloyd and
South Quad Hunt House.
7:10 p.m.--Last Chance Lecture
by James H. Robertson, associate
dean, College of Literature, Science
and Arts, at the Michigan League.
8:30 p.m.-The University Musi-
cal Society Concert presents the
Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra,
Kiril Kondrashin conducting at
Hill Auditorium.
TUESDAY, NOV. 16
4-8 p.m.-Sorority Rush Regis-

s
f
C
s
r
;
r

sales & transport. Women with de- EDUCATION DIVISION:
grees in Math for data processing. Lo- The following Michigan schools will
cations include N.Y.C., Detroit, Syra- interview for prospective teachers for
cuse, Cleveland & Indianapolis. January 1966 placement:
WED., NOV. 17- MON., NOV. 15- ,
U.S. Public Health, Service, VD Branch, Detroit (Redford Union Schs.) -
Detroit-Degrees in Econ., Gen. Lib. Elem. Vocal Music, J.H.: Engl./SS,
Arts, Journ., Math, Public Health, Draft., H.S.: Metal Shop, Ind. Math/
Speech, etc. for Mgmt. Trng. Offices Shop.
in most major metro. areas. TUES., NOV. 16-
U.S. Air Force, Ann Arbor - Men Alpena-All Elem., J.H.: Lib., Sci-
women. BA & MA's in any field of ence, Speech Therapy, Special Ed.
study for -Officer Trng. School. World- Standish (Standish-Sterling Comm.
wide locations. Schs.)-Elem., Art, Sec. Math, Vocal
Atlantic Refining Co., Phila., Pa. - Music K-12.
MA's & PhD's in Econ. & Math. Po- WED., NOV. 17-
sitions in Bus. System Analysis & Op. Rudyard-Kdg., Elem., Elem. Guid.
Res. Located in Phila. & Dallas (p.m. East Lansing-Elem.: % time French,
only). H.S.: German, Soc. Stud., "Head Start"
Teacher.
POSITION OPENINGS: Trenton-Elem.: Type A, Speech Cor-
Federal Savings & Loan Association, rection, Visiting Teacher.
Adrian, Mich. - Auditor Accountant. Livonia-Elem. K-6, Engl., Ind, Arts,
Managerial & systems planning ability Dist. Ed., Library, Engl./SS, Math/Set.,
Some exper. pref., career opportunity, Math, Set., Visiting Teacher.
Anchor Ifocking Glass Corp., Lancas- THURSDAY, NOV. 18- ,
ter, Ohio-Chemist for R. & D. BS in C sio-Elem. 1st Grade, J.H.: Arts/
Chem. or Ch. Engrg. 2-3 yrs. indust. Cfts-Man, Home Ec., Girls PE, Boys
lab exper. IPE, Counsel/Lib.
Local Organization-Chemist for re- Warren-Elem.: Lib., Vocal Music,
search with pathology dept. BS ChemH Speech Corr., Deaf, Visiting Teacher,
No exper. required. J.H.: Rem. Reading, H.S.: Physics/Math,
- Dow Jones & Co., Inc., Detroit - Chem./Biol., EJI.
Sales Mgmt. Degree plus 2-3 yrs. sales Flint-Elem.: Rem. Reading, Home-
exper. Sell publications & learn re- I bound, Speech Corr., Math, J.H.: Gen.
cruiting, trng. & supv. in Mgmt. Dev St., Core (S,/Eng.), H..: Engl., Math,
Program., Auto Shop, Boys PE.
Michigan Society for Mental Health, FRI., NOV. 19-
Detroit-Director. Degree in Psych., GrandHaven-Elem. 2, 3, and 4. J.H.:
Health Educ., Public Admin., Soc. Work Math/Sci., H.S.: Biol./Health, Speech
or Educ, 5 yrs. admin. or supv. ex- (Continued on Page 6)
per' in health- & welfare agencies. Co- _ __-----
ordinate program for services and needs Ph 483-4680
of mentally ill children & adults.Ph4-4
Ayerst Labs., Inc., Rouses Point, N.Y.
-1. Mech. Prod. Engr. BS Ch. or Mech.-
Engrg. 2-5 yrs. exper. in/ mfg. and/or
pkg. 2. Chemist. BS Chem. Some An- 't _ 1 -
alyt. exper. 3. Ass't. Mgr. MS Chem.
pref. Knowl. of Physics, Biol., & Mi- En n CARPENTER ROAD
crobiol. 10 yrs. exper.___FREE CAR HEATERS

