100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 21, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-09-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1985

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rAGF, THnEE

Exiles Predict Cuban Military to Overthrow

Castro

By The Associated Press in characteristic Castro fashion
WASHINGTON Many Cuban he insists they have been stamped
WASHNGTO - Mny Cbanout.
exiles who once dreame! of top- Another problem to which he re-
pling Fidel Castro by ii. ailing Anteprbmtowiher-
thing hoelaCnso say i ing a fers obliquely at times is that of
their homeland now say it is Cas- the loyalty of his army and mili-
to own ilitry that will turn tary forces. Experts here say dis-
There seems to be a new feeling satisfaction has increased enor-
of hope among Cuban exiles in mously within these forces in re-
ofhpegaong Cban Nexe Yi cent months with the spread of
Washington, Miami, New York discontent among Cubans at their
"Algo se esta cocinando enplight under Communist masters.
Cuba," they say - Something is Castro Controls
cooking in Cuba. Castro still controls Cuba. His
Hailed military forces and sophisticated
Castro was hailed as a conquer- weapons are the most powerful in
ing hero when his revolution swept all Latin America. The great hope
him into power in January 1959, of the exiles is that this power
but now grumbling is audible at will be turned on the Castro gov-
times when he makes his three- ernment.
hour speeches. Some exiles insist there have
He mentions with increasing been at least three attempts in re-
frequency and bitterness the prob- cent months to assassinate Castro.
lem of guerrillas inside Cuba. And United States officials say they

have nothing to confirm such re-
ports.
Exiles and U.S. officials often
have disagreed about some aspects
of the situation inside Cuba. Cub-
an refugees concede they may be
influenced at times by wishful
thinking, but say U.S. intelligence
in Cuba has been deficient at
times, as in the missile crisis
of 1962.
Agree
But there are a number of
things on which U.S. experts and
the Cuban exiles do agree:
-Cuba's economy and interna-
tional finance is in chaos.
-Castro's theory that below-
cost prices for Cuba's bumper su-
gar crop will be offset by profits
in other production is nonsense.
Army

ti-Castro forces. There have been
numerous purges and arrests of
military men, and weapons have
been taken away from various
units.
-Hatred for the Communist re-
gime is spreading among the pop-
ulace.
Firing
-Imprisonment, firing squad
executions, and other measures
aimed at stamping out dissenters
are producing additional defec-
tions throughout all elements of
the population.
-Grumbling against rationing,
shortages and repressive measures
is widespread. One report says
that when Castro told people in
the vicinity of Nuevitas, a key port
city on Cuba's north coast, that
things were now better, the crowd

ers. The next day army men mov- of Trinidad; and four areas in
ed into the town, confiscated doz- Cuba's easternmost province of
ens of businesses and dragged off Oriente-a swampy area near Ma-
dozens to prisons. nati, and mountain areas south-
Despite Castro's claims, it is , west of Manzanillo, northwest and

prudent to assume he has not
eliminated all anti-government
guerrillas groups. These are not
large in numbers, their activities
are restricted by feal of repres-
sive measures, but they operate
all over Cuba.
Guerrillas
Exiles say guerrilla forces are
operating now in at least seven
areas of Cuba, and that the Cas-
tro government knows they are
there.
The areas they list are in the
mountains are San Diego de los
Banos, in Pin del Rio Province,
the swampy peninsula of Zapa-
ta, near Matanzas; the mountains
of Las Villas Province, just north

northeast of Guantanamo.

As if all these problems were
not enough, the Cuban economy
is in chaos and its international
finances in crisis. Even a bumper,
sugar crop is not expected to help
Castro because of the collapse of
prices on the world market due to
enormous overproduction in many
other areas.
And Castro, an unruly figure in
the Communist world, is caught
up in the struggle between Mos-
cow-which props up Cuba's se-
curity, economy and military
might at an estimated cost of a
million dollars a day-and Peking,
whose more belligerent ideology
Castro prefers.

