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October 09, 1965 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-09

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SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGER THRE

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9,1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY VA(~V TTIRWK

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TALKS COLLAPSE:
Britain Fears Rhodesian
Declaration of Independence

New

Strike

Settlement

C

Gall1Bladder
Removed
Johnson Pronounced
Ready To Make Any
Necessary Decisions
WASHINGTON (A) -President
Johnson underwent a 2 -hour
operation yesterday and his family
doctor said it went beautifully.
Three hours after the surgery was
over, a top aide pronounced John-
son ready to make any presiden-
tial decisions that might be neces-
sary.
"The operation was a complete
success," said White House press
secretary Bill D. Moyers, after
a team of greenrobed surgeons
removed Johnson's gall bladder
and a stone that had formed in
his kidney.
Moyers said at midday he be-
livs Johnson able to make any
decisions that might be needed.
"Were he not able to make
those decisions," Moyers told re-
porters in response to a question,
"procedures are in effect which
would make certain those deci-
sions are made."
Humphrey On Stand-by
That is the arrangement under
which Vice-President Hubert H.
Humphrey can act in an emer-
gency if the hospitalized President
cannot.
Less than two hours after he
was wheeled, under general an-
esthetics, from the Bethesda Naval
Hospital operating room, Johnson
was reported asking questions
about the business of the presi-
dency.
Operation A Success
Moyers relayed this report from
Dr. James C. Cain, a transplanted
Texan now with the Mayo Clinic
of Rochester, Minn,, anc John-
son's personal physician:
"Everything went, in his words,
beautifully and as expected."
Johnson spent two hours and
45 minutes in the operating suite
after the surgery was completed.
Thank-You's
Before he was placed under an-
esthesia, he gave Moyers some
assignments: thank House mem-
bers who worked until the early
morning hours to pass a highway
beautification bill he and Mrs.
Johnson want enacted; cable a
quick report on the surgery to
Gen. William C. Westmoreland,
the U.S. commander in Viet Nam,
"so that our men in Viet Nam
wil know of my progress."
Dr. George A. Hallenbeck, a
surgeon from the Mayo Clinic,
removed Johnson's gall bladder.
It contained a stone about a half-
inch in diameter.
Dr. Ormond Clup, a urologist
from the same clinic, removed the
other stone, which was found in
Johnson's ureter, which is a tube
leading from the kidney to the
urinary bladder.
Another Stone?
His doctors had not mentioned
the possibility of another kidney
stone, but Moyers said X-rays had
indicated its possible existence.
"The decision to remove the
uretal stone was made in the
operating room this morning by
the doctors concerned," he said.
The stone was ragged and about
a quarter-inch in diameter.
It partially blocked the right
ureter.
10-14-Day Stay
Moyers said the extra surgery,
in which the ureter was opened by
incision and the stone removed,
does not change the prognosis for
recuperation Hallenbeck's esti-
mate of Johnson's time in the

hospital: 10 to 14 days.
Humphrey, as stand-by presi-
dent, said he was kept fully in-
formed on Johnson's condition.
He left his suburban Maryland
home after receiving word the
surgery had begun, and drove to
the Executive Office Building,
across from the White House.
In that office, just before the
public announcement, he got word
from Moyers that the operation
had been successful. Later, with
Johnsonnreported doing well, he
went to Capitol Hill to preside
over the Senate.

-Associated Press
A GEORGIA STATE TROOPER knocks down a Negro girl, and puts a flying tackle on a Negro
youth, as they attempt to break through police lines and board school buses with white residents
of Crawfordville.
Negroes March on Courthouse
To emand esegregat ion

Guildsmen's
Ratification
Anticipated
KheePs Plan Solves
Job Security Issue;
Safeguards Offered
NEW YORK ()-A tentative
agreement between the AFL-CIO
New York Newspaper Guild and
the strikebound New York Times
yesterday paved the way for an
end to the city's 23-day partial
newspaper blackout.
All that was needed to get the
presses rolling again on six closed
dailies was ratification of the
peace terms by the Guild unit of
the Times. Strike leaders forecast
a favorable vote.
The balloting was set for 1 p.m.
EDT tomorrow, indicating the
papers could be back on the streets
with Monday morning editions-
their first since the Times strike
began Sept. 16.
Accept Recommendations
He said both sides had accept-
ed recommendations originally
made by his labor epert, Theo-
dore Kheel. The same proposal
had been turned down Thursday
by the Guild and the Times.
The accord requires ratifica-
tion by the 2,200-member Guild
unit at the Times.
The New York Post has pub-
lished throughout the strike, and
the Herald Tribune resumed pub-
lication Sept. 27. These two papers
have withdrawn from the Pub-
lishers Association of New York.
Close Papers
Members of the association
closed their papers, charging a
breach of contract when mechani-
cal unions refused to cross picket
lines at the struck Times.
John J. Gaherin, president of
the publishers association, said
the five suspended dailies would
resume publication "as soon as
practicable."
Kheel's peace formula led Wag-
ner to call Guild and Times ne-
gotiators to City Hall for an
emergency meeting. There the
mayor urged the negotiators to
reconsider the formula.
Job Security
Chief issues in the Guild-Times
deadlock involved job security in
the face of automation, pensions
and the union shop.
Kheel's proposal called for a
separate pension fund for Guild
employes of the Times, with the
newspaper contributing to it a
percentage of employe earnings.
The Guild's demand for veto
rights over the introduction of
labor-saving automation devices
into the Times was overruled by
Kheel. However, he recommended
safeguards in job jurisdiction un-
der automation for the Guild.
Kheel proposed the union shop
for the Times commercial de-
payrtment, but ruled it out for the
editorial department of the news-
paper.

