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October 07, 1965 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-07

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PAGE TWO

TUE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7,1965

PAGE TWO TUE MICHIGAN DAILY ThURSDAY, OCTOBER 7.1965

APA PERFORMANCE:
Ibsen's Cutting Edge Knicked
In Premiere of 'Wild Ducki'.

Outside the Classroom this Week

The Association of Producing
Artists made clear again last night
their able versatility as a reper-
tory company. Last week it was
conscious high camp, as they bub-
bled through "You Can't Take It
With You." And now they're off
in another direction, as they
plumb the "vasty deep" of sym-
bolic realism, in Henrik Ibsen's
"The Wild Duck." It all amounts
to a tolerably competent double
reverse.
The Wild Duck hasn't had a
major American revival in forty
years, I'm told, and even the ven-
ture is to Robert Schnitzer's credit.
He was reminded frequently last
night that it's a risky business, as
the Mendelssohn Theatre crowd
responded in mixed and sporadic
HOMECOM ING
A New Tradition!!
FRIDAY, OCT.15
3:30-5:00 P.M.
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reactions to a very serious piece
of dramatic stuff.
This is a difficult show to re-
vive, especially for an audience
bred on some of the APA's more
obviously successful pieces. Ibsen,
live and in color, isn't Ibsen in
the study. The Wild Duck is a fine
example. It's Ibsen's grim and
cutting treatment of the fact
that most men live by illusion--
that self-deception is a necessary
ingredient for an otherwise naked
man's survival.
But to act this thesis through
for us, Ibsen must often watch his
prose before his drama.
It never got truly wooden, or
dull. indeed, with Betty Miller
and Jennifer Harmon in the cast,
it couldn't have. These talented
ladies, as Hjalmar Ekdal's wife
and daughter, were easily deserv-

ing of unqualified praise in poig-
nant, understated roles. Richard
Woods, cast in his second stern
and righteous role in as many
weeks, and Joseph Bird, in his role
as choric doctor Relling, are ex-
cellent, together with Sydney
Walker in another fine support-
ing job.
Whatever trouble there is lies
with the principal roles. Donald
Moffatt never quite completely
manages Ibsen's sorry hero. Per-
haps it's his occasionally distress-
ing tendency to revert to Moffatt
from time to time; Hjalmar Ekdal
is accordingly too often merely a
fatheaded burlesque, instead of a
pitiably tragic figure.
The Ibsen cutting edge is there,
but nicked and dulled a bit. For
the APA, however, it's more than
just a good try.
--John J. Manning, Jr.

ORPHANS OF THE STORM':
Technical Masterpiece:
A, Rage Without Cause

By VICKI LASSAR
and DALE GOLD
HIGHLIGHTS
! Art
Thursday and Friday, October
7 and 8, the public will be able
to view the Student Art Fair on
the Diag. Entries to this contestI
have been submitted through the
University Activities Center and
will be judged in lieu of cash prizes
by faculty judges. Students are in-
vited to come and "browse."
* * *
Music
The first concert of the Choral
Union Series will be given at 8:30
p.m., October 9. As part of their
travelling series, the Chicago Sym-
phony Orchestra, directed by Jean
Martinon, will appear for the
opening concert. The program, in-
augurating the University Musical
Society's 87th season, will include
works of Bach. Debussy and Ravel
and will feature John Browning,
renowned American pianist, play
ing the "Piano Concerto" by Bar-
ber.
IN TOWN
Art
Forsythe Gallery, 201 Nicgels Ar-
cade-Sculpture and painting ab-
stracts in metal and wood by Nar-
enda M. Patel. (Weekdays, 10-4;
Saturday, 10-1; through Oct. 14.)
Diag-Student Art air. (Oct. 7
and 8; free.)
Architecture and Design Audi-
torium-"No Time for Ugliness,"
a film appraisal of the American
city by the American Institute of
Architecture. (3 p.m., Oct. 13.)
. * *
Cinema
Cinema Guild, Architecture and
Design Auditorium-"Orphans of
the Storm," D. W. Griffith's silent
classic, with the Gish sisters. (7
and 9:45 p.m., Oct. 7, 8.)
"Mon Oncle," the most famous
French comedy with Jaques Tati.
(7 and 9 p.m., Oct. 9, 10.)
Campus Theatre, South Univer-
sity-"The Pawnbroker," with Rod
Steiger and Geraldine Page. (7 and
9 p.m., Oct. 7-13.)
Michigan Theatre, East Liberty
-"Ship of Fools," with Simone

