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October 12, 1965 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-12

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PAGE TWO

TUE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, OCTOBEl, 12; 196 ,

PAGE TWO TUE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY. OCTOBER 12. 1965

w

CHICAGO SYMP'HONY:
Browning Illustrates Merit as
Outstanding, Dynamic Pianist

MISNAMED:

3

'A Rage To Live':

'SHIP OF FOOLS':
Script Frustrates Good Cast

I

By TONI PRATT
John Browning's performance
of the Barber Concerto last Sat-
urday night with the Chicago
Symphony Orchestra confirmed'
critical acclaim that he is one of.
the most dynamic and technically"
sure pianists on today's concert
stage. His reputation is all the
more impressive when measured
against his youth.
Born in Denver, Col., in 1933,
he began lessons at the age of
three. Several years later, a move
to Los Angeles during his second-
ary school years gave Mr. Brown-
ing the opportunity to study under
Lee Pattison. Through an under-
standing with his high ^choolI Mr.
Browning was permitted to take
all major classes during the morn-
ing, leaving his afternoons free
for three or four hours of prac-
ticing.
He attended two years of col-
lege before going to Julliard to
study with the renowned Rosina
Lhevinne. During his last year of
study there and following his
graduation, Mr. Browning won
the Steinway, Centennial Award in
1954, the Leventritt Award in
1955, and the Queen Elizabeth of
Belgium Competition in 1956.
Six months in the army inter-
rupted his career temporarily, but
since that time he has had enor-
mous.success, highlighted by sev-
eral world tours and recordings.
During this tine, Samuel Barber
heard him play, and subsequent-

ly chose him to premiere the Bar-
ber Concerto, which won the Pu-
litzer Prize in 1963.
When asked how such an ex-
tensive career first began to cry-
stallize, Mr. Browning answered,
"I can't put a set date on it; I
just never thought about doing
anything else but being a pianist."
Since he has played so success-
fully in competitive performances,
it was interesting to learn his
opinion of them and of the fair-
ness with which they determine an,
artist's ability.
- "I think most of the major com-
petitions try to be completely ob-
jective in evaluating the contest-
ants, mainly because their judges.
are name figures in the musicalI
world.
With all of the conflicts be-
tween countries today, one might
expect a nation's feelings to be
reflected in their reception of an
artist. But on this matter Mr.
Browning declared, "Quite the
contrary! This past spring I trav-
elled in Europe and Russia on a
State Department tour w it h
George Szell and the Cleveland
Orchestra. One could hardly have
expected a warmer or more enthu-
siastic reception than we got in
Russia.
Any problems there might be
are kept solely on a political lev-
el, and those involved in the cul-
tural exchange program could not

have been more forthright or
friendly.
For a man of his age, Mr.
Browning has an impressive list
of achievements. It could be said
that they are a result of his hard
work, his fine training, or his
poise on stage. But the key is his
complete devotion to his work - a
devotion which comes through his
playing to win the approval of
audiences everywhere.

Another S4
By STEVEN HALLER
At The State Theater
The movie now at the State
Theatre is woefully misnamed: it
should really be called "A Rage
To Love." Nevertheless, "A Rage
To Live" it is, and John O'Hara's
story of the adventures of a nym-
phomaniac pulls just enough
punches to get it past the Butter-
field censors and onto the pro-

oap Opera

gram of la
matinee.
Suzanne1
less line of
ers do ever
to make th
fidelity an a
it remainsL
ter end. Thi
inconsistenc
Grace Cald
Nins your
your stomac
the picture
girl like Su

ast Saturday's kiddie

By PATIA ROSENBERG
At The Michigan

Later in the film, Dunn's look
of horror when the idea hits him
that the Germans will kill all the
German Jews is worth half of

