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September 24, 1965 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-09-24

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1965

PAETO__ IhIA AL RDY SPEBR~,16

'Darling', Brilliant New British Import,
Conveys Youths' Malaise and Frustration

By HUGHHOLLAND,
At The MichiganTheatre
"Darlig": one' of those films,,
all tqp rie, t at:pduce an im-
medi te rfay6 abl'esporise and
demarid,- e-viwing. It is, like
most cuet * rt i isl' ,cinema, an
exciting film both'in th-me 'and
composition.
"Darling der'ives its title from
the endearment placed upon a
beautiful and ambitious'young girl,
who moves restlily-frin job to
job, society.o. society; bed.to bed.
The.camef~a follows her life for a
short Period, using as a focal-point
the -p'nolonged relationship be-
tweei'the girl:(Julie Christie).and
a T.V. scriptwriter'and announcer
(DirkBogard)).
Thematically the film draws
immediate comparison with Fel-
lini's "I Dolce Vita." The direc-

tor, John Schlessinger, attempts
to capture the same "malaise," the
same frustration, the same vague
discontent that Fellinf, found :ac-
tive among a great segment of
the young adult generation. "Dar-
ling" examines the English variety.
Search for Meaning
Miss Christie plays a model and
sometimes-actress who continual-
ly searches her life and the life:
about her for some peace, some
sense of meaning. The film fol-
lows her in hectic activity, both
dramatically and technically. .
Howvevc, "Darling" is more
than a social comment on Schle-
singer's part. There is more affin-
ity in this film to Pellini's "City
Iights" than to "La Dolce Vita,"
for "Dailing" is about a human
being; a human being faced with
an unusual amount of energy and.
thrus into an inhuman world
where cameras and taxis, planes

and projectors insert themselves
and dom-nate.
If anything, "Darling" should
be compared to "A Woman Is a
Woman:" by Jean Luc Godard.
Both the theme (that of a woman
striving to re-crient her natural
feminine desires and instinct to
a sexless, neuter world), and the
technical facilities used have much
in common..
Innate Sense
Like Godard, Schlesinger has an
innate sense of the way a film
should be made. He is as willing
and competent as Godard to vio-
late the traditicnal structural pat-
terns of filmaking and create his
own. Consequently, soundtracks
precede scenes and serve as a
means of continuity as well as
contrast.
Scenes follow each other in
rapid succession with little obvious
connection to the narration, or to
each other, providing a series of
reactions as well as presenting the
passage, of time.
And, like both Godard and ,Fel-
lin , Schlesinger joins that gifted

minority of first-rate directors
possessed with a sense of taste
and restraint.
Further, the camera work and
editing are brilliant, both preci-
sion and consiseness dominating.
Excitement
A great deal of the excitement
which "Darling" generates is dae
to the'choice of Julie Christie for
the title role. Miss Christie man-
ages to convey all the variety of
experiences and emotions that the
role demands without ever seem-
ing inconsistent or false. Her con-
trol is amazing and her presence
is powerful and alive.
Both the supporting actors, Dirk
Bogard and Laurence Harvey are
excellent. Under the careful di-
rection of Schlesinger they seem
to have given their finest perfor-
mances ,to date.,
Again and again one is forced
to return to John Schlesinger, the
director for the final credit. His
control, his daring, his scope, his
bility, his frugality and his gen-
ius have made "Darling" one of
the finest films of the year.

Editor Tells
About Life
At the Daily
(Continued from Page 1)
and traditions of both the news-
paper and the institution, that
give The Daily its unique and
hard-won prominence in Univer-
sity affairs.
One of my less favorite phrases,
heard frequently in connection
with the recent departure of Roger
Heyns, is "The institution has a
life of its own." This isn't true of
The Daily, and God forbid it
should ever become true of the
University. The Daily is what its
staff is and does, and how they
interact with themselves; the Uni-
versity and the world. We're here
to create our own individual and
collective lives, not fit them into
'pre-cut pigeon-holes.
We can only hope that what we
do, as a newspaper and as part
of the University, is of some rele-
vance to all of that nebulous
30,000 people known as our read-
ership. And if you don't think we
are, come join the staff, or write
us a letter or article (guest writers
are welcome), and see for yourself.
I Congratulations are in order for
the legion accomplishments of 75
generations of Daily staff. En-
couragement is in order for the
upcoming 74-that they should do
as well. And, for the time being,
this group of Seniors, in what
little time they have remaining,
will go about its business, raising
hell whenever and wherever it can,

FRIDAYSEPT. 24
9 a.m.-Registration meeting of
the University Press Club of
Michigan at, the Michigan Union.
12 noon-Carl Oglesby, Presi-
dent of Students for a Democratic
Society, will be the featured
speaker at a Viet Nam rally on the
Diag.
12 noon-Prof. Marvin Felheim
will speak on the "Unresolved Is-
sues in the University" at a Guild
House luncheon, 802 Monroe.
4:10 p.m.-Dr. Donald W. Smith
of the University of Wisconsin
will speak on the Characterization
of mycobacteria in Room 1528 of
the East Medical Building.
4:15 p.m. - Prof. M. Richard
Shaull of Princeton Theological
Seminary will speak on "Agents
of Change in Latin American So-
ciety" in the Multi-purpose Room
of the Undergraduate Library.
4:15 p.m.-Dr. James P. Egan
of Indiana University will speak
on "Signal Detection and Binaural
Hearing Processes" in Angell Hall
Aud. B.
7 and 9 p.m. - The Cinema
Guild will present "Citizen Kane"
in the Architecture Aud.
7:30 p.m.-Daniel Anakaa, a
Nigerian chieftan studying at Cal-
vin College will speak on American
Race Relations as viewed by an
African in the Multi-purpose

Room of, the UndergraduateI-
brary.
8 p.m.-The University Literary
Magazine will sponsor a Genera-
tion Seminaa with Tony Stone-
burner, poet and PhD candidate,
in-Room 3C of the Union.
8:00 p.m.-Prof. M. Richard
Shauli of Princeton Theological
Seminary will address the Inter-
national Dinner at the First Bap-
tist Church.
8:00 p.m.-Father Bernard J.
Cook of Marquette University will
speak on "The Church's Coming
Dialogue with the Modern World"
in Angell Hall Aud. A.
8:30 p.m.-U of M Folklore So-
ciety will present a Diag Sing.
SATURDAY, SEPT.25
9:30 a.m.-Michigan Daily ani-
niversary celebration at the Mich-
igan Union.
Ui

Across Campus

the
can erburY
house
"will be available
for listening
(nid like that
oi friday and
saturday night
stop by
one do lar per person
no Charge
for
food and drink
)o Charge
for having your
mint blown
sets on the hour
otherwise-
who knows

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SINGLE TICKETS NOWI

U Professioal Theatre Program - lff1U EN I

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YOU CAN'T
TAKE IT
WITH YOU
by
GWORGE S. KAUFMAN
and MOSS HART
The classic
American comedy!
Directed by
Ellis Rabb
Set Designer: James Tilton
Costume Designer: Nancy Potts

THE
WILDDUCK
by
HENRIK IBSEN
A new version
of the poignant drama
Directed by
Stephen Porter
Set Designer: James Tilton
costume Designer; Nancy Potts

HERAKLES
by ARCHIBALD MAC 11131
The Pulitzer Prize
playwright's provocative
new play

Directed bY
Alan Schneider
Set Designer: James Tiltol
costume Designer Nancy Potts
KRAI'S LAST TAPE
by SAMUEL BECKETT
Fasrinating theatre
o/ the absurd'

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