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September 22, 1965 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-09-22

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAllV

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:DNE DJAY, SEP!TEMBER 22, 1965

3

Shutdown of Dailies Brings
Strange Quiet to New York

REPLIES TO CRITICS:
Sargent Shriver Much in Demand
For Establishing New Agencies

OPENING THIS WEEK .
Ann Arbor Civic Theatre's
Presentation of
NEVER TOO LATE
TRUEBLOOD AUDITORIUM
THURSDAY, Sept. 23-SATURDAY, Sept. 25

r'

By GEORGE W. CORNELL
NEW YORK (W)-The situation
had a strange muffling effect to
many, as if the clamor of life
had suddenly subsided, the pace
slowed and the dimensions shrunk
to neighborhood size..
"I feel lost," an executive said,
"completely out of touch."
Such were reactions to the clos
ing of most newspaper outlets
here, as if the local scene had
become oddly muted and insulat-
ed, without the stir of events-at-
large.

"It's sort of peaceful," a young
secretary said. "I know it's not
real, and that all'the fuss and
happenings in the world are still
going on, but without seeing the
papers, it doesn't seem like it."
Newsstands were mostly bare
of headlines, as crowds shuffled
to work for the day. Seven of the
city's eight major dailies were
shut down because of a strike
against one of them, the New
York Times.
One afternoon daily, the New
York Post. still was publishing.

r .1

TODAY
"A NEW CHINA POLICY"
George A. White
12:00 Noon-Michigan League, Rm. 2
(4th of the weekly Wednesday noon luncheon
book discussions sponsored by The University
of Michigan Office of Religious Affairs.),
ALL STUDENTS, FACULTY, STAFF WELCOME

Next Wed., Sept. 29:

The New Reformation
speaker: Mr; DaVid L.

The atmosphere-on the sub-
ways, in the hotel lobbies, on park
benches-was of something lack-
ing, a missing link with everyday
routine, a vague sense of being
cut off from things.
It also upset special sectors of
society, the stock market investor
trying to learn the day's quota-
tions, the horse player anxious
about track results.
In this communications citadel,
with its endless flow of news
columns press agentry, celebrity
stunts, cultural promotions -and
advertising, it's simply not normal
to get no word of doings of the
moment.
To try to fill the void, broad-
casters have greatly expanded
their news programs. WNBC-TV
devoted an hour Sunday to "The
New York Times" featuring top
staff members reading their
stories and columns.
"You had to listen to the fash-
ion and women's news and other
stuff I don't read to get the rest
of it," a suburbanite said. "I kept
the set on all morning before I
got any news."
Radio station WINS even aired
summaries of the Sunday comic
strips.
But to many working men, and
the more industrious housewives,
the day's schedule leaves scant
chance for sitting down to radio
or television until nightfall, and
they ordinarily catch the day's
news on the run.
That meanswhile riding the
train, at the lunchcounter, or in
slack time at theeoffice desk or
store, where it's easy to have a
newspaper at hand but not elec-
tronic equipment.
And the absence of that ready
news fare left an unfamiliar gap
in the population's preoccupations.
Eyes of subway riders wandered
uncertainly, bereft of their usual
refuge in the morning newsprint.
Finding themselves staring at
someone across the aisle, people
would look uncomfortably. to the
ceiling, to panel posters, or down
At their feet.
Others found substitute absorp-
tion in books or magazines. You
could spot even some dignified
elders pursuing comic books and
"authentic" romances, grabbed.
from the denuded newsstands.
To help keep newsstand dealers
in business, the city license com-
missioner issued emergency au-
thorization for them to sell razor
blades, shoe laces, tobacco and
other small items if the shutdown
continued beyond Thursday noon.
There also were moves by some
out-of-town newspapers to help
fill the news gap. A trickle of
bundled papers was beginning to
reach a few city points from, out-
lying communities.
But New York, which ordinarily
devours more than 4 million news-
papers a day, still seems oddly
silent without the thunder of its
mighty press runs and the tidings
of the times they speak.

By W. B. RAGSDALE JR.

WASHINGTON (R)-When you
need a man to help create a new
government agency, says Sargent
Shriver, you should get a man
who already has a job he doesn't
want to leave.'
You get the man excited about
the new program, bring him to
Washington, work him 12 to 16
hours a day in a crisis atmosphere,
then, after a year or so, let him
go back, to the easier pace of pri-
vate business or a college campus.
"With this kind of people, we
don't need to worry about themC
trying to tell us what we want to
hear," Shriver says. "We find out
right; awayi when something is
wrong. They'd quit tomorrow if
they, thought we were going to
stay wrong."
But that approach does make
-1 T
Viet Rall
a-
At er keley
Berkeley, Calif., Sept. 21-UPI-
The opening day of the fall term
at the Berkeley campus bf the
University of California produced
a noon rally and some picketing.
It appeared that U.S. policy to-
ward Viet Nam has replhced the
school administration as a stu-
dent target.
About 300 persons gathered yes-
terday on thersteps of Sproul
Hall, the university's administra-
tion building, to hear spokesmen
for the Viet Nam Day Committee
urge the U.S. to pull out of South-
east Asia.'
The Committee promised a mass
demonstration Oct. 16 both on
campus and at the Oakland Army
terminal, embarkation point for
Viet Nam-bound troops.
The fall semester of 1964 at
Berkeley produced wild demon-
strations and tumultuous noon ral-
lies by students seeking increased
political rights on campus. Their
activities were climaxed by a. sit-
in at Sproul Hall last Dec. 2-3 in
which 773 demonstrators were ar-
rested.
The leaders have drawn stiff
jail terms and fines for their ac-
tion and nearly every participant
has paid a fine. But the admin-
istration since has liberalized
campus rules to permit students
almost unlimited free speech and
to provide procedures for airing
student grievances.,

