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October 26, 1965 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-26

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, OCT613EIFt

TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY. OCTOBER 28. 1985

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V

FOR SPEAKER BAN:
Carolina May Face
Accreditation Loss

Collegiate Press Service
The University of North Caro-
lina is facing academic censure
and possible loss of accreditation
because of the state's so-called
anti-Communist speaker ban law.
The statute, which applies only
to state-supported colleges and
universities in the state, was un-
expectedly enacted by the legis-
lature in June, 1963. It makes
university and college administra-
tors and trustees "criminally
liable" if their facilities are used
by a known member of the Com-
munist party, someone advocating
the overthrow of the United States:
and/or North Carolina constitu-
tions, or someone who has pleaded
the Fifth Amendment in refusing
to answer questions with respect
to Communist or subversive ac-
tivities before authorized commit-
tees, tribunals or boards.
Support for the bill is now com-
ing from the John Birch Society,
the Ku Klux Klan and a con-
servative element of the American
Legion which U-NC has officially
characterized as being made up of
"racist politicians' and exploiters
of war veteran status."
The American Association of!
University Professors, w h i c h
strongly opposes such laws, says
that North Carolina's is unique in
the United States. Nine other
states, however, are studying the
adoption of similar measures.
Accreditation
The Southern Association of
Schools and Colleges, which has

threatened to withdraw the ac-
creditation of the university, will.
meet in Richmond, Va., for three
days beginning Nov. 28 to con-
sider the case. The association is
a voluntary group of 400 colleges
and universities in 11 southern
states.''
tU-NC President William Friday,
upset about the possible loss of
accreditation, said there would al-
most certainly be a faculty !xodus,
and the status -of millions of dol-
lars in federal funds and other
grants might be put in question.
'Communism is not the issue,"
the university insists. "The issue
is free speech. Students have the
right to hear and to listen to all
shades of opinion."
This summer, after two years
under the legislation, the univer-
sty broke its silence after the
legislature adjourned without con-
sidering a hoped-for revision in
the rule. The university is now
waging an all-out campaign
against the measure.
Seek Amendment
Gov. Dan K. Moore is coin-
mitted to at least amend the ban.
His opponent in the run-off pri-
mary last year, I. Beverly Lake,
said during his campaign that "if
repeal of the speakers oan is
necessary to , keep accreditation,
'then let accreditation go." Ob-
servers feel -this view is widely
shared among the vocal conser-
vative element in North Carolina.
The governor has appointed a
nine-member commission to hold
hearings on the ban.

CELEBRATED PIANIST RUDOLF SERKIN, pictured above, will c
ciety's Extra Series with a recital Mar.1
MusiclSocietly Serif
Sze ii, Cleveland Orchl

