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November 05, 1965 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-11-05

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TIIE. MICIIIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, NOVE _E %-T; I"5'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, NOVEMBER'S. 1965

FROM PRESS FUND:
Fine Gets Award
For Latest Book
By RICHARD CHARIN significance of the act." He con-
cluded by saying that while NIRA
Prof. Sidney Fine of the history may not have been as important
department has been awarded as Roosevelt predicted, his re-
$1000 for adding "the greatest search indicates that it was more
distinction" to the press list of important than historians of the
the University of Michigan Press period usually believe:
with his book "The AutomobileDe
Under the Blue Eagle." This an- Ine U's Degrd
nual award was inaugurated this Fine was an undergraduate at
year with money made available Western Reserve University, and
ha rnitrd hic tacfr d d i

LOUIS LOMAX IS COMING
Writer-in-Residence Program
Committee Help Needed:
+ BOOKLET
* SCHEDULING
* PUBLICITY
SIGN UP NOW In UAC Office
Second Floor, Union

'I

ADDRESSING THE APA SYMPOSIUM last night were, (from left): Professors William R. McGraw,
John Styon.
S mposim is, Bcssest APAProd
Of -MaeLeash, ee ei, K u mai

By JOHN CRUMB, J .
The Association of Producing
Artist's current- billings,. Mac-
Leish's "H e r;a k 1 es," Beckett's
"Krapp's. Last Tape," Kaufman
and Hart's "You Can't Take It
with You"' and Ibsen's "Wild
Duck," were discutsed in a sym-
posium last night in the Michi-
gan Union Ballroom.
Prof... Claribel, Baird of the
speech department moderated, the
discussion between Prof. William
R. McGraw of the speech depart-
ment and visiting Prof. John Sty-e
on of the English, department,

originally of the University of
Hall at Hall, England.
"You Can't Take It with You"
was chosen as representative of
American "classic" theatre, Baird'
said. Kaufmann was awarded the
Pulitzer Prize for this play. It
was a peak in his career in that
it has , interesting characters
(characterization was his weak
point) as well as good farce.
Styon noted that it is very
sentimental. The play is half
comedy and half farce, and the
boy-girl scenes sag under the
heavy mush.
Yet Rabb, the APA's director,

I -

is working just for that nostal-
gia in "playing it straight" that
allows one to enjoy it, realizing
that we are "superior to it" and
it is a sign that American theatre
is still growing, McGraw said.
Further, he said, it cannot be
criticized as a form, i.e., farce,
but as a play centered around the
idea of unconventionalism. This
theme is not treated with the
cynicism of pure farce. "Man
must have his allusions," McGraw
said, and "tragedy is when man
is forced to look on himself ob-
jectively." Ibsen's "Wild Duck"
sees no absolute right or wrong,
and Ibsen probes man's mind as
an observer, not a moral judge.
Thus, McGraw said, Ibsen's con-
flict is the recognition, by a fam-
ily, of the "truth"-what they
really are. They are destroyed by
the loss of their illusion. What was
"right" for them was not truth,
but a comfortable compromise.
"Yet, like Willy Loman in Ar-
thur Miller's 'Death of a; Sales-
man'," Baird said, something was
gained by the destruction of illu-
sion, even though Willy killed
himself. Ibsen is subtle and he
leaves a question at the end of
"Wild Duck." His play is a dia-
lect and he lets the auyence draw
the moral conclusion.-
MacLeish and Beckett are well
billed together, Styon said, "but

by the Michigan Alumni Fund.
The award is open to any Uni-
- versity faculty or research staff
member, including those with
emeritus rank. Publications are
judged by the editorial committee
of the Press.
The presentation of Fine's award
was made by University President
Harlan Hatcher during a luncheon
in the University's Inglis House,
attended by the members of the
executive committee of the Press.
-Daily-Ron Berman Last Saturday in Detroit, Fine's
book also received the Merit
Ciaribel Bair (moderator), and Award of the American Associa-
tion for State and Local History.
Analyzees NIRA
Fine's book is the first to anal-
u etio iisyze the effects of the highly con-
ne tio is itroversial National Industrial Re-
covery Act (NIRA) on the auto-
mobile industry. President Frank-
n , lb senlin D. Roosevelt praised this act
, Ib sen asthe"most important and far
reaching legislation ever enacted
perhaps MacLeish could learn by the American Congress." It
from Beckett ... Herakles, doesn't was later declared unconstitution-
fit our times as a god-figure ... al by the Supreme Court.
he is all brawn and no brain. It's While discussing his book Fine
like asking Ajax to be the hero stated, "There has been a ten-
of the Trojan War." dency among students of New
"And the tourists are very em- Deal history to downgrade the in-
barrassing. They are on stage to fluence of NIRA. My book shows
fill in the Gretian background, that at least in one industry, the
yet they do not prepare the au- NIRA had tremendous signifi-
dience for Herakles or his wife. cance.""
It is a great strain on the leading He continued to say that stud-
actors to compensate for the tour- ies of other industries under NIRA
ists who do little more than stand are needed before any overall con-
around feeling restless. clusions can be reached about the
The audience more easily iden-
tifies with Krapp, Styon said.
Beckett forces the audience to
laugh at intensely serious sub-
jects and at the pathos of Krapp
without being revolted by him. DIXIELAND
Hie is no myth, no pretention and
is more close to the audience. by the fabulous
"Krapp" is, as such; a more ef-
fective dramatic statement.
Prof. McGraw got the oppo- JASS BAND
site impression. Although the tour-
ists are superfluous, the ,total'of
"Herakles" is concerned with man
being higher than the animals 211 N. MAIN
and somewhat noble. The device
of using a myth best conveys this
description of modern man. Ph. 483-4680
Rather, "Krapp's Last Tape" is
too obvious, heavyhanded and re-
petitious. "In contrast, 'Herakles'
is a more interesting world," Mc-
Graw said. Entce On CARPENTER ROAD

