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October 16, 1965 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-16

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SATURDAY, OCTOBER I6, I965

TIDE MICHIGAN DAILY

PArvR TNRVIC

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY DAI~U' WV~'

vat rI.Aa £LAAj'LjSj

Cuban Exodus Continues, Depresses Economy

By WILLIAM RYAN
Associated Press News Analyst
As long as it is ruled by Com-
munists, Cuba may never recover
from the damage inflicted on its
economic and cultural life by the
flight of talented people, and the
damage now is being compounded,
A new exodus, spurred by Fidel
Castro's offer to permit those who
so desire to leave, will take away
many more people. The island na-
tion of seven million already has
been stripped of many of its ablest
citizens.
Th result is bound to drive the
Cuban economy even lower, to
reduce the over-all living standard
and depress the cultural level of
Cuban life.
Castro obviously must have rea-
sons for permitting a free wave
of emigration. Many of the people
who resent his regime are security
risks and he may consider him-
self well rid of them. Some are

economic liabilities, if their fam-
ilies already are abroad. And, in
any event, Castro is making pro-
paganda and can possibly hope to
make things awkward for Uncle
Sam.
However, he also is and has
been heavily damaging his nation.
A survey by the U.S. Department
of Health, Education and Welfare
of the Cubans who fled to the
United States in the past indicates
the list is weighted heavily on the
side of skilled persons. The num-
ber of unskilled adults fleeing
Cuba has been relatively small.
For example, available statistics
indicate about 2000 physicians
have left Cuba since 1961. This
represented one-third of all quali-
fied Cubans in the ranks of a
profession which had been highly
regarded before the revolution.
As a result, experts report, medi-
cal services in Cuba had nowhere
to go but downward. Medical

technicians and nurses had to be
upgraded to take over, and medi-
cal services suffered.
The Cubans have lost about 200
nurses, 250 dentists, 100 veterinar-
ians important to an agrarian
economy, 300 pharmacists and 60
optometrists.
About 100 of the nation's chem-
ists and 400 of its engineers have
fled. This is bound to hurt a small
nation whose chemists and en-
gineers are vitally important to
maintaining the sugar industry
and other agriculture on which
the economy is based. The results'
have been visible.
The Cubans have lost scores of
editors, painters, architects, writ-
ers, 1500 lawyers and about 3000
educators.
Add to all this the loss to the
economy of high-grade people who
are political prisoners, and Cuba
looks like a nation with bleak
future. By Castro's own figures

there are 15,000 political prison-
ers. U.S. estimates put the figure
at 30,000. Whether they are re-
leased to emigrate or not, they are
and have been inoperative -and
therefore must be added to the loss
of 180,000 others who fled the
country since 1961.
Washington now expects pos-
sibly 50,000 more Cubans to come
to the United States. Some sources
estimate that as many as 350,000
Cubans wait hopefully for a
chance to leave.
If these are people who had the
alertness and means to remove
members of their family to the
United States previously-thus
now eligible for the family reunion
program-they probably . can be
classed among Cuba's higher grade
citizens whose skills also would be
important to the nation.
The heaviest blows to Cuba's
economic and cultural life must
date from 1961, after Castro clear-

ly was turning the nation to Com-
munist dictatorship.
There had been four distinct
stages of exodus and now a fifth
is beginning. The first came early'
in 1959 when the Castro revolu-I
tion took over. Its impact on the
country would have been light,
since it was made up of a relative-I
ly small group identified largely
with the fallen regime of Fulgen-
cio Batista.
A new stage began in the sum-
mer of 1959 and lasted about a
year. These were from the ranks
of the people in the upper classes
who still were able to bring much
of their wealth with them. The
numbers still were relatively small.
The third stage was the most
important, economically to Cuba.
This largest group of all was made
up predominantly of middle-class
persons. These were trained, edu-
cated people who would corre-
spond to an upper middle class in

the United States. This exodus
of people-who left all they owned
behind them-was occasioned by
events such as the Castro declara-
tion of Communist faith and the
abortive Bay of Pigs invasion. The
exodus continued until the Oc-
tober 1962 crisis occasioned by
the U.S. showdown with Moscow
over the presence of Soviet mis-
siles in Cuba.
A new stage began in 1963, with
small groups fleeing on their own
resources. This was made up of
all types of persons, but statistics
indicate many if not most were
from the lower class ranks.
The fifth stage, now beginning,
is likely to cut into important
economic areas of Cuba. The ma-
chinery to provide for these people
indicates that they can be ac-
cepted, at a maximum, at the rate
of about 5000 a day. But even
while they wait, they are of little
use to the Cuban economy.