KOREAN TROUPE:
Dancers Fail Expectations
By GAIL BLUMBERG ilarny, "The Dance o the Sor- er more coommercial than artistic.
Magazine Editor ceress done by the chief dance It was this attitude that promp.Ed
instructress of the comipaii, Miss the name "The Little Angels" and
"The Little Angels," the last Soon Shim Shin, was ^ %telome that was responsible for such de-
performers in the Chamber Dance relief. She danced with the ex - scriptive phrases in the program
series on Sunday afternoon, gave pression and individuaIit; that notes as the dancers being
a program of Korean folk dance only a mature dancer can possess "charmingly fierce."
that was entertaining, but fell and in one number did more to A narrator, who could have been
short of my expectations. convey the spirit of Ko ea!i dance highly valuable in explaining this
The company of 26 Korean girls, than the whole prograen combined. foreign art form, was instead an
ages seven to fourteen, showed Perhaps the charm of these M.C. who told jokes, repeated the
surprising poise and grace in their little dancers became a bit cloy;::g program notes and dance titles,
etradition of Korea. They were ace because of the attitude of tfle plugged the fully illustrated sou-
trdiin of K aTe wrenac-Korean Cultural and Freedom venir program, and had th, little
companied by native instruments Foundation which ,:ponsored this girls talk cute English phrases to
.such as the hour-glass drum and,
plucked and bowed zithers.mn group. Theirs is an approacn rath- the audience.
The dancers showed special
skill in "The Penitent Monk"
which made use of dance move-j nuIN
ment synchronized with percus- LOUIS LOMAXIS
sive sound. Four dancers worked
against the intricate rhythm ofP
drums, which they played as they
danced. Each dancer played seven T T
drums and the overall effect was
fast-moving and dazzling. It was
a constant amazement to me that Petitions available Monday, Oct. 25 through Friday, Oct.
lose the University Musical So- such small children were so well 29 at front de.sk of UAC main office, 2nd floor Union.
os. ttrained and possessed such pre- People needed for Scheduling, Treasury, Publicity, Book-
cision and control in their work.
Because of its colorful costumes let, Special Events.
p en sand quick pace, "The Farmn I-
! Dance," reflecting the holiday;
spirit of the harvest season, was"
particularly successful. In the first
section of this dance, sticks of DIAL
Y wood were used for rhythmic ac- 5-6290
companiment. The third section
was, perhaps, a high point of thema
Bohemian pianist Rudolf Serkin. afternoon. Four of the older girls TuF
He is known for his extensive danced while wearing hats with a
world tours and his efforts which long streamer attached to the top. T INKING MAN'S i r
made the Marlboro Summer Fes- By a proper, and rather slight Tr M UULU I
tival one of the finest,. movement of the head, the . -NEWSWEEK
The New York Herald Tribune streamer was whipped in circles
has called Mr. Serkin "the greatest above the head and around the "A TAUT
living pianist, equalled by no other top of the body. In the last sec-
pianist and no other interpretive tion, the one male member of this TINGLING
musician." His performance will company did a similar dance, with F yr
indeed be a distinctive close to a much longer streamer, l'roduc-
the exciting season offered by this ing even greater amazement and
year's Extra Series, amusement.DY T
For the most part the restUof
the program, while well done, H TECHNICOLOR'
tended to be either too cute or a / TECNISCOP
or a little tiresome. Somehow ITECN.w..O...
longed for something of greater * HCEHI
l u tet substance. WM MICHAEL CAINE
This desire was partially fulfill-
ed by a demonstration of the
classical Court Musiz or Aak of
Korea. Each instrument was play- DIAL662-6264
ed in solo and in ensemble. Sim- ENDING TODAY
graduated from the Curtis Insti- -A"THE HILL'
tute and played solo clarinet with SEAN CONNERY
the Marine Band, and Nelson FREE to the first 20 Ladies at each
Holenstein, who attended the Theatre, one 8-pack PEPSI-COLA! 0 STARTS WEDNESDAY 6
Eastman School of Music. i Crr AT Wrlr'WJrAW I U. .:.
E)L M I A FIL5VI'...IItV

'U

W

Fillet -o-.Fish.... . .24c
Triple Thick Shakes .. 22c
Delicious Hamburgers 15c
2000 W. Stadium Blvd.