There have been increasing
signs that Nikita Khrushchev's
successors in the Kremlin, with
problems of their own, are impa-
tient with the loquacious and un-
predictable fellow in Havana.
But with all of these problems,
there still exists a big question
in the minds of those who would
like to see Castro toppled from
power.
It is just how, when and wheth-
er the forces working against
Castro will mesh into a coordi-
nated internal struggle to rid
Cuba of its Communist control.
So far, there have been no signs
of coordination in guerrilla acti-
vities, in strategic sabotage, or in
plans for any general uprising
against the Havana regime.
U.S. experts say this is under-
standable under the harsh and
extraordinarily tight antisubver-

sion measures in force in Cuba
today. They add that bitterness
at such measures, coupled with
growing hatred of Cubans of the
Communist regime, could well up
into national revolt at any time.
U.S. policy remains the same:
Economic, moral and diplomatic
pressure on Cuba, but no permis-
sion for exiles to launch their
raids from U.S. soil.
Sen. Thomas J. Dodd (D-Conn),
long a close observer of Cuban
affairs, says "There is today in
Cuba a state of disenchantment
and open rebellion against the
Castro regime that bears a strik-
ing similarity to the situation that
existed in Hungary before the
great popular revolution of Oc-
tober 1956." Dodd says the Unit-
ed States "must embark on a
crash program to help Cuban peo-
ple liberate themselves."

-The Cuban army and the mi- chorused denials so vehemently
litia are heavily infiltrated by an- they drowned out the loudspeak-

---- i

Coal
Over

Miners
Job Fi:

Call

Strike

World News Roundup

55:2

ring

Dispute
'10,700 Walk
Out in Tri.
State Fields
Union and Companies
Appeal to Members
To Return To Work
<?sPOWHATAN POINT (P) - Coal
miners left their jobs by the thou-
sands yesterday to join a mush-
rooming wildcat strike over the
firing of six union employes.
An estimated 5100 left the pits
at 13 mines in western Pennsyl-
vania and northern West Virgin-
ia, bringing to about 10,700 the to-
tal idled in the unusual dispute.
About 5600 walked out previously.
Officials of the United Mine
Workers and the companies issu-
ed appeals and demands for a re-
turn to work. But it appeared the
walkout might spread beyond this
[Press aIrea's tri-state coalfields.
orchedNo Violence
)rched So far there has been little
nipers picketing and no violence. "The
men are just staying off the job,"
a union official said.
The walkout resulted from the
dismissal Sept. 7 of six employes
of the Hanna Coal Co. mine at
Moundsville, W. Va., for alleged
participation in an unauthorized,
walkout the week before.
The dismissed workers included
Karl Kafton, president of UMW
n com- Local 1110, who called the firings
came to "unjustified and groundless."
I plan of Deny Charges
elicopter- Kafton denied that he and the
ree para- other men participated in'picket-
ne Viet- ing of the Hanna mine. "We stay-
that in- ed well off company property," he
iet Cong said. "We were there to observe

By The Associated Press
LA PAZ, Bolivia - Bolivia's
military junta declared a nation-
wide state of siege last night after
reporting 11 persons killed and an
undisclosed number injured in an
armed uprising of tin miners ear-
lier in the day.
The government said security
forces crushed the revolt, which
broke out at the Catavi-Siglos
Veinte mines high in the Andes
southwest of Lima. The area has
long been a hotbed of followers
of Cuba's Fidel Castro.
* * *
MOSCOW - The deadline for
calling a Soviet Communist party
congress, fixed by party statutes,
passed yesterday without any pub-
lic announcement of such a meet-
ing. This could indicate division
among Soviet leaders.
Under party rules, a congress
should be called every four years.
The last-the 22nd-was in Octo-
ber 1961. The rules require that a
congress must be announced at
least six weeks in advance.
Western diplomats read into the
postponement signs of indecision
and possibly even sharp division
at the top of the Soviet hierarchy
over policies and leadership per-
sonnel.
* * *
VATICAN CITY-A group of
conservative bishops was rumored
to have sent Pope Paul VI a peti-
tion to put off a Vatican Ecu-
menical Council vote in favor of
religious liberty.