conductor, Ralph Herbert, bari-
tone. Featuring works of Strav-
insky, Mahler, and Beethoven.
(8:30 p.m., Oct. 8.)
Choral Union Series, Chicago
Symphony Orcestra, Jean Martin-
on, conductor, John Browning,
pianist. The program includes
Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No.
6 . . . Barber: Piano Concerto . .
Debussy: L'Apres-midi d'une faune
. Ravel: La Valse. (8:30 p.m.,
Oct. 9, reserved seats.)
. Rackham Lecture Hall - "As-
pects of Electronic Music," inaug-
urating U. of M. electronic music
studio.
Chamber Ensemble, Thomas Hil-
bish, conductor. (8:30 p.m., Oct.
10.)
"The Production and Perception
of Electronic Music," given by lec-
turer-composer, Milton Babbit.
(4:15 p.m., Oct. 11.)
Chamber Ensemble, Thomas Hil-
bish, conductor, Ethel Casey, guest
soprano. (8:30 p.m., Oct. 11.)
The Baroque Trio, flute, oboe,
harpsichord and double bass. (8:30
p.m., Oct. 12.)
Rackham String Trio, violin,
viola and cello, featuring works
of Beethoven, Absil, and Mozart.
(8:30 p.m., Oct. 13.)
Radio
WUOM-FM-91.7 mc. Ann Ar-
bor.'
Sibelius Centennial-The first
in a series of 13 programs com-

Signoret and Lee Marvin. (1, 3:30,
6:20; and 9 p.m., Oct. 8-19.)
State Theatre, State Street -
"Secret of My Success," with Shir-
ley Jones. (through Oct. 8.)
"Rage to Live," with Suzanne
Pleshett and Bradford Dilman. (1,
3, 5, 7, and 9 p.m., Oct. 9-13.)
Music
Hill Auditorium - University
Chamber Orchestra, Joseph Blatt,

memorating the centennial of the George
birth of Finnish composer Jean Hart.
Sibelius. This program includes Sunday
an interview with Orien Dalley, p.m., C
a former student of Sibelius. seats.)
Works being presented are Fin-
landia, Op. 26 and Symphony No.
1 in E minor, Op. 39. (7:30 p.m.,,
Oct. 7.) "Art
Football-U. of M. vs. 'MSU. its pree
(1:15 p.m., Oct. 9.) this ex
New York Philharmonic-Sibel- tour of
ius: Symphony No. 3 in C major, includes
Op. 105 ... Chavez: Violin Concer- hung co
to, Henryk Szeryng, violinist, resenta
Saint-Saens: Symphony No. 3 in lectedt
C minor, Leonard Bernstein con- seum o
ducting. (2 p.m., Oct. 10.) (Oct. 9
Live recordings of the Univer- Stron
sity Musical concerts will be heard Michiga
at 8:30 p.m., Oct. 8, 12, and 13. Philoso
* * of the
Speakers Greece,
Wesley Foundation, State and E. er in t
Huron across from Frieze-Poetry and S
readings by Tony Stoneburner and (7:30, p
James Torrens, S.J., sponsored by
Generation magazine. (8:30 p.m.,;
Oct. 8.) Detrc
Woodw
Television Garden
"Citizen Kane," recent Cinema as an.
Guild presentation of Orson Well- Dietrich
es' screenplay. (Channel 13, 11:35 exhibit
p.m., Oct. 11.) David C
Tuesday Nights at the Movies- 12.)
"Funny Face," starring Audrey
Hepburn and Fred Astaire. (Chan-
nel 4, 9 p.m., Oct. 12.) Detr
* * Ford A
Theatre son Av
Professional Theatre Program ture to
presents APA - "Wild Duck," Symph
poignant dramatic classic by Hen- 90 . .
rik Ibsen. (8 p.m., Oct. 7, 8, and No, 3i
13; reserved seats.) Orches
"You Can't Take It with You," and Fu
the funniest American comedy by ge Bole

S. Ka
(Matine
y, 2:30
Oct. 9
OUTC
Across
miiere ope
xhibit be
major
s 50 pa
onstructi
tional, a
by Peter
f Mode
-31.) )
ng Aud
an Univ
phy and
series "T
" Marily
he Depa
ocial S

p.m., Oct. 7. 50c.)
* * *
Cinema
oit Institute of Arts, 5200
ard Ave., Detroit - "The
of Allah, part of the Film
Art program,'this Marlene
h film will be presented to
early filming in color by
0. Selznick. (8:05 p.m., Oct.
** *
Music
oit Symphony Orchestra,
auditorium, 20 East Jeffer-
e., Detroit-Nielsen: Over-
"Masquerade." ... Brahns:
ony No. 3 in M major, Op.
Rachmaninoff: Concerto
in D minor for Piano and
tra . . . Weinberger: Polka
gue from "Schwando," Jor-
et, pianist. (8:30 p.m., Oct.

ufman and Moss 7 and 9: reserved seats)
es Saturday and *
p.m.; evenings 8 Theatre
and 10; reserved Detroit Institute of Arts, 5200
Woodward Ave., Detroit-"Harry.
the Rat," a play by Jules Feiffer,
OF TOWN! will be given in Kresge Court.
Art (8:30 p.m., Oct. 13-15, $1.50.)
America,' following Bonstelle Theatre, 3424 Wood-
ening in New York, ward Aye, Detroit-"Three Penny
egins its two-year Opera," a fully developed Epic
U.S. museums. It Theatre piece will be presented by
iintings and wall- Wayne State University Players.
ons of pop, op, rep- The play, by Bertolt Brecht, is the
nd abstract art se- free adaptation of Gay's "The Beg-
r Selz of the Mu- gar's Opera." (8:30 p.m., Oct. 8,
rn Art, New York. 9, 14-16.)
Fisher Theatre, 2nd and W.
ditorium, Eastern Grand Blvd., Detroit-"Skyscrap-
versity - "Greek er," based on Emma Rice's "Dream
Thought," as part Girl," with Julie Harris and Vic-
'he Glory that Was tor Spinetti. (Nightly, 8:30 p.m.,
yn Pearsall, lectur- maintees Wed. and Sat. through
artment of History Oct. 14; reserved seats.)
tudies will speak,