LONDON (U)-Talks on inde-
pendence for Rhodesia collapsed
last night. This raised fears the
white-ruled African colony may
proclaim sovereignty on its own
in a break from Britain that
could damage both economically
and perhaps set off a race war.
A week of negotiations left the
prime ministers of the two gov-
ernments, Harold Wilson of Brit-
ain and Ian Smith of Rhodesia,
at loggerheads.
"Despite intensive discussion, no
means have been found of recon-
ciling the opposing views," a joint
communique said. "No further
meeting has been arranged."
African Majority
A major issue is the future of
Rhodesia's 3.9 million Africans,
who are ruled by 250,000 whites.
The Africans are counting on
Britain to prevent Smith's gov-
ernment from imposing controls

World News Roundup

CRAWFORDVILLE VP)-Negroes
march to the Taliaferro County
Courthouse again yesterday and
called a night march after their
spokesman ruled out any halt in
the demonstrations.
"They are trying to talk us into
giving away our freedom, but they
are not going to do it," said
youthful Jimmy Wells of Atlanta,
a staff worker for Southern
Christian Leadership Conference.
SCLC has taken control of the
civil rights drive.
The state police have been the
object of constant taunting at the
rallies, but the troopers stand by
quietly, sometimes smiling at the
barbs.
March to Courthouse
About 95 demonstrators march-
ed to the courthouse, following
the daily attempt by a group of
Negroes to board buses with white
pupils transferred out of the
county when faced with integra-
tion this fall.
The demonstrations started

nearly two weeks ago as a protest
to the bussing of white pupils to
other counties and the shutdown
of the white school here. But
SCLC plans to use a local dis-
pute and a 100-mile march to
Atlanta to dramatize generally the
issue of token school integration.
The demonstrators went to the
jail yesterday and listened to one
of their leaders talk from his cell.
In Atlanta, the SCLC's director
of political education, Hosea Wil-
liams, said at a news conference
there would be no halt. to the
demonstrations in this rural East
Georgia town.
Appeal for Moratorium
Gov. Carl -E. Sanders had ap-
pealed for a moratorium on dem-
onstrations pending court deter-
mination of the county's pupil
placement law. The case is to be
heard Tuesday by a three-judge
federal panel.
Williams said nine demands
would have to be met before any
truce could be called. He said

on them that would bar the way
to eventual rule by the Negro
majority.
If Smith declares independence
from Britain, the Africans feel
their last guarantees will have dis-
appeared. African leaders have
threatened violence if Smith
breaks away.
Wilson, while offering to fi-
nance an education program to
equip the Africans for self govern-
ment, has threatened Rhodesia
with diplomatic ostracism, eco-
nomic boycott and the penalties
of rebellion if it breaks away.
Settle Questions
The British position, backed by
the United States and West Ger-
many among others, is that the
political questions must be settled
before Rhodesia faces the world
on its own.
In a final 21/2-hour session in
the Cabinet room at No. 10 Down-

judicial procedures are too slow
and cumbersome and "too often
have been circumvented by the
likes of rabid segregationists."
"A moratorium would merely
perpetuate the 'bad' status quo, a
status quo which1 is in total dis-
harmony with the aspirations of
the Negro community in Craw-
fordville," said Williams.
Ignore Marchers
Meanwhile, the white residents
of Crawfordville have begun to
ignore the marchers' rallies. For
the past two days, only a few
white spectators have shown up.
The Georgia grand dragon of the
Ku Klux Klan, Calvin F. Craig,
has called for white persons to
pay no attention to the demon-
strations.
In the bus boarding attempt
yesterday, four Negroes were pull-
ed from a street when they sat
down to block a bus. Troopers
grabbed several other Negro pu-
pils who tried to run through
police lines.