igan. He has been a faculty them-
ber here since 1948.
His "Laissez Faire and the Gen-
eral Welfare State: A Study of
Conflict in American Thought,
1865-1901" has been previously
published by the University Press.
Fine is currently working on a
two-volume biography of Frank
Murphy, former governor of Mich-
igan and an Associate Justice of
the Supreme Court.,

te rece ve nis masers an Moc-
torate at the University of Mich

LAUCHER's
THE 80111 TING
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CAMPUS
DIAL. 8-6416

5

--

L'AMO0IJR

AL OVE PEYA AMOR

LOVE IS INTERNATIONAL

LIERE LYOBOV
TICKETS: $3.50/rouple ,
International Cemer m. 18-now.
Fishbowl-Nov.'8, 9, 12
1st Floor Unior'i- Nov. 10, 11

AST

1965 GALA BALL
NOV. 12--8:30 P.M.
UNION BALLROOM
MAXIMILIAN BAND

I

I

NEW MAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION'
presents
EVIENING OF SONG
with
Sister Mary Lorena, S.S.J.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5 8:00 P.M. !~

i

APA To Perform Hart's
Cassic on Broadivay

331 Thompson

i

By JOYCE WINSLOW
"You Can't Take It With You,"
APA repertory production cur-
rently playing here under the
auspices of the University's PTP,
will go to Broadway later this fall.
TfuiTn a n iitr nn7

"Most of the costs of production
have already been underwritten
by the University while the APA
was here."
The APA had indicated earlier it
would disband after this fall's en-

FREE IN-CAR HEATERS
TONIGHTTHRU SUNDAY
COUM5M PICTURES
WYLEWS
the colletor,.-
TECHNICOLOW
PLUS--FUN HIT
**
LEM f 90HE E
- darda. IB ' IP"+ N
. - d --------- - -
BOX OFFICE OPENS 6:30
AFTER SUN. WE WILL
BE OPEN ON FRI.,
SAT. & SUN. ONLY

m

I~

"1

S~is
OLYMPIA'
:TIME

ment atheycum hee gagement here. The fact that it is
vember 23 staying together for a Broadway
run may mean it plans to renew
Earlier this year, the APA- sI
Phoenix cancelled their projected its contract. Negotiations are cur-
Broadway run at the Lyceum rently underway with the Univer-
scheduled for this winter. The sity's PTP for a return of the
reason given for the cancellation APA to campus next fall.
was the lack of a Ford Foundation , -

I

University Typewriter Center
Home of OLYMPIA, the Precision Typewriter
613 E. William St 665-3763

Grant which would have subsidiz-
ed the company in their move
from the small Phoenix Theatre
to the larger Lyceum. According
to Gary Schaub, administrative
assistant of the PTP, the pro-
jected move to the Lyceum would
have "expanded the company.
They would have presented six'
shows under the APA-Phoenix
banner."
"The cost for putting on 'You
Can't Take It With You' to be
shown at the Lyceum is consider-
ably low," Schaub said.

Psentst p U II
IN
and "KRAPP'S LAST TAPE"
i I I

9

ATTENTION: FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES
JUNIOR YEAR ABROAD
AT AIX-EN.PRqVENCE, FRANCE
There will be an informational meeting for all in-
terested students on Tuesday evening, Novenber
9th at 7:30 P.M. in the 3rd floor conference room
of the Michigan Union. Faculty members and stu-
dents who attended the program last year will be
present to answer your questions.

fi

Tl

a

WOMMMMEMMO"

STARTS
TODAY

DIAL
5-6290

I

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B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
1429 Hill Street,
SABBATH SERVICE

11

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11

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___________ ' sS~s
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