-Associated Press

WEARY. CUBAN EXILES arrive at Key West, Fla., following
Fidel Castro's statement granting those who wish to emigrate
permission to leave the island.

Indonesian

Army

Drivel

Turns

Against

I

Jinese
Youths Burn

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*WE TUST SEEM To BE ?oU1NDMHIS FEET INTO THE 6ORUN>O'
U.S. Claims 380 Viet Cong
Killed in Past eek's Action

Pro-Chinese
University
Riot Follows Charge
That Communists
Backed Coup Attempt
JAKARTA, Indonesia W) - A
mob's destruction of a Jakarta
university has pointed up an anti-
Chinese turn in the army cam-
paign against the Indonesian
Communist party, the PKI.
About 800 Indonesian youths'
burned the two-story school to the
ground Thursday amid shouts of:
"Down with Communism!"
They fought with 60 Red Chi-
nese students outside a dormitory.
Witnesses said knives and guns
flashed and several were injured'
on both sides.
First
It was the first time that the'
demonstrators, largely nationalist
and Moslem youths who burned
the PKI headquarters here last'
Friday, had attacked a- Chinese
installation.
Indonesian troops, who are gen-
erally watching such disorders
idly, finally intervened.
The attack on the university
followed publication by Karya
Ghakti, one of the Jakarta papers
the army allows to operate, of a'
charge that the Communist
Chinese intelligence agency mas-
terminded and supported the at-
tempted coup of the "Sept. 30'
Movement."
Slap
It was an indirect blow at Pres-
ident Sukarno's policy in recent
years of aligning Indonesia more
and more with Mao Tze-tung's Pe-
king regime in sniping at the
West.'
The army-controlled Radio Ja-
karta announced Sukarno met
with his chief aides in continuing
efforts to "normalize the situa-
tion." One on hand was Third
Deputy Premier Chaerul Saleh,
who evidently has just returned
from a visit to Red China.
In a Thursday news conference
where he announced the appoint-
ment of Maj. Gen. Suharto as the
new army commander, Sukarno
looked slightly drawn and a little
nervous.
Officer
Suharto is the anti-Communist
officer who led the troops that
crushed the leftist uprising. He
succeeds Maj. Gen. Achmad Yani,
one of six generals tortured and
slain by the rebels. There were
reports Sukarno wanted to name
somebody else and the high com-
mand turned thumbs down.
The official news agency An-
tara quoted the president as say-
ing he will soon find a political
settlement.
Give Me Time
"Wait and see," he said. "Leave
it to me."
A high government official has
said Sukarno is considering plans
to create a new Communist party,
not oriented toward Peking, to
replace the PKI, long one of his
sources of power.
Meanwhile
On the other hand, leaders of
th semiofficial National Front
organization have declared any
new Red Indonesian party also
should be destroyed.
Concern at the possibility of
further outbreaks remained evi-
dent.