for a heavy personnel turnover at
the Office of Economic Opportun-
ity, where Shriver directs Presi-
dent Johnson's antipoverty cam-
paign, just as it did in the Peace
Corps which he organized and
still heads.
Six senior officials either have
left in recent days or soon will'
leave. At lower levels, there is a
steady change as people go back
to their regular jobs.
Congressional and other critics
say this turnover is a sign of poor
organization, inefficiency, bad
morale.
"We had 150 per cent turnover
in the first two years of the
Peace Corps," saystShriver. "I'd
rather have the best man avail-
able for the job for a year or so
than a less qualified person per-
manently."
He notes that the Peace Corps,
in its early days, also had its
critics who said it was a flop.
Although there is a strong
measure of idealism in the pro-
grams he administers, Shriver is
a tough realist who wants results,
not moral victories.
When questioned recently about
a political power struggle center-
ing around the antipoverty pro-
gram in New York, he replied:
"That's life. You can't run the
program in a vacuum. You must
deal with the realities as they
are."
Staff conferences are a bit like
battlefields, insiders say.
One veteran Shriver aide com-
ments: "Shriver delights when the
staff is at each 'other, people
shouting at each other. He feels
it is a good test of a man under
pressure. You get at the real is-
sues, find out how they really
feel.
"He often pits one staff mem-
ber against another to bring into
the open c6nflicting viewpoints."
Some people are driven away by
the crisis atmosphere, the tension
and Shriver's supersalesman ap-
proach, but most who work with
him wind up as staunch admirers.
One, who was a skeptic at first,
comments:
"He is a master at drawing
the best out of a staff and has
high standards. Shriver is quick
to criticize, sparing with praise.
I've never seen anybody, any-
where, who could rouse so much
enthusiasm for a job." ,
Nobody is hired at either agency
for any responsible job without
Shriver's okay. He often helps
recruit the new. employes. His
first assignment in government,

was as a talent scout in the for-
mation of the administration of
the late President John F. Ken-
nedy.
Subordinates often find Shriver
may know some details of their
jobs better than they do.
"He does his homework," says
Mary Ann Orlando, Shriver's ad-
ministrative aide who has been
with him since 1948.
He gets up about 6 a.m. During
the school year, Shriver spends
the early morning hours with his
wife, the former Eunice Kennedy,
sister of the late president, and
their four children.
The work dayabegins when he
steps into his car for the drive
in from his home in nearby Mary-
land. "I get a good 40 minutes
work done in the car," 'Shriver
says. The day sometimes ends at
midnight or later.
Three days a week, Shriver goes
to the office of Economic Oppor-
tunity. The other two he is at the
Peace Corps. Miss O r l a n d o
switches with him. Otherwise,
there are separate staffs.
Normally, a staff conference is
held at 9:30 a.m. After that, there
is a procession of appointments,
meetings, paper work, telephone
calls and trips to Capitol Hill.
Stories saying that Shriver is
smiling all the time are just not
true, Miss Orlando say. "Of course
he doesn't smile all the time.
Anybody who does is an idiot. He
gets tired and irritable just like
anyone else."
Shriver, says Miss Orlando, al-
ways has "thrown himself into
everything. In the past, however,
there were always periods when
he could relax a bit and' recuper-
ate.

Read The Daily
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Call 663-6470,764-5487

Shows at 1:00-2:45
4:45-7:00 and 9:10

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WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 22
'Noon-The Office of Religious
Affairs will present a Luncheon
Book Discussion, the speaker will
be George A. White who will speak
on "A New China Policy."
7:30 p.m. - The organization
meeting of the American Institute
of Aeronautics and Astronautics
will be held in the Colloquium
Room of the Physics and Astron-
omy Bldg. Plans for coming lec-j

,,nce Room of. Rackham.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 23
8:30 a.m.-L. Clayton Hill. Pro-
fessor Emeritus of the Graduate
School of Business Administration
will speak .on "The Basics of Su-
pervision" in Room 5046 of the
Kresge Hearing Research Insti-
tute.
9:30 aim.-The Conference on
Cellular Plastics will continue its
sessions in the Rackham Building.
7 and 9 p.m. - The Cinema
Guild will present "Citizen Kane"
in the Architecture Aud.
HOM E C M IN G

When she 'was good . she was very, very goad
and when she was bad she was DARLI NGI
"A MOVIE THAT YOU SHOULD
NOT IV" Iiss!.-JUDITHCRST-on NBC-TV "TODAY" show
"EVERYTHING YOU HOPE
FOR 13UT RARELY FIND IN A FILM! }k}.
-New York Herald Tribune
*DEVASTATING I. }:
BLISTERINGI
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'IRRESISTIBLEI'
-Time Magazine
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ProoUCeD eB JOsePh anni -oirecrmea yJ 0hn scmesinGer -screePyla y Fre0eric ramPaeL
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Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9:10 P.M.
'65 PRESENTS "TWO TIMES TWO"...

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