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November 05, 1965 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-11-05

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FRIDA.,'NOVEMBER 5, 2965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

FRIDA~Y, NOVEMBER 5,1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAflI! TUUV~

Le Grand Charles: Ally or

Adversary of U.S.?

Associated Press News Analysis
PARIS-President Charles de
# Gaulle now is a candidate to suc-
ceed himself in the Dec. 5 elec-
tions and there is no doubt in
anyone's mind he will be re-
elected.
Thus the United States faces a
fresh serving of the stubborn
single-mindedness of the French
President, whose fond aim is to
diminish American influence in
France and the rest of Europe.
For America and its allies per-
haps the biggest and most trouble-
some problem is de Gaulle's at-
titude toward the North Atlantic
Treaty Organization.
Integration
He has not yet spelled out how
he wants NATO changed, except
to condemn its integration of com-

mand. Integration, he says icily,
is subordination by another name.
And he says that if integration is
not ended by 1969 France will
have no part of NATO.
He apparently wants to sub-
stitute bilateral agreements on
defense for NATO, a return to the
established policy that prevailed
before World War I.
Exactly what he has in mind
about NATO probably will emerge
about mid-1966, according to well-
informed sources. His refusal to
say what he wants, until the mo-
ment he wants it, has made his
allies nervous.
No Secret
It is no secret that certain
contingency plans are being stud-
ied should France leave NATO
and make it necessary for its

headquarters to move elsewhere.
The biggest single problem in
U.S. and French relations, ac-
cording to highly placed French-
men, is NATO. Its commanding
general in Europe always has been
an American.
But there are other areas where
de Gaulle is seeking to diminish
U.S. responsibility and influence in
Europe.
Prime Target
For a time, American involve-
ment in Viet Nam was a prime
target for criticism. De Gaulle
wants a neutralized Southeast
Asia and lets no opportunity pass
by to say America can never
achieve a victory. This difference
has lessened with announced
American willingness to negotiate
a settlement.

De Gaulle wants negotiations
and a neutralized Southeast Asia
with Red China and the United
States each being the guarantor of
neutrality.
In Europe, de Gaulle first tried
to woo West Germany into the
French camp with a cooperation
treaty. This has all but died on
the vine because West Germany
declined to shelve close ties with
the United States.
Opposition
Added to that is de Gaulle's
opposition to giving West Ger-
many a say in nuclear strategy.
He has dismayed his partners
in the European Common Market
by sharply opposing any hint of
supranationalism, and to this end
has staged a boycott over the

pooling of agricultural funds. He
regards the Common Market as
thp economic version of his cher-
ished "Europe of Fatherlands,"
knit by agreements but not as a
supranational unit. He wants a
France free from anything which
might hamper independence in
economic and diplomatic action.
He has turned to the East,
recognizing Red China, and is
showing warmth toward the Soviet
Union. Foreign Minister Maurice
Couve de Murville's visit to Mos-
cow illustrated de Gaulle's desire
to extend French influence in the
affairs of Europe.
He has resisted the spread of
American investment in the
French economy, called for some
other international monetary unit
to replace the dollar and siphonede

off U.S. gold by
dollar reserves.

cashing in his

More Like An Adversary'
In cold fact, he has acted less
like an ally than an adversary.
Nonetheless, he feels that France
is traditionally a U.S. ally and
will continue to be.
Why, if he is an ally, does he
advance policies which appear
anything but friendly?
Part of the answer lies in his
own memoirs, "France Cannot be
France Without Glory." And to
have glory, as de Gaulle sees it,
she cannot depend on anyone else,
including U.S. paternalism fos-
tered by a protective and helpful
attitude after World War II.
He is determined to create a
France to be reckoned with, a
France which is Europe's leader.

De

Gaulle Says

He'll Run

PARIS (AP)-Eighteen days be-
fore his 75th birthday, Charles de
Gaulle announced last night he is
convinced he must continue to
serve France and therefore Will
run for a new seven-year term as
president Dec. 5. Few doubt the
people of France will give him a
vote of confidence.
In his brief address de Gaulle
said "I believe I must hold my-
self ready to carry on my task."
He clearly indicated he expects
to be approved by the electors,
saying:
"What a new impetus will be
given our republic when the one
who heads it will have been ap-
proved by you for his national
mandate!"

The president said his re-elec-
tion would assure the future of
the French Republic. He warned
that if he were defeated the na-
tion could "fall into a confusion
even more disastrous than she has
known before."
De Gaulle declared that much
progress has been made during
the past seven years while he has
been president, but much remains
to be done.
Ending months of supense as
to his political intentions, de
Gaulle made an eight-minute
speech carried throughout the na-
tion by radio and television. He
appealed for a massive endorse-
ment.
After he made the recording,
de Gaulle asked for a rerun so

tgain
that he could approve his per-
formance. The television crew
then was kept inside the palace
to make sure that no advance
word of his decision leaked out.
Apparently no one-with the
possible exception of Premier
Georges Pompidou-had been let
in on the secret. Pompidou was
received by de Gaulle for a lengthy
conversation yesterday afternoon.
Recalling briefly his wartime
services as chieftain of the Free
French movement, and his role in
preventing civil conflict in 1958,
the president stated:
"Today, I believe I should hold
myself ready to continue my task,
fully aware of the efforts required,
but convinced that at the present
time it is the best way to serve

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2.8 MILLION JOBLESS:
October Unemployment Rate
Falls to Eight Year Lowpoint