Church Vote'
Lifts Blame
From Jews
Council Declares End
To Age-Old Discord;
Rejects Anti-Semitism
VATICAN CITY ()-The Vati-
can Ecumenical Council accepted
Friday an historic declaration
aimed at ending 2000 years of dis-
cord between Catholic and Jew.
It says all Jews cannot be blamedE
for Christ's crucifixion.
The bishops of Roman Cathol-
icism gave 7-1 approval to the
document, which also praises the
spiritual values of other non-'
Christian faiths and rejects all
discrimination - especially anti-1
Semitism.
By a final vote of 1,763 to 250
the bishops accepted the dec-
laration-titled "On the Church's1
Attitude Toward non-Christians"
-for promulgation by Pope Paul
VI as a Church decree binding on
all the world's Roman Catholics.
Deletions
The secific mention of "deicide"
-God killing-was deleted fromS
the version given final endorse-
ment, and the document speaks
out against any description of the
Jewish people as "rejected by God
or accursed."
Probably no document had
arounsed so much controversy at
the 4-year-old council and an
anonymous threat Friday against
St. Peter's Basilica added an ele-
ment of tension.
Never before has any general
council in 20 centuries of Cathol-
icism taken such positive stands
on the Jewish and other non-
Christian religions.
Doctrine
While the document amounts to
a restatement of existing church
doctrine, it pointedly warns
against any conduct that some-
times has existed-preaching or
cathechism instruction that could
twist the gospels into an anti-
Semitic interpretation.
Historic, too, are its words of
respect for the beliefs of Moslems,
Hindus, Buddhists and other non-
Christians and its reproach of any
discrimination because of race,
color, condition in life or religion
as "foreign to the mind of Christ."
The declaration takes passing
note of. the Crusades against Is-
lam in the Middle Ages by saying
that over the centuries "quarrels
and hostilities have arisen be-
tween Christians and Moslems."
It urges that the past be forgotten
and that "mutual understanding"
move forward.
Says Rhodesia
Decision Near
SALISBURY, Rhodesia - After
an informal Cabinet meeting Fri-
day night Prime Minister Ian
Smith told newsmen a decision on
Rhodesia's threatened unilateral
declaration of independence was
near.
Smith said he thought the de-
cision would be taken at the next
full cabinet meeting, but did not
say when this would be. He im-
plied it would come before the
next regular cabinet meeting
Tuesday.
Britain has threatened econom-
ic sanctions if this white-ruled
colony breaks away. The British
want the 3.8 million Africans of
Rhodesia to get the vote. They
are now governed by the 250,000
whites.

UNITED NATIONS (R) - The
U.S. delegation walked out on
Cuban Foreign Minister Raul Roa
yesterday to show disdain for a
speech in which he denounced
U.S. policy in Viet Nam and de-
manded independence for Puerto
Rico.
It was the first time the United
States had boycotted a General
Assembly speech sources said.
U.S. Ambassador Arthur J.
Goldberg came back later to de-
ride Roa for the flight of Cubans
from their native land-including
23,000 who have sought refuge in
the Commonwealth of Puerto
Rico.
Bizarre
Ambassador Goldberg said the
United States found "unusually
bizarre his crocodile tears about
the Commonwealth of Puerto
Rico."
"We do not see any exodus of
Puerto Ricans to Cuba," Goldberg
observed. "We do see over 270,000
Cubans who have fled to the Unit-
ed States and many, many more
Cubanstwho are waiting desperate-
ly for the chance to leave."
Goldberg added that the Puerto
Ricans have taken advantage of
repeated opportunities for free
elections to exercise their right to
self-determination.
Promise
'"By' contrast, despite repeated
promises by Fidel Castro, Cuba
has yet to have a free election
since he came to power," he said.
He said that the statement on
Viet Nam made by Roa, "sup-
ported by a disciplined claque in
the gallery, is just about what we
would expect from the represen-
tative of Cuba, and does not merit
a detailed reply."
Roa received scattered applause
from a small group in the public

UNITARIAN STUDENT GROUP
WILL BE MEETING
SUNDAY, OCT. 17, 7:30 P.M.
JOHN HORNBECK, LAW SCHOOL '66
WILL SPEAK ON LEGAL ASPECTS OF
CIVIL RIGHTS IN THE SOUTH
RIDES WILL BE AT MARKLEY & THE UNION
AT 7:15

gallery, and also some from the
Soviet bloc and Albania. Soviet
Foreign Minister Andrei A. Gro-
myko shook Roa's hand as he
came to the rostrum.
Away
Goldberg said the assembly was
aware that "fighting continues
only because Hanoi will neither
halt its aggression, nor agree to
negotiate."
Roa studded his speech with
denunciations of the U.S. inter-
vention in the Dominican Re-
public, which he said proved to
the world the failure of U.S. policy
in Latin America.
"Asia, Africa and Latin Amer-
ica are boiling, and Yankee im-
perialism is impotent to stop the
people," he said.
He supported admission of Com-
munist China and the expulsion of
the Chinese Nationalists, refer-
ring to the latter as "ventrilo-