1
f
a

{ ~ Aeross 4
TUESDAY, OCT. 127
8:30 a.m.-The University Man-
agement Seminar will present'1
Clark C. Caskey of the Bureau of
Industrial Relations, speaking on
"Orientation to Supervisory Prac-
tices."
8 p.m.-The department of psy-
chiatry will sponsor Prof. Hans
Hofmann of the Center for the
Study of Personality and Culture,
Cambridge, Mass., speaking on
"Beyond the Superego," in the
auditorium of the Children's Psy-
chiatric Hospital.i
8 p.m.-Raymond Ortali of the
French department will speak in
French on "France on the Eve of
the Presidential Elections" in Rm.
3050 Frieze Bldg.
8 p.m.-There will be a second
meeting to plan action for the

ing in a film
The plot,
Campus it is handle
from soapo
Pleshette is
know.
International-Days of Protest, Oct. emotion, yo
15 and 16, against the war in Viet camera is g
Nam, in the Multipurpose Rm. of I face betwe
the EJGLI. and the sec

8:30 p.m. - The music school
will sponsor a Baroque Trio Re-
cital in the Rackham Lecture Hall.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 13
Noon - The office of religious
affairs will present a discussion of
the book "Steppenwolf," by Her-
man Hessee, led by David W. Sum-
ner, in Rm. 2 of the Michigan
League.1
3 p.m.-The department of ar-I
chitecture will present the film1
"No Time for Ugliness" in the1
Architecture Aud.

particular q
acting or th
picture; it i
ette's fault
dull.
Although
rather than
I'm sure th
tion in this
usual Ann P
might be v
reason. Oth
will prove
Miss Pleshe
now that a

Pieshette and an end- wnat was said before that look.
male supporting play- But for the eloquent faces and As for illusions versus realities,
ything in their power actions of the characters, and the there is, of course, the suicidal il-'
is sordid tale of in- director's subtle groupings of peo- lusion held by one character that
affair to remember, but ple, "Ship of Fools"-thanks to he is "German first and Jew sec-
unpalatable to the bit- a script that is often wordy and ond." There is the pathetic parad-
is is mainly due to the intrusive-might have been just ing of an unsubstantial love by
.y of the unfortunate another would-be "film with a a girl for an' artist, contrasted
well, who alternately profound message": This is a Ship with the simple, tragic affair of
sympathy and turns of Fools (all on the Upper Decks, the ship's doctor and a SpanishF
h. One goes away from please note), and you shouldn't countess, both roles being expres-
wondering what a nice be surprised to find yourself on sively acted by Oscar Werner and
zanne Pleshette is do- board. The actual themes which Simone Signoret.
ilike this. are quite subtly presented, are the The poignant reality of the
and the way in which isolation of people by people, and Countess' involvement in a revo-
d are only too familiar the contrast of illusion with real- lution is contrasted with the im-
peras; and when Miss ity. mature, surly radicalism of the
called upon to say "I When, for example, we see a young artist; the unstudied reac-
group of Germans, whose behav-
u ju knowith strg eor and faces are all too reminis-
oing to dolly in on her cent of Geo g Grosz' sketches of"
-a the first "I know" pre-wvar middle-class Germans,M
cond. Still, I have no seated at one table while a re- 1
uarrel with either the spectable-looking man is isolated DIAL 8-6416
1e technical end of the at another, the man does not need
sn't really Miss Plesh- to say more than "Are you Jew- "YOU CAN'T AFFORD TO
the film is so ih?" to Michael Dunn when DunnNeYk
that tefl ss is sent to that same table. But MliSS IT." -Now Yorker~
the writer draggs out this and
I attended the matinee other points ad nauseam. One can
the evening showing, only thank God that he leaves
at audience participa- some things to the viewers' imag-
one will be up to thei o
Arbor standards, arnd it Iinations.
Aorth seeing for that There was only one scene where
erwise, I doubt that i the events were placed in proper eel
to be a highlight of perspective-in the hilarious ex-
tote caighlihtyfchange between Lee Marvin as an
tte's career, especially Ie-aeal'lyrandMihe
he matinee have rho Dunn as Karl Glocken, the out-
asked mommy what a cast dwarf. But even this is mor
eyeddeadpan, the face of a lech-
:.~:; ! erous. permanently bombed tur-
nip, and Dunn's sensitive, mobile,
rather apprehensive-and of voic-
es-Marvin's, low and pleasantly
metallic, and Dunn's, high and
twangy like a fool's lute. In this. [ inf9[f
s:s::ssa:m. s scene, and throughout the film,
now or Dec' Marvin shows once again that he
is a magnificent and subtle clown.
nal information and ap- RA
ontact the Bureau of Ap -READ
200 SAB. 764-7462. 1 I
[NG PLACEMENT INTER- DEPENDABLE
ors & grad students, please
e posted at 128-H West