11I1

By TONI PRATT
George Szell and the Cleveland
Orchestra marked the opening of
the 87th season of the University
Musical Society Extra Series last
Wednesday night. Szell; famous
for his fine recordings, and, of
course, for his outstanding con-
ducting abilities, presented an all-
orchestral program, including
symphonies by Mozart and Tchai-
kovsky.
The Moscow Philharmonic Or-
chestra will appear on their first
American tour Nov. 15 and 16. On
opening night, the orchestra will
be under the direction of Kiril
Kondrashin and will feature cellist#
Mstislav Rostropovich.
Varied Programs
The program will offer music of
all types: Brahms Symphony No.
3, Tchaikovsky "Variations on a
Rococo Theme for Cello," and
Richard Strauss' "Don Quixote.
The second night, the orchestra
will host guest-conductor Evgeni
Svetlanov and the renowned vio-
linist, Igor Oistrakh. With the
exception of Debussy's "La Mer,"
all Russian music will be played.
The orchestra will perform Mus-
sorgsky-Shostakovich's "Introduc-
tion to the opera 'Khovantchina',"
R a c hm a n i n o v's "Symphonic
Dances" and the Katchaturian
"Concerto for Violin." Eagerly an-
ticipated by all of America, the
appearance of the Moscow Phil-
harmonic may well be deemed one
of the high points of the series.
The afternoon of Nov. 21 again
marks a double concert, this time.
by the New York City Opera Com-
pany. Critically acclaimed for its
policy of reviving neglected operas
or premiering recently-composed
DIAL 8-6416
HELD OVER!
3RD HIT WEEK!
"YOU CAN'T AFFORD TO
MISS IT I" -New Yorkr
Magazine
TEPAWNBROER

i.

night at 8:30 p.m. It will be open The group gives betw
to the public rithout admission concerts per year her
charge, as are all School of Musicother places in Mich
concerts.nins din
The program will consist of a quintet was started in
compsiton y FanzDanzi, a Albert Luconi, a clarinet
composition by Franz Dazator who is now retired
quintet in G Minor, followed by afonir
world premiere by Michael Head,'In Italy.
a trio for oboe, bassoon and piano.
World Premiere
The third piece is another world 483-4680
premiere: a quintet for winds by "
Florian Mueller who plays oboe in
the quintet. After a short inter-
mission, there will be a last num- 6 am on-CARPEN
ber composed by Paul Taffanel, a FREE CAR HEAT
quintet for wind instruments. F
Mueller states that his compo- ENDS TONIGHT
sition, finished this summer, is
dedicated to the University Wood-
wind Quintet. It has two fast .n..eViiviousAfat:
movements, and, although he is HUNTZ L LEO ,AM
not a "far-out composer," Mueller ALL GORCEY * SI
believes he employs all modern SECOgJD 133
resources. Before joining the quin- 10 STEELP im
tet, Mueller played with the Chi AND
cago Symphony for many years.
Other Members
The other members of the quin-
tet include Lewis Cooper, who pre-
viously played with the Detroit
Symphony, Louis Stout, who has wd i e'-
played with the Chicago Sym- -VANA0-0
phony, the Kansas City Philhar-
monic and the New Orleans Sym- F RST STA
phony, John Mohler, who was RUN TOMC

reen 10-12
e and at
igan. The
1950 by
et instruc-
and living
TER ROAD
ERS
T-
Of
'AWG iK

one, they will put on Leoncavallo's
"Pagliacci" and Mascagni's "Cav-
aleria Rusticana."
Gypsy Orchestra
Also appearing for the first
time in America is the Rumanian
Folk Ballet with its Gypsy Or-
chestra and Singers. This colorful
presentation of national dances!
and music should prove to be novel
entertainment for all who attend
The series will close Mar. 17
With a recital by the celebrated

G
y
1
j
J
1

OtE AT TH tICH LIUN
"THE IPCRESS FILE"
AT THE STATE
"THE FACE OF FU MANCHU"
FOR THEIJ.l r
T AT E
MICHIGAN
THEATREfS

TONIGHT:
/Woodwin(
To Offer
By LINDA WALZER
The University Woodwind Quin-
tet will give a concert in the 7
School of Music Recital Hall to-

I

I

I

DDLE
kRTS
ARROW

I

SUBSCRIBE
TO THE
MICHIGAN
DAILY

an Incredible orgy of
SIGHTS AND SOUNDS
ALSO
Iii
"Tomb of the Cat"
0"t"*

NOTE: Men are welcome at
regular admission price.

!I

WN

This Friday, October 29
GRAD STUDENT MIXER
9-12
VFW HALL-314 E. LIBERTY

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