UNITED NATIONS:
U.S. Delegation Walks Out as
Cuban Attacks Viet Policy

quist's dummies of Yankee im-
perialism."
The 117-nation assembly wound
up its general policy debate late
Friday after hearing a record 101
speakers. The debate opened on
Sept. 23.
Roa asserted that U.S. policy in
Viet Nam ,has Imitated that of
the Nazis, and thatt the only way
the United Nations could con-
tribute to a peaceful solution was
to support the demands of the
Viet Coig and Communist North
Viet Nam.
Walkout
U.S. Ambassador Charles W.
Yost walked out of the hall as
Roa went to the rostrum. The only
person remaining at the U.S. dele-
gation desk was Mrs. Kirsten
'Paulos, a foreign affairs officer
in the permanent U.S mission to
the United Nations. She took notes
on Roa's speech.

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FOR GRADUATE ENGINEERS IN THE
GRAPHIC ARTS FIELD

and

SAIGON (A)-U.S. and South
Vietnamese officials claimed Fri-
day more than 380 Viet Cong
were killed in battles the past
week. A U.S. spokesman said, how-
ever, the Vietnamese claim of 218
guerrillas killed was unconfirmed.
U.S. officials said 129 Viet Cong
were killed and 161 suspects cap-.
Lured in American offensives this
week in the central highlands and
the jungle north of Saigon..
U.S. officials said 45 Viet Cong
were killed and 46 suspects cap-

tured in the joint U.S.- Vietnamese
operation in the central highlands
and 115 suspects captured in the
drive by the troops of the 173rd
Airborne Brigade and Australian
forces in the "Iron Triangle"
about 30 miles northeast of Sai-
gon.

Claimed
Vietnamese made

The
claims:

these

-One hundred sixty-eight guer-
rillas killed in a battle Wednes-
day night with about 500 Viet

World News Roundup

Cong in the Mekong River delta
95 miles southwest of Saigon. Gov-
ernment losses in the five battal-
ions taking part were termed mod-
erate but one company took heavy
casualties.
-Fifty Vjet Cong killed Thurs-
day in Binh Duong Province 20
miles northwest of Saigon against
light government casualties.
Kill 39
-Thirty-nine guerrillas killed
in an operation that has been go-
ing on for a week south of Hue, in
the northernmost sector of South
Viet Nam.
A ' U.S. spokesman said neither
the delta nor Binh Duong claims
have been confirmed.
Troops of the U.S. Army's 1st
Infantry Division reported spora-
dic contact with the Viet Cong in
the same area of Binh Duong
Province Friday but said there
were no casualties to either side.
U.S. troops reported only spora-
dic contact with the enemy.
Four U.S. Army helicopters were
shot down Thursday in the central
highlands, 280 miles northeast of
Saigon, as 8000 troops of the 1st
Air Cavalry Division ended their
five-day operation in the Suai Ca
Valley. U.S. casualties were term-
ed light.

singing a few things
on October 16

*

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door opens at 8:30
free food begins

at 8 :30

Stop by and relax
your mind.

By The Associated Press
CAPE KENNEDY, Fla.-The
Titan 3 military space rocket pro-
peled a "space switch engine" into
orbit yesterday, but the payload
tumbled out of control and achiev-
ed. only two of 10 planned igni-
tions.
Air Force officials said the Titan
3, most powerful rocket ever
launched by the United States,
had achieved most major objec-
tives on its second test flight, but
missed several secondary ones.

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LONDON-Prime Minister Har-
old Wilson suggested in an inter-
view yesterday a common British-
American interest in bringing sta-
bility and security to vast areas
of the East would lead to develop-
ment of "an even closer relation-
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Our representative will be on your campus
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