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November 09, 1965 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-11-09

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY''

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1965

PAGE TWO TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 196~

Goodman Raps Education in

4

(Continued from Page 1) .
the small farmer, which are con-
sidered "inefficient."
-The fact that this country is
headed for ecological disaster with
our air pollution, water pollution
and the extensive use of insecti-
cides.
-The debasement of communi-
cations; as more messages are sent
less information is received. Good-
man believed that a great amount
of mass communication served
only the purpose of brainwash-
ing the public.
-Our involvement in the pow-
er struggle known as the Cold'

War. He said that countries such
as Denmark and Sweden had ceas-
ed to be great powers but had
in no way lost their positions in'
the intellectual history of man.
Goodman quoted Arthur Miller
who had said, "When the war
starts, culture dies."
Youth as a Class
Turning to the effect of this
society on our educational system,
Goodman charged that youth was
now being treated as a class, one
that had to be policed through
this period and trained in the
schools before it could do anything
for society. The object of this

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training was "national goals such experience in education courses,#
as beating Russia in the space who would be willing to teach
race. for a few years at lower salar-t
The fallacy of our educational ies, and who would be equally ast
system, according to Goodman, is competent as licensed teachers.I
that the educational Establish- Goodman claimed each school
ment is competent and that going could serve its own small dis-
to school is equivalent to getting trict and be administered by it at
an education (which, he added, is the same cost as the present New1
a relatively new concept). York school system, which has at
The result of this philosophy pupil-teacher ratio of one to 30'
and system of education, Goodman as opposed to the one to six inI
said, is to eliminate any signifi- the new system.t
cant number of alternatives for Variety of Alternatives r
the youth of this country, educa- He envisioned that the primary'
tionally and vocationally, and to goal of education would not be
create an enormous bureaucracy the standardization of today, but
that insures the standardization of rather the encouragement of and
the educational experience., provision for "as much variety of
Decentralize School System alternatives in education as possi-
Goodman then suggested an al- ble."
ternative to this type of educa- In his second address, given
tion, based on a decentralization Sunday evening in the UGLI Mul-
of the school system. He described tipurpose Room and sponsored by
a school in New York, which was Voice and UAC, Goodman offered
set up in a modest storefront -
building, with three teachers and1'
one specialist who came to teachI _ w

Great Socieety'
a short analysis of the student to the substance of democracy.
activists of the New Left. He then feels that formal democracy has
threw the rest of the evening open failed.
to a discussion of various issues Goodman saw a whole genera-
now concerning the student activ- tion as being "fed up" with so-'
ist. ciety and on the brink of corn-
plete rejection not only of its
Goodman considered the term standards, but also of its very
New Left a poor if not erroneous premise for existence. He said that
description of student radicalism. he had found this all over the
He characterized the new student i world where there was great sim-
radical as one who is left out of ilarity between youth in dress, in
the society or alienated from it. situations in life, and in attitudes
This student demands authenticity toward the society.
from the country's leaders who, The reasons for his analysis of
he maintains, are completely un- the new student generation as not
aware of reality. Finally the stu-
dent radical who wants a return SEE GOODMAN, Page 6

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In such a system, he suggested,4
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DIAL 8-6416
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