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November 03, 1965 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-11-03

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1965

PAGE TWO TIlE MIChIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, NOVE~ER 3, 1965

HILL AUDITORIUM:
Poznan Choir Gives Concert
Of Classical, Religious Songs

FINAL COOK LECTURE:
Dunbar Labels Racial Issue
'America's Primary Problem'

LYOBOV

L'AMIOUR

AI

PYAII

mLOVE

LIEBE

By FRITZ MILLER
The sound of music heard at
Hill Aud. last night echoed both
the 500 years of the existence of
the Poznan Choir and the fact
that they truly are one of the
finest male choruses in Europe.
The choir consists of approxi-
mately one third adults and two
thirds children from the ages of
seven to 15. "The Angels Sang
Sweetly" is both the name of one
of their songs and an apt descrip-
tion of the concert. The beautiful
soprano voices of the children
were the feature point of the
choir, and rightly so.
The Poznan Choir, similar to
the Czechoslovakian Orchestra
which appeared last Friday, does
not have a plush, overpowering
sound, and for this reason the first
half of the concert, which was'
devoted more to religious and clas-
sical songs, went unappreciated by
many (including me) in the aud-
ience. Their unpretentiousness,
however, is not a detriment if all
other factors are considered.
One factor of importance is the

technical perfection of this chorus.
Clearly each member is a highly
trained, controlled vocalist, and
one tended to forget that perhaps
half of the choir was under 13
years old. Each attack, each clos-
ing, whether stacatto or gliding,
was exact. The choir sang over a
wide dynamic spectrum, from the
light, airy, church-like songs that
predominated the first half of the
concert to the intensity of the
"Hallelujah" chorus which ended
the first half.

"Desire" were especially beauti-
ful.

By MARSHALL LASSER

It was a difficult concert to The race problem and Ameri-
appreciate and yet many did. One can liberalism were the subjects
of the encores was Randall yesterday of Leslie W. Dunbar's
Thompson's "Alleluia," which was fifth and final lecture of the 1965
excellent, and I only wish they William W. Cook lecture series.
had sung more of the same caliber Dr. Dunbar, executive director
music. of the Field Foundation, beganj
NEW JERSEY, DETROIT:

"70 'A. -W&~Ln.n A,% f

presents
IN h
and "KRAPP'
Read a
Michigan Dai

From the predominately black 1 ugne u a
and white program material the'
choir in the second half gave ai
more colorful presentation (both Election
visually and vocally). Dressed in -
red vests, they sang contemporary
music, some of which were Polish (Continued from Page 1)
folk songs, and even a Polish wed- Wayne Dumont for not advocat-'
ding song ("Sieradoz Wedding")
was included. ing the dismissal of a Rutgers
University professor who said pub-
The merry and festive sounds licly that "I welcome a Viet Cong
of such songs as the "Knight's victory."
Song" and "Play on Musician" Both Hughes and the Rutgers
added the missing element-vari- Board of Governors had said that
ety-to complete the concert. Two although they deplored the view
soprano solos in "Aria and Choir" expressed by the professor-Eu-
from "Kronungamesse" and in gene Genovese, an avowed Marx-
_ -ist and socialist--they defended
his right to say it is part of aca-
demic freedom.
Academic License
Dumont, however, claimed that
Genovese's statements which were
made before a Rutgers teach-in
last spring, were academic li-
cense and not academic freedom.
ke Hughes said during the elec-
tion that he had "gambled every-
thing" in the belief that the vot-
S LAST TAPE" ers would "trust their country, its
laws and its Constitution and not
be swayed by gross and crass ap-
peals to emotionalism, fear and
hysteria brought to the surface
by the extreme elements of the
nd UIse radical right."
nd U seHughes,56,scored an upset vic-
tory in 1961 over the late James
J y Class if ileds P. Mitchell, former President Ei-
senhower's labor secretary, to win
his first four year term. He was

