100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 26, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 26. 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

TUESDAY. OCTOBER 26. 1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAC.~ Th1RV1~!

i rx4.XIJ A 11 AV 1: C1

zo

Johnson

Says

U.S.

Still

tWilling To Halt Bombings

Break Siege

4

Of. Outpost
.By' Viet Cong
Vietnamese Force,
Air Strikes Support
Pl e Me Resistance
PLEIKU (P) - Meeting only
scant resistance, a South Vietna-
mese regiment broke through a
r Plei Me outpost yesterday to sup-
port 300 Montagnard tribesmen
and a dozen United States advisers
holding out for seven days against
a Viet Cong assault.
The enemy offensive, apparent-
ly designed to clear supply lines
from Laos and North Viet Nam,
appeared to have collapsed. A U.S.
military informant in Pleiku said
the Plei Me defenders and Amer-
ican and South Vietnamese air
attacks had knocked out about
750 of the 1000 to 1200-man Viet
Cong force.f
The informant said reports from
Plei Me, about 25 miles south of
Pleiku, indicated .a regiment of
North Vietnamese regularswas
thrown into the fight.
Imperils Supply Lines
Plei Me, 210 miles northeast of
Saigon, apparently was a cher-
ished prize for the Viet Cong. Since
U.S. advisers and the Montagnards
set up the special forces camp
there, supply lines running from
North Viet Nam across the 17th
Parallel and through Laos and
Cambodia had been imperiled.
Capturing the camp would have
helped the Viet Cong keep the
supply routes open to highlands
areas now heavily infiltrated by
U.S. troops.
The South Vietnamese relief
force dug in outside the camp-a
triangle 150 yards long on each
leg-because of a lack of space
inside.
It was expected the relief force
would launch a search and clear
operation.
Wait for Ambushes
The Viet Cong apparently were
still in positions on a 150-foot-
high hill overlooking the camp and
U.S. military strategists in Pleiku
said it was possible the guerrillas
would wait now to strike at the
relief force in ambushes when it
pulls out after the clearingoper-
ations.
The armor-led column of South
Vietnamese troops struck out
from Pleku for Plei Me on Sat-
urday and ran into a heavy Viet
Cong ambush along the road. The
Vietnamese relief force, however,
had expected the attack and out-
flanked it.
With heavy air support, the re-
y lief force broke up the 600-man
ambush force, inflicting about 250
casualties.
Give Up Offensive
U.S. military officials said the
Viet Cong guerrillas apparently
had spent their power in the
thwarted ambush and were forced
to let up their offensive against
Plei Me outpost.
The camps' defenders sent out
combat patrols against the Viet
Cong just before the relief force
reached the outpost. One U.S. of-
ficer said his patrol counted 100
Viet Cong dead, some chained to
their automatic weapons.
The Viet Cong launched the at-
tack last Tuesday, hammering the
camp with mortars and machine
guns. The Viet Cong then attack-
ed the camp in waves but were
turned back by blistering return
4 fire. Viet Cong bodies hung on
barbed wire strung along the per-
imeter.
The enemy attack withered in
day after day of air attacks by
U.S. and South Vietnamese planes.

-Associated Press
UNICEF WINS PRIZE

Henry Labouisse, above, executive director of the United Nations
International Children's Emergency Fund ,(UNICEF) yesterday
accepted the Nobel Peace Prize for the organization. The prize
consists of a gold medal and a cash award of $51,788.
WILSON TRIP.-
Showdown Expected
In lhodes ian Visit

SALISBURY -P) - Britain's
Prime Minister Harold Wilson ar-
rived in Salisbury yesterday for
a showdown with Prime Minister
Ian Smith and said he had come3
from London "to avert a tragedy."
While 6000 Africans cheereda
him, the British leader made it
clear that he wanted at all costs1
to head off a grab for independ-
ence by Smith's white Rhodesian
government. ;
Wilson refused to say what
countermeasures the British gov-
ernment would take if the Rho-
desian government took the plunge
for independence.1
Wilson's government haswarn-1
ed it would consider any unilat-1
eral declaration of independence1
tantamount to treason and re-1
bellion by Smith's government,1
which rules over 3.8 million blacks1
and 220,000 whites.
Although it has its own govern-+
ment, Rhodesia is still a British
colony.
Britain has promised Rhodesia
independence but not under the
present system of Rhodesian gov-
ernment, in which the black ma-

jority has no say.
Smith was not at the airport
to receive Wilson, but Rhodesian
officials said protocol did not de-
mand Smith's presense. Deputy
Prime Minister Clifford Walter
Dupont was the chief Rhodesian
official in the airport receiving
line.
Wilson said he wanted to ac-
quaint himself with the feelings
and views in the country and,
secondly, to avert what in his
opinion would be a tragedy if
certain courses were pursued.
Wilson emphasized he wanted
to see anyone who had a contri-
bution to make to the solution of
the independence problem and
that specifically he wanted to see
the two. top African nationalist
leaders, Joshua Nkomo and Nda-
baningi Sithole.
Wilson's government already has
drawn up a plan of action if
Smith's government does declare
independence. The plan is said to
include stiff economic and finan-
cial sanctions and action before
the UN Security Council-but no
military force.