WASHINGTON (JP)-Unemploy-
ment dropped in October to 2.8
million persons, or 4.3 per cent
of the civilian labor force, the
lowest level in eight years, the
Labor Department said yesterday.
At the same time, the Bureau
of Labor Statistics said, civilian
employment was 73,196,000 for the
highest October level on record, al-
though slightly down from Sep-
tember.
Arthur M. Ross, newly appointed

commissioner of the bureau, said
the drop in the unemployment
rate from September's 4.4 per cent
was barely significant statistically,
but represented a continued strong
improvement since June when the
jobless rate was 4.7 per cent.
Roster of Unemployed
The roster of unemployed in-
cluded a million adult men, a
million adult women and 800,000
teen-agers.
October is normally the lowest

World News Roundup
By The Associated Press Rhodesian people be polled to find
WASHINGTON-House investi- out if they want independence on
gators told yesterday about a 1958 the basis of the existing consti-
convention of the Ku Klux Klan tution.
where a proposal to burn schools Prime Minister Ian Smith of
drove some members out of the Rhodesia says the people do. The
hooded order. constitution, however, severely re-
The purpose of the Atlanta stricts the suffrage of the 3.8 mil-
meeting, investigator Philip Man- lion blacks, now ruled by 225,000
uel told the House Committee on whites.
Un-American Activities, was to
consolidate the various Ku Klux
Klans. SAIGON, South Viet Nam-U.S.
But he suggested that a pro- cavalrymen's ambush of a column
posal "to burn schools in the of North Vietnamese regulars
event integration came to the near the Cambodian frontier add-
South" backfired. ed fresh material yesterday to
4 4 Saigon's old charge that neutral-
LONDON-The cabinet met yes- ist Cambodia is a haven for Com-
terday on the Rhodesian crisis and munist fighters.
the government prolonged the South Vietnamese authorities
present Parliament for two days over the last four years repeatedly
to face any possible weekend have declared the Communists
emergency over the issue. were using Cambodia for staging,
It could not be learned whether supply and rest centers. Prince
Prime Minister Harold Wilson Norodom Sihanouk, the Cambo-
had received a reply from Salis- dian chief of state, has vehemently
bury to his proposal that all the denied it.
Lecture Series, First Presbyterian Church
OPEN TO PUBLIC
"WHY STUDY WAR AND PEACE "
SUNDAY, NOV. 7,8:00 P.M.
"Peace Action and Peace Research"

month for unemployment.
Ross, in his first news confer-
ence as commissioner, said it is
important that the people of the
nation understand what the gov-
ernment's jobless statistics are in-
tended to show.
Unemployment has dropped
500,000 from a year ago, three-
fourths of it among adult men
and one-fourth among adult wom-
en but virtually none among teen-
agers.
Added Teen-Ageers
But, he pointed out, the nation
had absorbed 900,000 teen-agters
into jobs in the past year. The
rise in the number of teen-ageres,
stemming from the post-World
War II baby boom, was the big-
gest in the nation's history, he
said.
Ross noted that unemloyment
among nonwhites-mostly Negroes
-was still nearly double the white
rate at 7.9 per cent.
In Terms of People
He said he believes it important
to think of the jobless problem in
terms of people, rather than the
unemployment rate.
Noting that the 2.6 per cent
unemployment rate for adult men
appeared to be a low figure, Ross
added: "But it is a million people."
In reverse, he said the figures
showed 25 per cent unemployment
among Negro girls, indicating a
nearly hopeless situation. But this
figure only involves 74,000 persons,
he said.

H I R M

YOUR4

'WA/AON TO A STAR0.-f/

OUTA4~c~N

Communists To Face

READ
THE DAILY

$230,00
WASHINGTON (IP)-The gov-
ernment opened its case against
the Communist party yesterday
and said it will prove that volun-
teers were available to register the
party with the government as re-
quired by law.
The party is charged in 23
counts with failure to register as
an agent of the Soviet Union as
required by the 1950 Internal Se-
curity Act. It fixes a maximum
fine of $230,000 if convicted.
And lawyers for the party told
the jury, defense evidence will
prove that the failure of the party
to register was "neither willful
nor unlawful, and that the party
should be acquitted."

Penalty
Assistant U.S. Attorney Joseph
Lowther told the jury of four
men and eight women he will
prove that in November 1961
"there were available individuals
who, if they had been asked by
the party to register, would have
done so."
A 1962 conviction of the party
for failure to register was reversed
by an appeals court because the
government had failed to prove
the availability' of such a volun-
teer.
The ruling held party officials
could not be required to register
the party because of their privi-
lege against self incrimination.

To the readers and admirers of
Atlas Shrugged and
The Fountainhead
Nathaniel Branden's
recorded lectures on
Objectivism
the philosophy of
AYN
RAND
and its application to psychology
Begin Monday, Nov. 8, 8 P.M.
Ann Arbor Federal Savings &
Loan Assoc.
401 E. Liberty St., Ann Arbor
Admission opening night-$2.25
Student admission-$1.75
Nathaniel Branden Institute, Inc.
For descriptive brochure, contact
NBI's Local Representative
Mr. Irving J. Ralph
2635 W. Delhi Road
Ann Arbor, Mich. 48103
Ph.: 663-3205 (eves. & wknds.)

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Author of "Growing Up Absurd"
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INTERNATIONAL IMAGE:

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"FINDING OUT WHAT WE THINK
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