vanagh Gain
ay Victories
the first Roman Catholic ever to
be elected governor.
Dumont, 51, a lawyer from a
rural county, has served in the
New Jersey legislature for the past
14 years.
Meanwhile, Detroit voters over-
whelmingly returned incumbent
Mayor Jerome P. Cavanagh to a
second four-year term yesterday.
With 41 per cent of the vote
counted, Cavanagh led his oppon-
ent, Detroit businessman Walter
C. Shamie, by a better than 2 to 1
margin. Over 400,000 voters turn-
ed out to elect a mayor, an entire
nine-man city council, and several
other city offices.
In the hotly contested council
race, all but two of the nine in-
cumbents were re-elected. In-
cumbents Anthony J. Wierbizki
and Thomas L. Poindexter were
defeated. Taking their place on
the council are the Rev. Nicholas
Hood and former mayor and coun-
cilman Louis C. Miriani. Ed Carey
led the council field for re-elec-
tion a& council president. Under
the Detroit city charter, the can-
didate placing first for council
becomes council president and is
first in succession to the mayor.
In a very close contest, Detroit-
ers, have apparently approved
fluoridation of their water sup-
ply. The proposal on the ballot
was worded so that in order to
vote for fluoridation, the voter had
to vote no on the referendum.
In other contests, Mills E. God-
win Jr. won election as the 21st
consecutive Democratic governor
of Virginia over the dual challenge
of Republicans and third-party
conservatives.

with a review of the topics of thei
series. One of the major subjects
was the civil rights issue, whichE
Dunbar called "America's primary1
problem," as it affected American1
public life: it has no solution, he4
said, "except to work at it."
The impact of the issue on poll-
tical liberalism was also a princi-
pal subject.
Outlining the effects, Dunbar
claimed that the civil rights strug-
gle led to the attack on poverty,
a greater concern for the quality
and extent of education and the9
reapportionment battles. The1
third major topic was liberalism
itself, which Dunbar described as
"government by discussion."
Dunbar then considered the
main topic of the lecture, the sit-
uation of the Negro. He noted as a
landmark both in government pol-
icy and presidential speeches the
June, 1965, Howard University
address of President Johnson.
Ominous Note
Dunbar cited Johnson's omin-
ous note that "the isolation of the
Negro from the white community
is increasing rather than decreas-
ing." He stressed the President's
statement that "opportunity is not
enough," that equality means "a
distribution of success and fail-
ure within ones group is compar-
able to the successes and failures
within other groups."
Again addressing himself to the
Johnson address, he pointed out
the dangerous breakdown in Ne-
gro family structure, saying- that
here was found the most urgent
Negro need - "family-sustaining
jobs for men."
Dunbar claimed that while many
minorities in American history
have been able to obtain their
rights through their own efforts,
the Negroes cannot do it alone.
He suggested six policies and goals
as necessary to help the Negroes.
Personal Security
First, "security of the person
must be guaranteed." Dunbar not-
ed that there have been 87 racial
killings in the South since 1955,
most of them in the last few years.
On the other hand, he said, the
recent civil rights struggle is rel-
atively bloodless compared to race
riots of past years; there have
been no blood-thirsty white mobs
in recent times.
Erasing remaining racial bar-
riers is the second task. Here,
Dunbar listed laws against misce-
genation, and employer and union
discrimination; he mentioned,
'though, the "amazing outcrop-
ping" of citizen-led discrimina-
tion-easing bodies as a favorable
development.
The third goal is that "Negroes
LAST 2 DAYS
"The lpcress File"
- FRIDAY 'a

must enter into free and full par-
ticipation in politics at all lev-
els." But, he pointed out, this must-
mainly be due to the efforts of
Negroes themselves. A big question
appears in this area: can Ne-
groes develop the same high qual-
ities of leadership as they pro-
duced for the civil rights move-
ment? he asked.
The fourth goal must be the
"injection of Negroes into all the
channels of professional and eco-
nomic advance." This is necessary
if the Negroes' feelings of frus-
tration and hopelessness are to
be eliminated.
The fifth category of develop-
ment is the strengthening of in-
dividuals, which can be aided
through education and elimination
of slum housing.
The sixth but not the least im-
portant policy, Dunbar said,
should be "the strengthening of
Negro community life." This can
be accomplished through the
building of cultural facilities, com-
munity centers, welfare institu-
tions, all of which Negroes lack
today, mainly because of money
shortage.
Concluding, Dunbar provided
sample questions on the utility
of current practices aimed at al-
leviating Negro problems. Tying
together the discussions on lib-
eralism and the Negro situation,
he presented as our best hope
"public policies grounded in prag-
matism."
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C. ERIC LINCOLN,

discusses his own book:

"THE BLACK MUSLIMS IN AMERICA"
12:00 Noon Book Discussion-
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NOV. 11: Nathan A. Scott, Jr., prof. of theology and literature, U of Chicago

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