By The Associated Press[
WASHINGTON-Administration
leaders declaring the time has
come for the Senate to "put up
or shut up," moved yesterday to
try to choke off a filibuster on the
union shop issue. They slapped
down a cloture petition in time
for a showdown vote Monday after
Republican Leader Everett M.
Dirksen of Illinois pulled the props
out from under their plans for a
preliminary test of sentiment.
iTTnder Senate rules, the roll
will be called at 1 p.m. Monday
on the question of closing debate
on Democratic Leader Mike Mans-
field's motion to call up a bill to
repeal Section. 14B of the Taft-
Hartley Act.
M
JAKART-Young demonstrators
burned the headquarters of the
Indonesian Communist party-
PKI-yesterday and demanded
dissolution of the party, which the
army blames for a leftist uprising
here last week.
"Long live America!" they cried
in a motor parade past the U.S.
Embassy, the scene in recent
months of denunciation of things
American by Red-led Indonesian
mobs.
Soldiers inflamed by the torture
killing of six generals were still
hunting Communist rebel sus-
pects in Jakarta and its suburbs.
The army newspaper Berita Yud-
ha announced the arrest of three
Communist youth front members
and said they confessed taking
part in the killing of the six gen-
erals, who were found buried in a
common grave at an, air base on
Jakarta's outskirts.
MIAMI-Several exile boats ar-
rived yesterday in Cuba to pick
up relatives under Fidel Castro's
new open-door policy and will be
allowed to take them to the Unit-
ed States on Sunday, the Cuban
government announced.
Although Cuban officials did
not say how many boats arrived,
the announcement worried U.S.
officials, who fear prospects of
an unwieldly, small-boat exodus
across the Florida Straits.
* *i *
MOSCOW-Tass insisted yes-
terday that Luna 7 carried out

most of the preliminaries for a
soft landing on the moon before
it crashed into the lunar surface.
Instead Luna 7 crashed early
yesterday in the Ocean of Storms
area, 3 h/daysafter its launching.
It was the third unsuccessful So-
viet attempt in six months to
make history's first soft landing
on the moon.
The braking system apparently
did not function properly.

ing St., Wilson gave Smith an em-
phatic warning on the conse-
quences if he severs the last links
of British control over the self-
governing territory.
The British are especially wor-
ried about the possible reaction of
African populations against whites
elsewhere in Africa. Wilson and
his government believe it would
be one of outrage and they fear
violence.
Nevertheless, the British report-
ed Smith held fast and refused
to agree to the British demand
that Rhodesia recognize that the
black majority eventually will gov-
ern the country.
"We have agreed to differ,"
Smith said.
The
Canterbuzry
H-ouse
opens at 8:30 p.m.
on friday and saturday
at 218 N. Division
BUT:
come early to
insure yourself of:
FREE FOOD
STRANGE HAPPENINGS
Oct. 8, 9
ED REYNOLDS
doing folk
and things like that
-al
others doing others
COME CASUAL
one dollar per person

NOWA~1
ANN CURRENT ANNUAL RATE
FE DERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATIO0N

I

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Keep your eyes
to the shies
at the game!

U.S. SWEEP:
Troops Employ Tear Gas;
Attack Viet Cong Stronghold

-SGC Committee on the University Bookstore

L'

SAIGON (P) - Thousands of
United States paratroopers in-
vaded a Viet Cong jungle strong-
hold yesterday and used tear gas
against the guerrillas, a U.S. mili-
tary spokesman reported.
It was the first authorized use
of nonlethal gas since last Janu-
ary. When news of that operation
leaked out in March it caused
such a world furor that use of tear
gas was discontinued.
In the air war, Guam-based U.S.
B52s struck twice at the Viet
Cong stronghold, 30 miles north
of Saigon in D Zone, before the
U.S. ground drive began.
15,000 Land
At Qui Nhon, 260 miles north-
east of Saigon, advance elements
of a 15,000-man South Korean
combat division began landing.
The paratroopers, some of them

equipped with tear gas grenade
cannisters used the nonlethal gas
at least once yesterday, the
spokesmen said. They were joined
by Australian soldiers.
There were no details on the
gas attack, part of a major op-
eration launched by elements of
the 173rd Airborne Brigade
against the "iron triangle." This
is an area roughly four miles wide
and seven miles long that Com-
munist guerrillas have ruled for
years.
Report Fighting
A U.S. spokesman said the
Americans made significant con-
tact with the enemy and a num-
ber of fights with the Viet Cong
were reported throughout the day.
U.S. casualties were described
as light. A personnel carrier hit
a Viet Cong mine and overturned.

There were no reports of Viet
Cong casualties.
Sequel Sweep
He said the operation was
launched as a sequel to a two-
week sweep in D Zone that ended
Sept. 28.
U.S. forces used the gas three
times previously in field experi-
ments-twice in December and
once in January-in an effort to
flush out the Viet Cong without
injury to noncombatants or U.S.
prisoners.
But as a result of a world out-
cry last March when these inci-
dents were disclosed, it was stated
that while Gen. William C. West-
moreland, commander of U.S.
forces, had authority to order use
of the tear gas, it would be against
U.S. policy to do so in field op-
erations in Viet Nam.
.1

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