tration for freshmen at Stockwell,
Lloyd and South Quad (Hunt
House) lounges..
4:30 p.m.-Guillermo Espinosa
will speak on "Achievement of
International Relations Through
Music" in the Recital Hall, School
of Music.
8 p.m. - Elizabeth Converse,
managing editor of the Journal of
Conflict Resolution, will discuss
"Finding Out What We Think
We Know Already" at the First
Presbyterian Church.
8 p.m.--Jose Barchilon, M.D.,
University of Colorado will lecture
on "Some Unconscious Factors in
the Teacher-Learner Relationship"
in the Auditorium, Children's Psy-
chiatric Hospital.
8:30 p.m.-The University Musi-
Society Concert presents the Mos-
cow Philharmonic Orchestra, Ev-
geni Svetlanov conducting at Hill
Auditorium.
WEDNESDAY, NOV.17
8 a.m.-5 :30 p.m.-SGC election
polls will be open.'
10 a.m.-2 p.m.-Sorority Regis-
tration for freshmen at the Wom-
en's League, Kalamazoo Room.
12 a.m.-Toby Hendon, director
of The Children's Community Ann
Arbor, will discuss the book
"Teacher" by Sylvia Ashton-
Warner in Rm. 2 Michigan League.
8 p.m.-Department of Speech
University Players Performance of
Shakespeare's "Henry VN Part I"
will be given in Trueblood Aud.
8:30 p.m.-School of Music Fac-
ulty Concert, a String Trio at
Rackham Lecture Hall.
THURSDAY, NOV.18
10 a.m.-2.p.m.-Sorority Rush
Registration for freshmen at the
Women's League,' Kalamazoo Rm.
2:15 p.m.-EHerman Koenig, of
Michigan State University will
talk on the "Stimulation of the
University" in 1057 MHRI.
4:10 p.m. - Visiting Professor
Luigi Salerno of Pennsylvania
State 'University will discuss "Ro-
coco Art in Rome" in Aud B Angell
Hall.
DIAL 5-6290
Even Scotland Yard
Can't Find Her.

1pus Calendar
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
present Oliver Twist in the Archi-
tecture Aud. t
8 p.m. - The Department of
Speech University Playeers will
perform Shakespeare's Henry VI
Part I in Trueblood Aud.
8:30 p.m.-School of Music Fac-
ulty Concert will be "Early Italian'
Music in Honor of Dante's 700th
Birthday" in Rackham Lecture
Hall.
FRIDAY, NOV.19
4 p.m.-Hans Thirring, of Vien-
na University will speak on "The
Future of Space Industry" in 170
Physics-Astronomy.
7 and 9 p.m.--The Cinema Guild
will present Oliver Twist in the
Architecture Aud.
8 p.m. - The Department of
Speech University Players will per-
form Shakespeare's Henry VI Part
II in Trueblood Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The University Musi-'
cal Society Opera presents the
New York Opera Company in Car-
men at Hill Aud.
SATURDAY, NOV.20
7 and 9 p.m.-The Cinema Guild
presents Oliver Twist in the Archi-
tecture Aud.
8 p.m. - The.Department of
Speech University Players will per-
form Shakespeare's Henry VI Part
II in Trueblood Aud
8 p.m.-The School of Music
Bandorama presents the niver-
sity Bands, William D. evelli
conducting, at Hill Aud.