1
f
a
{ I
a
t
t

tions of Spanish laborers in the
steerage are contrasted with the
tourist-oriented "-flamenco" of the
"Gypsy" dancers in the upper
decks.
All the members of the cast
are competent, the four mentioned
above, and Jose Ferrer as a Nazi
intellectual, are splendid. It is a
pity the script got ' their way
so often. Go to watch them,
E.
I AT THE MICHIGAN
See "Ship of Fools"

I

A

AT THE STATE
See "A Rage To Live"
FOR THE l I. ^-
C
THEATRES
AttheSpeiaQt
j$
1111 mil E AT E5

8 p.m.-The APA will present attended ti
Henrik Ibsen's "The Wild Duck" home anda
in the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre. "slut" is.

AV A6 ^ . . r r. . ... . ..,. . . . . . . . . . . .... .. . v :.. ..".a"'"'w:a
..I" M1".. ' . " . f. , .~.*,5*~' ~ ~ .4... . . . . . . . .4.ffA."lX* 1N~h:~l"M "Al I "t. "~ rt1~.. ' . 'a " r1~'ll :"~:'::-'.M. .

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

4

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. . ..v.w.Y#*...............................> . " . . rr ......... "."". ."r::r.":::.W. .: .. .~+-.:". .". .Sv:.. "."::. . . . . . . . .

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication 'of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to'
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 12
Day Calendar /
Firemanship Training Program-Reg-
istration, Civil Defense and Disaster
Training Center, 8:30 a.m.
Bureau of Industrial Relations Per-
sonnel Techniques Seminar - Ralph
Nichols, University of Minnesota, sem-
inar leader, "Listening Training for
Managers": Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m.,x
University Management Seminar -
Clark C. Caskey, Bureau of Industrial
Relations, "Orientation to Supervisory
Practices": Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m.
University Management Seminar ,-
Irene Place, qraduate School of Busi-
ness Administration, "Managing the
Departmental Office": 5046, Kresge
Hearing Research Institute, 1:30 p.m.
Art in the Americas Lecture - "A
Romantic Attachment" : Rackham Am-
phitheatre, 7:30 p.m.
Dept. of Psychiatry University Lecture
-Hans Hofmann, Center for the Study
bf Personality and Culture, Cambridge,
Mass., "Beyond the Superego": Aud.,,
Children's Psychiatric Hospital, 8 p.m.
School of Music Baroque Trio Reci-
tal-Rackham Lecture Hall, 8:304 p.m.
General Notices
DOB Notices: In the future please
bring DOB Notices to Room 3519, Ad-
ministration Bldg. before - 2 p.m.
Weekly Calendar Notices should be sent'
to Room 3564, Administration Bldg.
Notice: The Musical Society Concert
of Yehudi Menuhin was listed incor-,
eectly .in the Weekly Calendar. It will
take place Fri., Oct. 15, not Tues.,
Oct. 12.
Economics Lecture: Prof. Gunther
Schmolders of the University of Co-
logne will speak on "Research on
Behavioral Effects of Taxation - A
Tool for a Rational Tax, Policy." The
lecture is on Wed., Oct. 13, at 4 p.m.
in the Multipurpose Room of the UGLI.
Foreign StudentsTuition Scholarships:,
The deadline for receipt of applications
Is Oct. 28, 1965. Fors are available
from the counselors in the Interna-
tional Center.
Doctoral Examination for Carl Harry
Popelar, Engineering Mechanics; thesis:

