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October 16, 1965 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-16

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY. OCTOBER 16, 1966

PAGE TWO IRE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1965

WITH FOU TS'ONG:
Mixed Reactions Accompany
Menuhin's Performance

Students Stage Massive FOR SENTIMENTALISTS:
Nation-Wide Viet Protest I 'Children of Paradise' Shows

By J FFREY K. CHASE
Miffed re~ctlons accompanied
the ehudi enuhinmrecital last
evening n 1 Aud
WIth the pinist Fou Ts'ong,
Menuhin performed Mozart's So-
nata for .Violin and Piano, K. 379;
Beethoven's Sonata for Violin and
Piano; No. 10, Op. 96; Debussy's
Sonata in G minor for Violin and
Piano;luand the A major Sonata
by Franck.
Concerning the Mozart and
Beethoven compositions, Menu-
hin's phrasing ftnd nuance were
musically pleasing, but a spirit of
digging right into the meat of
the music seemed lacking. The
performance was too relaxing to
be stimulating and too superficial
to be profound.
Commencing with the Debussy,
the imbalance-which previously
tended to favor the piano-began
to equalize. In addition, the spir-
it of the music improved. The two
musicians were now working to-
gether-occasionally you could see
one turn and smile approvingly at
the other in the true spirit of
chamber ensemble.
As the concert unfolded it be-
came very apparent that the pian-
ist's tones were not sounds to be
dealt with in passing. Mr. Fou is
clearly a pianist with sensitive
awareness of musical style. Espe-
cially commendable is his playing
in very, soft passages. The tones
are solid without being too loud.
The Franck piece is known to
all students of theory as one be-
ginning with. the violin chasing
the piano and then with the piano
chasing the violin. Some of the
most sensitive and spirited play-
1ng of the evening occurred in this
sonata. The 'second and fourth
movements were especially excit-
ing.
Remembering the father-in-law
-son-in-law teams of Toscanini-
DAIL
The Daiy Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a mail-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organiraton notices are not
accepted for publication.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16
Day Calendar
Dept. of Speech High School Debate
Assembly-Rackham Lecture Hall, 9
a.m.
Football-Homecoming, U-M vs. Pur-
due: Michigan Stadium, 1:30 p.m.
Cinema Guild-"Children of Para-
dise": Architecture Aud., 7 and 9 p.m.
Professional Theatre Program Per-
formance-APA Company in Henrik b-
sen's "The Wild Duck": Mendelssohn
Theatre, 2:30 and 8 p.m.
General Notices.
Lecture: Prof. H. J. Lang, Univer-
sity of Tub ingen, Germany, will lecture
on "The Blithedale Romance: Haw-
thorne's Masterpiece," on Mon., Oct.
18 at 4:10 p.m. in Aud. A, Angell Hall.
All interested persons are invited to
attend.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Lehn and Fink Products Corp., To-
ledo, Ohio-Quality Control Manager.
Immed. opening for man, degree in
chem. Some exper. in quality control.
Over 30 yrs. old to manage lab includ-
ing supv. of men.
The Pontiac Press, Pontiac, Mich.-
Reporter, experienced for 6 day daily
In Pontiac.
International Chemical Workers Un-
ion, Akron, Ohio-Vacancies in Res.,

Education, Health & Safety for union
res. or labor educ. Labor union bkgd.
pref., knowl. of econ. and/or soc.
sciences. Considerable travel.
Lockheed Missiles & Space Co., Hunts-
ville, Ala.-Various openings in many
fields including thermodynamics, Gas
Dynamics, Aerodynamics, Geophysicist,
Vehicle Dynamics, Orbit Mechanics, Sta-

Horowitz and Adolf Busch-Rudolf
Serkin, one wonders whether the
similarly related team of father-
in-law Menuhin and son-in-law
Fou Ts'ong will be recorded in the
annals of musical comradeship
with such affection.
Neither of these musicians ever
let their abounding technique or
the temptation to "show off" their
virtuosity impede the flow of the
tones or the shape of the phrases.
Rather, they let the dialogue be-
tween violin and piano speak for
itself.

The Mozart and Beethoven so-
natas were not played with as
much zeal as might have been
desired. This perhaps resulted;
from not enough distinction be-
tween " Allegro," "Andante," and
"Adagio." The program, however,
was pleasing in another musical
sense: the playing was neither
forced nor contrived.,The violin-
ist's tone may not have been all
one desires, but the tones seemed
to flow by themselves. These per-
formers are well above worrying
about correct notes.

{ Continued from Page 1)
In Chicago, there was a minor
scuffle and some egg-throwing
when 40 pickets in front of Roose-
velt University ran into some peo-
ple who didn'tagree that the U.S.
has no business in Southeast Asia.
A bystander smashed a march-
er's placard and tried to land a
punch on the picket, but a police-
man stepped in. No arrest was
made.
Eggs, apparently thrown from
upper windows in one university
building, splashed over the pickets.
The picket line also was joined
by four counterpickets, but there
were no further incidents.
Other demonstrations by dis-
senters to U.S. participation in the
Viet Nam war were held at the
University of Chicago, in Port-
land, Maine, at the University of
California at Santa Barbara,
Wayne State University in Detroit,
in New York, at Colorado Univer-
sity and the University of Texas.
In Washington, a State Depart-
ment official said the marches,
sit-ins and teach-ins are miscon-
strued overseas as a sign of wide
opposition to administration poli-
cies.

draft card, was attended by 100
sympathizers and 200 hecklers who
threw raw eggs and ice cubes
from behind police barriers.
About 100 of a student body of
14,000 at Colorado University pa-
raded in a "march of silence"
from the campus through down-
town Boulder and back. Before
the march, some 200 persons list-
ened to speeches protesting U.S.t
policies.
And in Austin, Tex., 75 to 100c
demonstrators, three wearingE
"death masks," protested on thet
university campus. The Texas1
Civil Liberties Union has demand-
ed the city issue a permit for aE
downtown parade today.
Morse Supportsc
Sen. Wayne Morse (D-Ore)E
spoke out in Washington for the
demonstrators. Morse has long op-.
posed U.S. involvement in Viet
Nam.
"I thank God," he said, that
there are thousands of Americans
ready to protest America's in-E
volvement in the war in Viet Nam.-
Morse predicted more demon-
strations and said he was glad f
there were some people "who will1
not be cowed into submission by
tl-itlran binta uhn bliav

Romantic Visit to French Past

HOMECOMING PARADE:
Crowd Destroys
War Protest Float

(Continued from Page 1)
The policeman calmed the crowd
which was estimated by Dupont
to be about "50 kids" while the
float began to move about 20
miles per hour down South Uni-
versity.
The crowd chased the float as it
turned right at the corner of East
University and South University.
Preparations?
It appeared that the people were
prepared for the violence since
they had eggs with them, Gordon
said. Other reports said that the
violence was spontaneous.
According to Dupont, there was
no physical violence until the float
entered State St. and the Univer-
sity crowd.
"While we were downtown, the
townspeople booed and jeered at
us but no one attacked the float,"
Dupont said.
Dupont explained that the emo-
tional context created by the float

was greatly increased by the break-
down of the parade and the con-
stant halts on State St. The stops
gave the hecklers the oportunity
to break into violence, Dupont
added.
First Trouble
As the float reached the Union
and the first wads of paper were
thrown, one boy asked the police-
man on the corner for help in
calming the potentially agitated
crowd. According to Dupont, the
policeman refused, saying that he
had been in the Marines for three
years.
The policeman said that he did
not think the float had been ap-
proved by the Homecoming cen-
tral committee and thus did not
belong in the parade.
Dupont, however, said that the
group had paid the $10 fee for
entrance in the parade and had
received the cooperation of the
central committee.

Administration Replies Le ILierant11LiJ± wnoev
that because our country is on
Actually, press officer Robert an illegal course of action, we
J. McCloskey said, "the vast ma- must support its illegality."
jority of Americans have indicat-_
ed their strong support" of U.S.I
policy. He characterized the pro-
testors as an "infinitesimal fraAc-
In Chicago, a former U.S. am-
bassador to South Viet Nam, Gen. u
Maxwell D. Taylor, said the pick-
eting may convince Communist
leaders "There is a real division of SATURDAY, OCT. 16
strength in this country and that 9 a.m. - The Department of
may tempt them to prolong the Speech High School Debate As-
war." sembly will be held in the Rack-
Taylor, now a special presiden- ham Lecture Hall.
tial consultant, said North Viet- 7 and 9 p.m. - The Cinema
namese leaders "are on a sharp Guild will present "Children of
hook. They're looking for some- Paradise" in the Architecture Aud.
thing to get them off and they 2:30 and 8 p.m.-The APA will
may think this is it." present Henrik Ibsen's "The Wild
The New York rally, at which Duck" in the Lydia Mendelssohn
a 22-year-old pacifist burned his Theatre.
'7 and 9 p.m. - The University
< ................... :.......:.......::....:::Home coming concerts, "Two Times
Ewill feature famed pianist
MPeter Nero and rhythm-and-blues
4singers The Righteous Brothers at

At The Cinema Guild
By PAUL SAWYER
Made during the dark years.of
the N a z i occupation, Marcel
Carne's "The Children of Para-
dise" is a great burst of nostalgia,
a wistful and unabashedly roman-
tic return to the happier days-of
France's past.
It is also a three-hour-long ex-
amination of the theme of ideal-
ism and reality, of truth and
dreams, executed with an elegance
and style that will enthrall the
sentimentalist and leave some de-
licious morsels for everybody.
Jacques Prevert's screenplay ex-
plores the lives, hopes, and illu-
sions of a group of show people
in the Paris of the 1840's. Lem-
aitre, the dramatic actor (Philippe
Brasseur), is a brash dandy wait-
ing for the world to fall at his
feet; Baptiste, the mime (Jean-
Louis Barrault), is a Gallic Par-
sifal, the romantic dreamer par
excellence and Garance (Arletty)
is a woman of the world loved by
both of them. A passage of six
years finds them successful but
lonely, still clinging to the old
dreams that have passed them by.
Using this simple framework,
Prevert sets up a complex inter-
play between characters, incidents,
and motifs. For example he in-
jects a third suitor named Lace-
naire, a professional misanthrope
whose destructive cynicism con-
trasts with the essential innocence
of the two actors, yet who becomes
a sort of perverse alter ego for
them both.
The most important of the
film's many sub-themes, that of
Baptiste's loss of innocence, is ex-
plored in depth. At the beginning,
Baptiste declares to Garance in a
burst of idealism that he will defy
the "impossible." Later, in one of
his pantomimes, he stabs an old
SAT., OCT. 16
at 11 :30 A.M. & 1:00 P.M.
! ~ SUN., OCT. 17,

tailor representing "the impos-
sible," the constant restraints of
reality-in order to get clothes for
a ball. At the end. Baptiste's full}
destructive potential is revealedj
when, after Garance's return, he
destroys his family's happiness in,
one terrible, wordless act of re-
pudiation.
It is probably true that Pre-'
vert's scenario dips into melo-
drama a bit too often and that
it displays too great a reliance
on romantic conventions and
cliches. The frequent epigrams in
the dialog give one the sense of
deja entendu, and many of the
minor characters, though charm-
ing, are types nonetheless. But,
after all, the setting is "the Paris
of Hugo and Dumas," and Prevert
may have consciously used roman-
ticist building blocks simply to
capture the spirit of the times.
A more serious criticism would
be the bizarre twisting of the plot
near the end. Some vigorously in-
sisted-upon parallels with "Othel-
lo" do not materialize at all, unless
one is to make Lacenaire as an
Iago figure. There is too much
that is inexplicable about it, and
I do not think Prevert knew quite
what he was doing himself.
But the film succeeds by a wide
margin, partly because of the va-
riety and color of its setting, part-
ly because of some brilliantly
imaginative individual scenes, such
as the pantomime sequences. The
photography is consistently well-
handled, with Carne's camera

moving back and forth from stage
to real world, obscuring the dis-
tinction between them and mingl-
ing reality and fancy in much the
same way the characters do in
their own lives. But in the long
run, it is probably the romantic-
ism itself that gives the film as a
whole its irresistible charm and
beauty.
DIAL 8-6416
HELD OVER!
2ND HIT WEEK
"YOU CAN'T AFFORD TO
MISS ITI" -ew Yorker
Magazine

*J

THE PAWMMBRI

1

MICHIA

PLAYING THRU TUESDAY
Dial 5-6290
Shows at
1:00-3:35-6:15-9 P.M.

4

,

YOFFIC
tistics, Meteorology, Circuit Des., etc.
Various degree levels and exper. req.
Continental Can Co., Melvindale,
Mich.-Purchasing & Personnel Trainee.
Immed. opening. Trng. leads to man-
ager position. Degree in Lib. Arts, Bus.
Ad. or working toward degree. No ex-
per. required.

* * *
For further information, please
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of
pointments, 3200 SAB.

call
Ap-

EDUCATION DIVISION:
TEACHER EXAMS-
Professional exams for teachers in
Buffalo Public Schools given Sat., Dec.
11 in Buffalo, N.Y. Applications must
be filed with Supt. of Schools, Attn.:
Div, of Personnel, 720 City Hall, Buf-
falo, N.Y. Exam includes the Na-
tional Teacher Exam. Applications for
this must be filed with the Education
Testing Service, Princeton, N.J., be-
fore Nov. 12. Oral interviews begin ap-
proximately Oct. 11, and will continue
through January 1966.
INTERVIEWS:
TUES., OCT. 19-
Garden City, Mich.-Elem., K-6, Edu-
cable Mentally Handicapped, Psychol-
ogist, Deaf, Speech Corr., Homebound,
Rem. Reading, Emot. Dist., Bus. Ed.,
Ind. Arts, Lib., Vocal Music, Inst.
Music, Counselor, Spanish, French,
Math/Sci., Physics, Chaem., fBi., Home
Ec., Girls PE.
WED., OCT. 20-f
Dearborn Heights, Mich. (Fairlane
Sch. Dist.)-Elem. Speech Corr. (start
now or 2nd semester).
FRI., OCT. 22-
Fraser, Mich.-Elem. 4th., Inst. Mu-
sic, Lib., Speech Corr., Type A, J.H.
Engl./SS, H.S. Ind. Arts.
Dearborn Heights, Mich. (Dist. No.
7)-J.H. Math, Science, Moys PE/Sci-
ence or Math (start now or Dec.).
MON., OCT. 2-
Utica, Mich.-Fields not announced.
THURS., OCT. 28-
Royal Oak, Mich.-Elem., Vocal Mu-
sic, Visiting Teacher, Spec. Ed. (Type
A), Speech Corr., Deaf, Orthopedics, J.H.
Science, J.H. Engl./SS.
FRI., OCT. 29-
Madison Heights, Mich. (Lamphere
Sch.)-Elem. K-6, J.H. Math, Ind. Arts
(start now or 2nd semester).
Saugatuck, Mich.-Grade 3, part-time
Rem. Reading.
International Schools Services-Math/
Set. in Colombia & Dominican Repub-
lic, Engl./SS in Ecuador, Mexico &
Nicaragua, Elem. in Brazil, Colombia,
Guatemala, Laos, Arabian Gulf &
Spain.
* * *
Appointments may be made now.

IAL BUL L
TEACHER PLACEMENT:
The following schools have vacancies
for the present school semester:
Bay City, Mich. (Central H.S.)-H.S.
Girls PE.
Carrollton, Mich.-H.S. Gen. Shop/
Wood Shop/Metal Shop.
Chicago, Ill.--Elem. & H.S. Girls PE.
Clarkston, Mich.-J.H. & H.S. Math,
Ind. Arts.
Patchogue, N.Y.-Elem. Lib., Art, Gen.
Music, Sch. Nurse, PE, Kindergarten,
Primary, Intermediate.
Warren, Mich. (Fitzgerald Sch.) -
Elem. Art.
For additional information and ap-
pointments contact Bureau of Ap-
pointments, Educ. Div., 3200 SAB, 764-
7462.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
VIEWS-Seniors & grad students, please
sign schedule posted at 128-H West
Engrg.
WED., OCT. 20-
Container Corp. of America, Chicago,
Ill.-BS-MS: ChE, EE, ME. Citizens &
non-citizens for temp. practical trng.
R. & D., Des., Prod., Sales.
R. K. LeBlond Machine Tool Co., Cin-
cinnati, Ohio-BS-MS: IE & ME. BA:
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to official-
ly recognized and registered student
organizations only. Forms are avail-
able in Room 1011 SAB.
Guild House, After game cider and
donuts, Oct. 16, after game, Guild
House, 802 Monroe.
* * *

Bus. Admin. Des., Prod., Sales.
Pillsbury Co., All Locations. - BS-
MS: IE, EE, ME, ChE. Sales or Engrg.
Make appointment at Bus. Ad. Place-
ment, 254 Bus. Ad. Bldg.
Quaker Oats Co., Chicago, I11.--BS:
ChE, EE, IE, ME. Dev., Prod., Plant
Engrg.
Sundstrand Corp., Rockford, LaSalle,
Ill., Denver, Colo.-BS-MS: EE, ME,
Met. BS: EM, IE. R. & D., Des., Prod.,
Sales.
U.S. Steel Corp., Monroeville Res. Ctr.,
Pittsburgh, Pa.-Any Degree: ChE, ME,
Chem.-(All phases), Physics. MS-PhD:
Architect, CE, EE, EM, Info. & Con-
trols, Mat'ls., Met. & NA & Marine.
Citizens & PhD non-citizens who can
obtain permanent visa. Res.
U.S. Steel Corp., American Bridge
Div., Chicago & Pittsburgh-BS: CE,
IE. Des., IE Staff.
U.S. Steel Corp., Management Candi-
date openings in Steel Plant Prod. &
Staff, Pittsburgh, Pa.-BS: ChE, CE, EE,
E Math, EM, IE, Mat'Is., ME, Met.,
Chem., Math, & others in Prod. Mgmt.
U.S. citizens & Venezuelan & Cana-
dians for jobs in home country. Prod.
United Tech. Center, Sunnyvale, Calif.
-Any Degree: AE & Astro., ME. BS-
MS: EE. Prof.: Applied Mech. BS-PhD:
ChE. R. & D., Des.
U.S. Govt'., Maritime Admin., Wash-
ington, D.C.-BS-MS: Naval & Marine.
BS: BE & Mat'Is. R. & D., Des.
U.S. Govt., U.S. Army Tank-Automo-
tive Ctr., Warren, Mich.-BS: EE &
ME. R. & D., Des.
WED.-THURS., OCT. 21-22-
Martin Co., Baltimore, Md.-Any De-
gree: AE & Astro., EE, ME. MS-PhD:
Communication Sci. PhD: EM & Nu-
clear. R. & D., Des.
Martin Co., Denver Colo.-Any De-
gree: AE & Astro. & ME. BS, MS, Prof.:
CE. E, Prof.: Applied Mech. BS: EM.
R. & D., Des.

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MASTERFUL!"
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LA SCALA OPERA CO.S''LA BOHEME
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Technicolor Presentation Oct. 20 and 21

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ENDING TODAY
"T HE REWARD"
SUNDAY
Edward Small~
.08 HOPEIUES DAY YI[
FRANKIE AYAION'DINA MERRILL

at 1:00 P.M. ONLY
STATE THEATRE
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TONIGHT at 7and 9 P.M.
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Jean-Louis Barrault's
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Children of
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