By PAUL SAWYER

At The Cinema Guild
"Orphans of the Storm" was
made nearly forty-five years ago
at a time when D. W. Griffith
was well into his decline. Thus
it is all the more amazing that
even though it clings to conven-
tions that today, in the midst of
the tight-lipped suavity and sad-
ism-as-a-way-of-life of the James
Bond Age, are strictly pass6, this
film still contains the excitement
and power that it does. In fact,
throughout two and three-quarter
hours of constant movement and
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endlessly rising and falling action,
there is scarcely a dull moment.
The orphans are a French peas-
ant girl and her blind adopted
sister, an abandoned child with
aristocratic blood (played by the
beautiful. but indistinguishable
Gish sisters), and the storm is
the French Revolution. Griffith
thus makes use of a balanced ten-
sion between a simple personal
narrative and the chronicle of an
historical upheaval, which he used
so well in both "Birth of a Na-
tion" and "Intolerance." He then
weaves together several dramatic
strands into an elaborate textile
which is climaxed by the Revolu-
tion itself and the famous rescue
of Lillian Gish from the guillotine.
When one considers the fact
that just a few years before, Grif-
fith was just experimenting with
the modern film's most basic tools,
such as the close-up or the tech-
nique of cutting from person to
person within a single scene, one
is struck with the enormity of this
work. The rapid cutting of the
climactic rescue scene and the
skillful juxtaposition of extreme
close-ups with long-shots of great
crowds has not been significantly
improved upon since then.
But unlike Griffith's better
films, "Orphans of the Storm" is
nothing more than a spectacle.
Infantile titles condemn Robes-
pierre for instituting "Anarchy
and Bolshevism"; there is no psy-
chological subtlety, all the char-
acters being completely noble or
blackest of the black; and the
historical accuracy makes King
Arthur read like a textbook of
Eniglish constitutional history.
Griffith's films by this time, more-
over, were all copies of innova-
tions made in earlier work. It is a
pity that these films, with all their
fierce power and technical bril-
liance, did not always have some-
thing important to rage about.

MICHIGRM

STARTS
FRIDAY

"AN EVENT! FASCINATING!
MASTERFUL
"TIME
"HAS EVERYTHING!"

U

I

Jf fi '
/
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Hey fellas-
Tickets for the Home-
coming Friday might
Dance with the Four
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Friday morning at 9:0
on the Diag and at the.
Union ...125 each.
There are only 3000
available - I wouldn't
wait long if I were you.
By the way, you can
only buy four each.
S2 )
HOMECOMING
FRIDAY NIGHT DANCE
OCT. 15,0-1
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COLUMBIA PICTURES Pre:ents A STANLEY KRAMER PRODUCTION
A Film Based on KATHERINE ANNE PORTER'S "SKIP OF FOOLS"

*

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CHOICE SEATS FOR
SATURDAY MATINEES

1i

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Bob Dylani

I PTP

THE
WILD DUCK
by
HENRIK IBSEN
Anew version
of the poignant drama
Directed by
Stephen Porter
Set Designer: James Tilton
Costume Designer: NanCy Potts

YOU CAN'T
TAKE IT
WITH YOU
by
GEORGE S. KAUFMAN
and MOSS HART
The classic

i
7

HOMECOMING
PADDLE!
(available in
limited numbers)
On sale:
DIAG
FISHBOWL
Oct. 7-8, 11-15

The word-of-mouth has startd... M l UE

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DIAL 662-6264
ENDS FRIDAY

I

11

MASONIC TEMPLE, DETROIT
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24th
7:30 P.M.
Tickets: $1.50 2.50, 3.50, 4.50
On Sale: Grinnell's, 1515 Wood-
ward Ave.; Marwil's Books, North-
land, Music World, 4861 Wood-
ward Ave.
For mail orders, enclise stamped,
self-addressed envelope.

how TNRee
2eauTFUL GIRLS LoVe
FOR Frn- aD itMluDer
d for PROFiTI

THE MOST
TALKED ABOUT
\PICTURE!

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9 ANA.-4P.M.

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American comedy!
Directed by
Ellis Rabb
et Designer: James Tilto ,
Costume Designer: Nancy Potts

I

Oct. 6,7,8

Oct. 9,10

# #
# I
S/Tonight at l and 9:45 P.M.II
# #
# #
1 1
# 1
# D. W. GRIFFITH'S
# 1
1 #
# Orphans of i
# 1
I Te Storm :!
# #
1 1

STE~LA ~ SMHKIOWCMAN
JMESBOO-JONELJERES
,.m ..METROCOLOR
SATURDAY
IT DARES TO PROBE
A WOMAN'S INTIMATE DESIRE!

- A

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