"Dynamic Stability of a Shallow Cylin-
drical Shell," Tues., Oct. 12, 402 W.
Engrg. Bldg., at 9 a.m. Chairman, I. K.,
Mclvor.
Dante Centennial Observance: Uni-
versity lecture on "Dante's 'Divina Com-
media': The Fifth Dimension," by Prof.
Charles Singleton, of the Johns Hop-
kins University, on Fri., Oct. 15, at 4:10
p.m., in the Rackham Amphitheatre.
Foreign Visitors
The following are the foreigh visi-
tors programmed through the Interna-
tional Center who will be on campus
this week on the dates indicated. Pro-
gram arrangements are being made by
Mrs. Clifford R. Miller, International
Center,764-2148.
Andres Hoogerwerf, assistant profes-
sor at the Free University, Political
Science, Amsterdam, The Netherlands,
Sept. 27-Oct. 17.
F. N, Ciorascu; professor of physics,
Bucharest, Rumania, Oct. 10-12.
Dr. Lawrence N. Short, director, edu-
cational research unit, University of
New South Wales, Kensington, New
South Wales, Australia, Oct. 11-13.
C6uichi Suzuki, president, Legal
Training Research Institute of the Su-
preme Court of Japan, Tokyo, Japan,
Oct. 17-21.
Five student leaders from Spain: An-
tonio. Gimenpo Guspinera, University
of Madrid; Antonio Elzora y Domin-
guez, University of Madrid; Alfonso
Sureda Carrion, University of Barce-
lona; Jaime Quintana Gomez, Univer-
sity of Valladolid; Jose Ramon Bar-
raca de Ramos, University of Madrid;'
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to official-
ly recognized and registered student
organizations only. Forms are avail-
able in Room 1011 SAB.
* * *
Cercle Francais, Meeting, Oct. 12,
s p.m., 3050 Frieze. Raymond Ortali,
of Romance Language Department, will
speak on the coming elections in
France. (Lecture will be in French.)
* * *
Young Americans for Freedom, Sec-
ond general membership meeting of the
semester, Oct. 13, 7:30 p.m., Room 3-
B, Michigan Union.
* *' *
Young Republicans, Three weeks due
notice is hereby given for the an-
nual (election) meeting of the Univer-
sity of Michigan Young Republican
Club, Nov. 9, 7:30 p.m., Rooms KLMN,
Union.f
* * *
Young Republicans, Executive Board,
meeting, Oct. 12, 4 p.m., Room 2535
SAB.
* * *
U. of B. Amateur Radio Club, Meet-
ing, Wed., Oct. 13, 7 p.m., in 4511 E.
Engineering.