No Indication
That Peace t
Would Result
Fulbright Suggestion
Brings President's
Reiteration of Policy
JOHNSON CITY ()-President
Johnson, mingling light work with
convalescence in the sun, restat-
ed indirectly yesterday a willing-
ness to interrupt bombing of
North Viet Nam again if this1
might lead to the peace table.
The chairman of the Senate1
Foreign Relations Committee, Sen.
J. W. Fulbright (D-Ark), renewed
Sunday a suggestion for another,
longer interruption of air attacks
on North Vietnamese targets to
see whether this could help bring
about peace negotiations.
Asked for the administration's
reaction yesterday, White House
press secretary Bill D. Moyers
told newsmen:
Halt If Productive
"Our position has been known
on that for some time. We ac-
tually did call a halt once, for, I
believe, a period of five days. We
have indicated that we would be
willing to do it again if there
were any indications from anyone
else that to do so would be pro-
ductive.
"But we have had no indica-
tions that another cessation of
military strikes at military tar-
gets in the North would change
anyone's mind anywhere else."
The President conferred with
Secretary of State Dean Rusk on
the direct line to Washington yes-
terday. But Moyers gave no in-
dication that Fulbright's proposal
to suspend bombings for a more
"reasonable length of time" came
up.
Discuss Dominican Situation
Johnson and Rusk, he said,
went over developments in the
troubled Dominican Republic and
also discussed Rusk's trip to Rio
de Janeiro for a session of West-
ern Hemisphere foreign ministers
Nov. 17.
Regarding the Fulbright pro-
posal for another halt in bomb-
ings, Moyers told a questioner that
so far as he knew the senator
hadn't consulted the White House
about it in advance. The senator
spoke Sunday on NBC's television-
radio program "Meet the Press."
Fulbright upheld his right to
criticize the handling of foreign
policy, such as United States in-
tervention in the Dominican Re-
public, and complained that things
had reached the point that "if
you speak out, people jump down
your throat."
No Censure
The White House, Moyers said,
certainly hasn't and wouldn't cri-
ticize anyone for exercising the
right of free speech. But he said
anyone in public life who takes a
public stand on something is going
to be criticized himself," and Ful-
bright has been in public life
long enough to know that.
Later on, Moyers' attention was
called to Fulbright's contention
that the Defense Department has
great influence on foreign poli-
cy, even though the President
clearly is running it.
Moyers answered indirectly a
question whether Johnson feels
the Pentagon is exerting an inor-
dinate influence in this area. He
said: "I think the President feels
that the President sets foreign
policy in this country. I know the
President is not a militarist. I
know the secretary of defense is
not as much of a militarist as
some critics say he is. I know the
secretary of state is not a mili-

tarist. I'm not a militarist."

Bid To
Hit Court
Defeated
State Legislatures
Reject Convention To
Upset Apportionment
WASHINGTON (i)-A drive to
call an unprecedented constitu-
tional convention to reverse the
Supreme Court's one-man, one-
vote ruling apparently has failed,
leaving the issue of state legisla-
tive districting in the hands of
Congress.
Legislatures of 18 states-one
more than necessary-have eith-
er rejected or refused to pass the
proposal to call a constitutional
convention to override the Su-
preme Court's decision that both
houses of state legislatures be ap-
portioned according to population.
Under the Constitution, such a
convention can be called on pe-
tition of two-thirds of the states.
None ever has been summoned in
the 178 years since the Constitu-
tion was written.
Dirksen Amendment
The Dirksen amendment, which
would revise the Constitution to
permit states to apportion one
house of a legislature along non-
popular lines, still is alive. It is
due to come before the Senate
again in January, in a revised
form.
A study by the Library of Con-
gress' legislative referenceaserv-
ice shows that 19 states already
have reapportioned their legisla-
tures to bring both houses in
compliance with the court ruling
by next fall.
Revision Underway
In another 12 states, seemingly
satisfactory reapportionment plans
have been approved but await fin-
al court review.
Of the iemainiiig 19 states, pre-
liminary steps have been taken in
14. Court challenges are pending
in Louisiana, Mississippi, North
Carolina and South Carolina.
Presumably, legislatures already
reapportioned on the one-man,
one-vote basis would be less likely
to approve the Dirksen amend-
ment--if it should pass Congress
-than would legislatures in which
rural minorities are dominant.
Three-fourths of the states must
ratify a constitutional amendment
to make it effective.
Dirksen's latest attempt to push
his amendment through the Sen-
ate fell seven votes short of the
necessary two-thirds majority last
August.
But a revised version was forc-
ed out of the Senate Judiciary
Committee by Dirksen's threat last
month to block a top-priority ad-