Read".
Daily
Classifieds

1
. A....
.,,..

won the Koussevitsky Memorial
Conducting Prize.
In Tanglewood, he met Leonard
Bernstein, the conductor of the
New York Philharmonic, who in-
vited him to come to New York
to audition for assistant conduc-
tor. Fournier accepted-and won
the job for the 1962-63 season.
He is presently conductor of the
Toledo Symphony.
Fitting Program
His program for this evening-
Mozart's Symphony No. 35
("Haffner"); the Suite No. 2 from
Roussel's opera, "Bacchus and
Arianne"; and Tschaikovsky's
Symphony No. 5-Fournier says
is well-suited both to his own
tastes ("of course, the Roussel is
a very French piece") and the
orchestra's talents (particularly
the Tschiakowsky number). (He
adds gravely that the Mozart is
"a good piece for discipline,")
From here Fournier will return
to the Toledo Symphony, which
has recently performed with
artists such as cellist Janos Stark-
er, ahd will also be making a
guest appearance with the Chicago
Symphony in February.
But informed sources in the
Music School are predicting that
the School may be interested in
asking Fournier back frequently
or, perhaps, permanently. To judge
from the reactions of the orches-
tra's members, even its "wooden
horses" heartily approve.
Welcome
Students!
, DISTINCTIVE
COLLEGIATE
HAIRSTYLNG
For MEN-
And Women-
* 7 Hairstylists
TH E DASCOLA BARBERS
Near'Michigan Theatre

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GUILD HOUSE.
802 Monroe
I Monday Noon Luncheon
November 15
"AFRICA: PROBLEMS
OF COLONIALISM"
SPEAKER: HARRISON MUYIA, Lecturer
President African Student Union in Michigan

11

DIAL 662-6264
PREMIERE ENGAGEMENT
Shows at 1:15-3:45-6:15 & 8:50
It Fiercely Lives Again
....the Lusty World
of the War Lord !''°

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/
0,
0

I

U-M
SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA

SERGE FOURNIER
Guest Conductor

Mozart-Symphony No. 35
(Haffner)
Roussel-Bacchus et Arianne
Suite No. 2
Tschailowsky-Symphony No. 5
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 14
8:30 P.M.

ENDS TONIGHT
JOSEPH E.UVIE ALL
Pres*s COLOR
A CY ENDFIELD-STANLEY BAKER PRODUCTION
lcI0cflL-rE MNAWSIOM 'A PMAUOIT Mu
ALSO
- soMUer
for PR9W
CLOSED MON. & TUES.
OPEN WED.

CHARLTON
HESTON
RICHARD
BOONS~

s
hn F . g' ya - l

Continuous
Today
From 1 P.M.

/

1. .,

1

M.. Yhol ,

"AN ABSOLUTE KNOCKOUT OFA M0VIEr
-Bosley Crowther. N.Y. Times --

ROMAN POLANSKI'S
"A tour-c
force of s
- and suspe
Flowless!
CATHERINE DENEUVE - L
Screenplay by ROMAN POLANSKand GERARD BRACH Mag
Produced by EUGENE GT)WSI

DIAL
8-64)16

I

'1l :1

ANO'bMOPREMINGEm FILM

HILL AUDITORIUM
ADMISSION FREE

ROSEMARY FORSYTH " GUY STOCKWEL
NIALIMacGNNIS Aso E
HENRY RCOXON STARRNG MAn E A

LAURENCE OLIVIER
CAROL LYNLEY
THE ZOMBIES
NOEL COWARD

de-
ex
ense!
gazine

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DEAN ROBERTSON,
Monday, Nov. 15:
-7:10 P.M.
League-Michigan Room
SA (-rE-1 JT3T A -16TF'fU~T

Tonight at 7 and 9 P.M.
Experimental Film Program No.2
Thanatopsis (Emshwiller) The Violinst (Pintoff)
The Interview (Pintoff) Ingreen (Dorsky)
Day of the Painter (Davis) Scorpio Rising (Anger)
ct fi. Radom fWAbhn. ma Wntsnl

The University of Michigan Gilbert and Sullivan Society

Presents

DiateCBE P,3,a e
DECEMBER 1, 2, 3, 4

I

III

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