John Cendoya, interpreter, Oct. 17-21.
Marton Pesci, director of the Insti-
tute of Geography, Hungarian Academy
of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary, Oct.
17-22.
Mrs. Marton Pesci, lecturer at the
Petrographical Dept., University of Bu-
dapest, Budapest, Hungary, Oct. 17-22.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:'
National, Security Agency - NSA
announces the 1965 Professional Quali-
fication Test for Liberal Arts majors
(degrees by Sept. 1966). Test req. be-
fore NSA interview for employment.
Deadline for test registration is Oct.
13 for test given Oct. 23. Also 1966
Summer Language Institute in Far
Eastern and Middle Eastern Languages.
Above language majors (or equivalent
proficiency), 3 yrs. toward undergrad
degree by June 1966, and a "B" aver-
age. Apply now. Deadline for registra-
tion is Oct. 22. Bulletins & applications
available at Bureau of Appointments,'
3200 SAB.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS: Bureau
of Appointments-Seniors & grad stu-
dents, please call 764-7460 for appoint-
ments with the following:
THURS., OCT. 14-
Argonne National Lab., Argonne, Ill.
-Men & women. MS & PhD's in Math
& Chem. (Anal., Gen., Inorg., & Phys.).
Positions in R. & D. In math, micro-
biol., computational theory & practice,
physics, particle accelerator dev., etc.
Summer Employment opportunities for
seniors & grads in math, chem., &
engrg, should report to Room 212, SAB
at 4 p.m. for a group interview.,
Chase Manhattan Bank, N..YC.--De-
grees in Econ., Gen. Lib. Arts & Law,
for positions in banking. Located in
N.Y.C. and overseas branches. U.S.
citizenship not req. Permanent visa
needed.
Foote, Cone & Belding, Chicago --
PA & MA's in Econ., Fine Arts, Gen.
Lib. Arts, & Journ. for positions in
advtg., art & des., mkt. res. & copy
writing.
FRI., OCT. 15-#
Jones & Laughlin Steel Co., Pitts-
burgh, Pa.-Men & women. Majors in
Econ., Foreign Lang., Gen. Lib. Arts,
Journ., etc. for territorial sales. Lo-
cated in Detroit.
General Foods Corp., White Plains,
N.Y.-BA's & MA's in Econ., Gen. Lib.
Arts, Journ., Poli. Sci., etc. All de-
TARNISHED?

gree levels in Biochem. & Chem. Po-
sitions in Advtg., Mgmt. Trng., Mkt.
Res., Personnel, Prod., Purchasing, Ter-
ritorial Sales, Statistics, R. & D. Lo-
cated throughout U.S.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Northern Trust Co., Chicago-Opera-
tions Research positions. Advanced de-
gree in Science, Engrg., Econ., Indust.
Admin., etc. Exper. in research. Open-
ings in mgmt. info. systems, econ.,
forecasting, bond bidding, etc.
Velsicol Chem. Corp., Chicago - En-
tomologist, PhD pref. for field dev. pro-
grams, etc. 40 per cent travel. Also
nematologist. PhD pref., plant path-
01. major, minor in nematol. Set up
programs for field testing of fungicides
& nematocides.
Gray Harbor Paper Co., Hoquiam,
Wash.-Project Engr. BSME, 3-5 yrs.
exper, in paper Indust. Willing to learn
mill operation.-
Ideal, Industries, Sycamore, Ill. -
Mech. Engr. BS plus 4-10 yrs. exper.,
for prod. dev., econ des., & pilot run
activities. Also similar position ayail-
able but degree not req.
* * *

Math. (Startn
For additio
pointments c
pointments, 3
ENGINEERI
VIEWS-Senio
sign schedul

NOTE: Men are welcome at
regular admission price.

For further information, please
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of
pointments, 3200 SAB.

call
Ap-

SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAB-
Camp Fernwood, Maine-Girls. Inter-
views Mon., Oct. 18 from 10-12 a.m. &
1:30-5 p.m. Vacancies in tennis, swim-
ming (WSI req.), sailing. Counselors
for Arts & Crafts.
TEACHER PLACEMENT:
INTERVIEWS-
The following schools will interview
candidates the week of Oct. 18, 1965:
TUES., OCT. 19--
Garden City, Mich.-Elem. K-6' Edu-
cable Mentally Handicapped, Psychol-
ogist, Deaf, Speech Corr., Homebound,
Rem. Read., Emot. Dist., Bus. Ed., Ind.
Arts, Lib., Vocal Music, Inst. Music,
Counselor, Spanish, French, Math/Sci.,
Physics, Chem., Biol., Home Ec., Girls
PE.I
WED., OCT. 20-
Dearborn Heights, Mich. (Fairlane
Sch. Dist.)-Elem., Speech Corr: (start
now or 2nd semester).
FRI., OCT. 22-
Fraser, Mich.-Elem. 4th, Inst. Mu-
sic, + Lib., Speech Corr., Type A, J.H.
Eng./SS, H.S. Ind. Arts.
Dearborn Heights, Mich. (Dist. No. 7)
-J.H. Math, Sci., Boys PE/Sci. or