SANTO DOMINGO (P) - About
2000 inter-American peace force
troops, backed by U.S. tanks, mov-
ed into the rebel area of this cap-
ital yesterday on a peace-forging
mission.
Bands of youths ran through the
streets shouting slogans against
the United States and Brazil,
whose soldiers make up most of
the force. Once when a crowd
gathered, Brazilian troops put on
gas masks as if ready to hurl tear
gas. The crowd dispersed.
The operation was ordered. by,
Provisional President Hector Gar-
cia-Godoy and whipped up the
anger of rebel partisans in the
heart of the city. Three shots
rang out during the early part of
the predawn move but there was
no official word as to what the
shooting was about.
The troops were called in to put
an end to a wave of violence that
has claimed more than nine civil-
ian lives in the city in the past
week.iThe deaths, resulting from
shooting incidents, demonstrated
that a considerable number of

Speaker:
For reservations,
call 662-5529

SWAMI PARAMPANTHI, of India
Sponsored by the
Ecumenical Campus Center

f 1

HALLOWEEN

SANTO DOMINGO:
Peace Force Quells Fighting

IS COMING TO

weapons remain in the hands of
civilians.
Almost all business activity end-
ed in the center of the city. Most
government offices were closed.
There was no way of determin-
ing, however, whether this was a
result of confused conditions or
of a nationwide general strike
call issued last week by far left-
ist factions. They ordered the.
strike to force the early depar-
ture of foreign troops and the dis-
missal of Dominican armed forces
leaders.

THE CANTERBURY HOUSE

IN ADDITION-

SO IS BLIND SULLEN GRUNT
RETURNING THIS WEEKEND ARE-
Ed and Pat Reynolds
Gory Mellen
John Miller
The Bobbsey Twins
Tarzan
Et alter
BRING SOMETHING FOR HALLOWEEN
a witch, a pumpkin, your datet
WILD FOLK MUSIC-FREFOOD

The troops, supported by tanks
and recoilless rifles, started mov-
ing into the city shortly after 4
a.m. Within 30 minutes they had
taken over an area that rebel
leaders once pledged would never
be touched by foreign troops.
Fatal shooting Oct. 16 of Angel
Severo Cabral, a conservative po-
litical leader, appeared to have
touched off an armed fight be-
tween rival leftist and rightist fac-
tions who have pledged "an eye
for an eye" war.

LUNCH-DISCUSSION
TUESDAY, October 26, 12:00 Noon
U.M. International Center
SUBJECT:
"MEANING AND MYSTERY OF REINCARNATION"

Open Fri. and Sat. 8:30-til

1.00 per person

ministration billi

to overhaul immi-

gration laws. ...

world News Roundup

LI
If

f
r

.r
a
I [
ik

l V' "- _ I yYr '4 "
w1 J ! a- ,. .s..

Jf w

iK

K - q i - -if~o- aoo- -f

OPOl

it

k

a' r J ~ J

f11

By The Associated Press
TORONTO - Trade Minister
Mitchell Sharp announced last
night Canada has signed a con-
tract to deliver $400 million worth
of wheat to Red China. It was
described as one of the biggest
wheat sales in history.
* * *
WASHINGTON - The Supreme
Court upheld yesterday aspects of
a Virginia reapportionment plan
attacked by Negroes as calculated
to cancel their rising political
strength.
The court's 8-0 ruling said:
"The concept of 'one-person,
one-vote' as we understand, neith-
er connotes nor envisages repre-
sentation according to color. Cer-

tainly it does not demand an
alignment of districts to assure
success at the polls of any race.
WASHINGTON -The Justice
Department stepped into litiga-
tion yesterday to end alleged ex-
clusion of Negroes from juries in
Lowndes County, Ala
* * *
MOSCOW - The Soviet Union
rose to the defense of the huge
Indonesian Communist party yes-
terday for the first time since the
attempted coup against President
Sukarno Oct. 1. The Russians said
there could ben o justification for
the reprisals against Indonesian
Communists growing out of the
coup attempt.

3
M
f

I!I

If%
;;
ii I
"4
j

r.

4

!Itl

nw.

Ai
n .

POOR BOY
SWEA TERS

$10

and $12

I

f

m

LONG OR SHORT SLEEVES.
GOOD COLOR SELECTION ...
SIZES 34 to 40.

I

I

I
,

Campus Financial Wizards...
do all their banking'at Ann Arbor Bank. They appreciate the economy
and convenience of Ann Arbor Bank's Specialcheck checking accounts
... you pay just 10c for each check you write . . . there's no service
charges either! Campus financial wizards also appreciate the fact that
Ann Arbor Bank has 3 campus offices . . . and soon to be four .. .
to serve their complete banking needs. If you're not a.CFW (Campus
Financial Wizard) see Ann Arbor Bank soon.

p

-= ---".
..,
, \
1 ,
~____
,.r"sM
:
1.
h\

F I

i

9.1
1.
i

.
'

\
,,
1.
J
"
3

I"

i

V J oil-

lid
1-1 1
Til
u I I -

11

I

.t U

e4I1a9

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan