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October 12, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-12

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1965

THE MICHIGAN UAllV

T, T 1 9vCa~ flAh t'V

PAGE THREE

Calls

Independence

Next

"TW MAJOR OFFENSIVES:
Al ied Forces Penetrate Viet..Cong Area

Logical Step for Rhodesia

14-B Cloture
Move Halted
In Senate
Fillibuster Goes on
Against Repeal of
Right-To-Work Laws
WASHINGTON (') - Senators
backing a bill to strip the states
of power to ban the union shop
fell far short yesterday in their
effort to choke off a filibuster
by foes of the measure.
And as the unchecked debate
rolled on, Senate Majority Lead-
er Mike Mansfield (D-Mont),
leading the fight for the bill, told
newsmen: "I am disappointed in
the vote. I'll have to think it over
and decide what to do next."
Whatever Mansfield does next,
the vote appears to make certain
that the House-passed bill, back-
ed by President Johnson, will be
shelved until next year. This
would hasten Congress toward ad-
journment, which many members
are demanding with increased in-
sistence.
No Majority
The motion to limit debate fail-
ed to muster even a simple major-
ity. A two-thirds majority of sen-
ators voting is required to limit
each senator to one hour of talk.
The vote was 47-45 against clot-
ure. A check with absentees show-
ed that if all 100 senators had
voted the count would have been
50-50.
Senate Republican leader Ever-
ett M. Dirksen of Illinois, who's
directing the filibuster, said if an-
other attempt of cloture is made
he thinks the vote will be the
same.
Mansfield, whose supporters
never figured they could win yes-
terday, said the Senate will con-
tinue to meet normal hours, with
no day-and-night sessions. Several
other senators said they expect
another showdown later this week.
The vote on cloture is not a
true guide of sentiment on the bill
itself, however.
Second Motion
The filibuster is not against the
measure itself, but against a mo-
tion Mansfield made that the Sen-
take up the bill. If the Senate
votes to take up the measure, there
could be other filibusters on the
bill and on any amendments of-
fered.
The bill would amend the Taft-
Hartley law by repealing section
14B, which permits states to ban
union shop contracts that require
workers to join unions.
Taking note of the strong back-
ing for the repeal measure by
"millions of Americans who are
members of the great labor un-
ions of the nation," Mansfield
said yesterday.
Dirksen, arguing against cloture,
said at stake in the union shop
issue is the "whole question of
freedom" and it is time to edu-
cate the country to what is in-
volved.
"We have a duty to fight," he
said.

-Associated Press
PRIME MINISTER Harold Wilson, left, and Prime Minister Ian
Smith of Rhodesia, right, met yesterday in London to discuss
the possible independence of Rhodesia.
RADIO BROADCAST:
Sukarno Calls for
Return to Peace

KUALA LUMPUR {1P) - Presi-
dent Sukarno of Indonesia told his
government yesterday to "normal-
ize the situation" in the country
in the wake of the attempted pro-
Communist coup Sept. 30, Jakarta
radio reported.
Whether this was an attempt to
hold back the army in its crack-
down on the Indonesian Commu-
nist party was not clear.
The army, after smashing the
coup, has taken over firm con-
trol of Jakarta and has launched
a campaign apparently designed
to break the back of the Commu-
nist party. About 1000 Communists
have been reported arrested so
far.
The broadcast monitored in
Singapore said that Sukarno gave
his directions to his minister for
coordination, Roselan Abdulgani,
at a meeting in the president's
palace.
Sukarno Disapproves
Sukarno at a cabinet meeting
Wednesday in Bogor, 40 miles
south of Jakarta, expressed dis-
approval of the army's campaign

against the Communists.
The Jakarta radio, under army
control, has been giving the im-
pression the military is waging the
anti-Communist campaign on Su-
karno's orders.
Meanwhile in Moscow, the lead-
ers have congratulated Sukarno
for putting down the attempted
coup d'etat against him, the So-
viet news agency Tass said yes-
terday.
Blames Imperialists
The message from Communist
party leader Leonid I. Brezhnev,
Premier Alexei N. Kosygin and
President Anastas I. Mikoyan
blamed the coup attempt on im-
perialist intrigues.
There were reports the Mos-
lems were fanning anti-Commu-
nist fervor in other parts of In-
donesia, including Sumatra.
Jakarta radio said Sukarno had
a separate meeting with Ali Sas-
troamidjojo, chairman of the Na-
tionalist party, the leading poli-
tical organization in Indonesia,
and received assurances the par-
ty will cooperate with the army.

UN Insists
That British
Stand Firm
Britain Insists on
Political Rights for
African Majority
LONDON (P)-Rhodesian Prime
Minister Ian Smith said last night
that disagreement with Britain
over Rhodesia's demand for inde-
pendence "seems to be so wide it
is impossible to bridge it."
"Independence is what we want,
and it is certainly the next logi-
cal step," he told newsmen before
flying home to Salisbury.
Earlier, he had met for 30 min-
utes with Prime Minister Harold
Wilson and apparently heard
Britain's final refusal to grant
the white-ruled African nation
independence. The brief meeting
capped eight days of talks with
Wilson's Labor government.
Recognition
The British insist the political
status of the African population
must be improved immediately and
progress made toward an end of
racial discrimination.
Smith was expected in Salisbury
today for a crucial cabinet meet-
ing that might decide if he will
lead his country into a defiant
rebellion. He is expected to recall
Parliament in the next few days.
At the United Nations in New
York, a resolution introduced yes-
terday by Guinea called on Brit-
ain to use all possible measures
to block a unilateral declaration
of independence by Rhodesia. In
the event of such a declaration,
it demanded that Britain take
"all steps necessary to put an
immediate end to the rebellion."
Support
It had the support of the Asian-
African bloc, the United States,
the Soviet bloc and many Euro-
pean members.
Britain has said it would con-
sider a declaration of independ-
ence by Smith's white minority re-
gime an act of rebellion, but it
has not said it would use force to
suppress such a move.
Business interests in Rhodesia
were particularly concerned over
Britain's threatdof an economic
boycott if the declaration of in-
dependence is made.
Stress Unity
Smith denied disunity reports
on leaving his meeting with Wil-
son. He told newsmen that unity
of the Rhodesian front was
"stronger than ever, this I can
assure you."
When asked if Rhodesia is
bluffing, Smith replied, "Every-
one now realizes how serious we
are. If we can decice to go inde-
pendent, nobody in this world
can stop us."
Meanwhile the United Nations
moved quickly yesterday to put
pressure on Britain to employ
force if necessary against Rhode-
sia in the event that white-ruled
African country declares its inde-
pendence.
Headed for approval in the 117-
nation U.N. Trusteeship Commit-
tee was a toughly worded resolu-
tion introduced by Guinea. It had
the support of the big Asian-Afri-
can bloc, the United States, the
Soviet bloc and many European
members.
The resolution called on Britain
to use "all possible measures" to
block a unilateral declaration of
independence by Rhodesia, and in
the event of such a declaration to
take "all steps necessary to put
an immediate end to the rebel-
lion."

SAIGON (P)-Thousands of al-
lied ground forces stabbed deeper
into Viet Cong territory yesterday
in two big offensives. U.S. air-
craft smashed at the enemy.
The twin offensives, hundreds
of miles apart in the jungles north
of Saigon and the central high-
lands of South Viet Nam, account-
ed for at least 75 Viet Cong dead,
U.S. military spokesmen reported.
Vietnamese sources reported an-
other 60 killed in the highlands
by artillery and air strikes but
the figure was not confirmed by
U.S. authorities.
U.S. casualties were termed light
to moderate in the two operations.
The allied troops - Americans,
Australians and South Vietna-
mese-reported sporadic contact
with the guerrillas in both as-
saults. But no contact was re-
ported with the North Vietnamese
325th Division, reported last week
in the highlands province of Binh
Dinh.
Drop Leaflets
In the air war, U.S. planes
dropped six million leaflets into
the Communist North in the larg-
est leaflet raid of the war. Twelve
U.S. Navy planes hit the Yen
Hoa military area 55 miles inside
North Viet Nam and others struck
targets 150 miles north of the
fronti . U.S. and South Vietna-
mese planes made 344 sorties
against suspected Viet Cong po-

sitions in the past 24 hours in
South Viet Nam.
In the central highlands, Oper-
ation Shiny Bayonet, believed the
largest U.S.-Vietnamese offensive
of the war, went into its second
day with the allies trying to close
a pincer on the Communist guer-
rillas in the Soui La Tinh Val-
ley, 25 miles northwest of An Khe.
Troops of the U.S. 1st Cavalry,
Airmobile, Division reported they
killed 16 Viet Cong and captured
30 others. They were backed by
heavy artillery and air strikes.
A large force of Vietnamese ar-
my and marine units pushed to-
ward the Americans from the oth-
er end of the valley, about 280
miles north of Saigon.
First Move
The operation was the first mass
movement of the highly mobile
"Flying Horsemen" since their ar-
rival in South Viet Nam a month
ago. About 170 of the unit's 428
helicopters went into action and
flew 358 sorties Sunday. Seven-
teen were reported hit by enemy
ground fire and one shot down,
without injury to those aboard,
spokesmen said.
In the dense forests north of
Saigon, paratroopers of the 173rd
Airborne Brigade reported 59 Viet
Cong killed since they and Aus-
tralian troops launched the opera-
tion Friday to clear the area
known as the "Iron Triangle," on

YrTy1 .i4 'i':'aMi'ilwiLy:": }:::4 :'yi+ Y..':':: {ti: 1: :

the fringe of the Communist Zone
D.
Paratroopers moving into one
deserted village yesterday found
entrenchmnents only half dug,
thatched houses falling to pieces
and wooden embattlements sag-
ging under jungle vines. The area
was the scene of four recent dev-
astating raids by Guam-based U.S.
B-52's.
The triangle, near Ben Cat and
about 30 miles north of Saigon,
has been known to harbor the
Viet Cong in force.

More people are

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The paratroopers have used tear
gas three times since the opera-
tion began in an effort to flush
the Viet Cong from their network
of tunnels and trenches in the
triangle. No Viet Cong were found
the first *two times.
In another development, a U.S
spokesman said there are now
144,789 U.S. troops-in South Viet
Nam, including 5000 more mem-
bers of the 1st Infantry Division
which began landing last week.
Another 6000 men of the division
are on the way.

Pardon Our Blooper!
The following names were left off the list
of models for the fashion supplement:
SHELLY BRONTMAN
ELLEN KOTLUS

'A
A13

ANNARBOR BANK
3 CAMPUS OFFICES
C East Liberty Street Near Maynard
" South University at East University
" Plymouth Road at Huron Parkway
And 4 More Offices Serving
ANN ARBOR/ DEXTER
WHITMORE LAKE

CONTROLS PARLIAMENT:
Conservatives Win
Turkish Maj ority

.; ..,w{.: :.;o. : :}"rr"'i:':';a::br'tvX"kv"y ,

ANKARA, Turkey UP) - The
conservative Justice party, led by
a 41-year-old American-trained
engineer, has swept to power in
the Turkish elections.
With 90 per cent of the votes
tallied, unofficial results yester-
day showed the Justice party lead-
ing its nearest rival by more than
30 per cent in Sunday's Natimna
Assembly elections. Officials of
various parties estimated that the

Justice party will end up with 260
of the 450 seats in Parliament.
The lead represented a clearcut
victory for the conservatives and
their young leader, Suleyman De-
mirel is slated to become premier
succeeding Suat Hayri Urguplu,
who was not a candidate.
The leader of the major oppo-
sition Republican People's party,
former Premier Ismet Inonu, con-
ceded the election.
The conservatives campaigned
openly for support from members
of the outlawed Democratic par-
ty of the late Premier Adnan Men-
deres, overthrown by the army in
1960 and later executed for trea-
son.
The vote was a big setback
for the new Turkish Labor party
which campaigned on an anti-
American, pro-Marxist platform.
It appeared it would win only
about 10 seats.

i
s
s

World News Roundup

By The Associated Press
RAWALPINDI - A government
spokesman claimed yesterday that
an Indian "master plan" to in-
vade the East Pakistan Province
has been discovered.
"The plan, found in papers left
behind by Indian army brass on
the West Pakistan front, provid-
ed for a multi-pronged attack on
East Pakistan after overrunning
West Pakistan Province in 72
hours," the spokesman said.
LEOPOLDVILLE - Mercenary
troops and the Congolese nation-
al army have captured Fizi, sec-
ond major objective of a renewed
anti-rebel campaign in the east-
ern Congo, an authoritative source
said yesterday. There were no fur-
ther details.
Government forces still have to
clear an estimated 2000 well-en-
trenched rebels from the sur-
rounding mountains to make the
area between Bukavu and Albert-
yille secure.
* * *
CRAWFORDVILLE, Ga. - A
group of Negro parents in nearby
Warrenton, Ga., coznvinced pupils

at the Negro high school not to
participate in a school boycott urg-
ed by civil right leaders yester-
day.
The proposed boycott of the
Warren County elementary and
high school 18 miles east of
Crawfordville and a march on the
white school in Warrenton were
to be part of the day's prelude to
an evening visit by Martin Luth-
er King, Jr.

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