Engrg.
THURS., OCT. 14-
General Foods Corp.-BS-MS: ChE,
EE, EM. IE, ME. BS: E Math, Sci.
Engrg. MS: Info. & Controls. R. & D.,
Des., Prod.
Merck & Co., Inc., Rahway. N.J.;
Danville, Pa.; Elkton, Va.-Any De-
gree: ChE. Citizens & non-citizens be-
coming a citizen. R. & D., Prod.
THURS.-FRI., OCT. 14-15-1
American Oil Co., Whiting Ind. -
Any Degree: ChE. BS-MS: CE, ME. Non-
citizens considered for temp. practical
training-must have permanent visa.
Des., Prod.
Union Carbide Corp,, Linde Division
-BS-MS: ChE, CE, EE, EM, IE, Mat'ls.,
ME, Met. MS: Constr. R. & D., Des.,
Prod., Sales.
FRI., OCT. 15-
Ethyl Corp., Baton Rouge. La.-Any
Degree: ChE, ME. BS: Set. Engrg. Citi-
zens & non-citizens becoming citizen.
R. & D., Des., Prod.
Jones & Laughlin Steel Corp., De-
troit, Pittsburgh, Pa. - Any Degree:
ChE, Matls., Met. BS: CE,EE, EMath,
EM, E Physics, IE, ME, Set. Engrg.,
Math, Set. Major, Ec. MS: Info. &
Controls. Dec. grads. R. & D., Ind.
Engr. & Prod.-(Math, Set. & Ec.-All
for Ind. Engrg.).
Pure Oil Co., Refineries-Midwest &
West Coast-BS-MS: ChE & ME. Prod.
483-4680
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665-3688

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"AN EVENT! FASCINATING!I
MASTERFUL! Epi
-TIME
Vivien Leich, Jose Ferer, Simone Simone, Lee Marvin
LA SCALA OPERA CO.S "LA BOHEME"
TICKETS NOW ON SALE
Technicolor Presentation Oct. 20 and 21

A

ENDING WEDNESDAY
Shows at 1 -3-5-7 & 9.05

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the way to get a brand new looking car without the
long, drawn out payments. Let our paint and body de-
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We paint, repair and replace. Stop in today for a free
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O-L-D-S-M-O-B-I-L-E I

TOMORROW
JAMES"
~~STEWART
rs NECH'AN C0LR J
SHNANOA
DOUG MCCLURE - GLENN CORB[T-PATRICK WAYN[
KATHlARINE ROSS ROSEMARY FORSYTHI
PLUS
RELEASE

I

I

THE
WILD DUCK
by
HENRIK IBSEN
A new version
of the poignant drama
Directed by
Stephen Porter
Set Designer: James Tilton
Costume Designer: Nancy Potts

YO .CNTAKE IT
E4
"WITH YOU'
by
GEORGE S. KAUFMAN
and MOSS HARTk
The classic
American comecdi!
Directed by
Ellis Rabb
Set Designer: JaMeS Tiltoml
Costume Designer:- NanCy Potta

THE IlRlSGfl R A G E
0 TA l*L~ R#NSUZANNE PLESHElTE
BRADFORD DILMAN
-BEN GAZZRA A~s
RUCEASEO 1HARU
PANAVISION' UNITED ARTISTS
> THURSDAY
EFREM ZIMBALIST JR.
IN
"THE REWARD"a

Oct. 6,7,8

Oct 9,10

I

PROF. RICHARD L. MEIER
Of the Mental Health Research Institute
will talk at the Daily
at8 P.M. TUESDAY, Oct. 12

.

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Phone: 668-6300

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LAST CHANCE LECTURE

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