Unconfirmed reports circulating
last night said that more than
100 Roman Catholic bishops from
the Council's conservative camp
had joined to send the petition.
There was no comment from offi-
cial Vatican quarters.
The rumors came after a once-
imprisoned cardinal from Commu-
nist Czechosovlakia appealed for
a Roman Catholic declaration that
men must be free to worship as
they wish.
INDIANAPOLIS-Indiana's 1965
state legislative reapportionment
law was declared unconstitutional
by a panel of three federal judges
yesterday. The ruling gave the
state until Dec. 1 to make an
equitable distributiontof thekseats
in the Indiana Senate and House.
The order gave the state three
choices-a special legislative ses-.
sion to pass a new reapportion-
ment act, an appeal to the U.S.
Supreme Court, or allowing the
federal district court to set up
the legislative districts.
WASHINGTON - The Senate
has revived' chances the United
States eventually will adopt the
metric system of weights and
measures.
By voice vote and without de-
bate yesterday, it sent to the
House a bill to authorize the Com-
merce Department to study over
the next three years the possible
junking of the English system-
inches and pounds-and replacing
it with metric units-centimeters
and kilograms.

WASHINGTON - The Senate
passed yesterday and sent to Pres-
ident Johnson the compromise bill
setting up a $90-million program
of research, development and
demonstration in high - speed
ground transportation.
The demonstrations are to be
on the Boston-to-Washington rail
lines, with proponents of the leg-
islation contending that this serv-
ice can be improved.

*FACEARMSI
*LEGS*THl!HS
EYEBROWS ud
MEN HAIRINES CORRETED
" BEARDS NEWEST SHORTWAVE
SCKES DIAL-O-MATIC METHOD
CLEARED Painless (try us)
" Years of Experience * Physician's References
357-0373
ANN L. KORSON * R.E.
* 17000 W. 8 MILE * SOUTHFIELD
" NEAR NORTHLAND SHOPPING CENTER

LUNCH-DISCUSSION
TUESDAY, September 21, 12:00 Noon
U. M. International Center
SUBJECT:
"SOUTH VIET NAM: BACKGROUND
OF THE PRESENT CONFLICT"
Speaker: Mr. Edward Vandenberg
Attorney at Law

For reservations,
call 662-5529

Sponsored by the
Ecumencial Campus Center

r

LENOY IMPORTS
DISTINCTIVE GIFTS

-Associated

Mexican Handicraf t
Sweaters
Pottery
MAYNARD HOUSE

Woolen Goods
Sara pes
Gif ts
524 E. WILLIAM

THESE SOLDIERS of the United States 101st Airborne B r i g a d e are returning from a "sC(
earth" mission in a valley north of An Khe, Viet Nam. They set fire to houses from which s
were shooting at them. This action took place Saturday.
Viet Cong Routed in Battle,
U.S. Forces Step Up Action

'i

'it
9

LIA

SAIGON WP) - United States
ground and air forces killed 155
Viet Cong guerrillas in the battle
of the hills around An Khe in
the central highlands, U.S. of-
ficials reported yesterday.
The fight, which raged over
the weekend, settled down to spor-
adic fighting with troops of the
U.S. 101st Airborne Division ap-
parently in control of the area,
17 miles northeast of An Khe.
The operation, coupled with an-
other in the jungles just north
of Saigon and a B52 air raid in
the Mekong delta, seemed to be
part of a stepped-up' U.S. initia-
tive to carry the war to the Viet
Cong and secure strategic areas.
Air Attacks
U.S. planes . continued attacks
on North Viet Nam. Communist
China claimed Chinese aircraft
shot down a U.S. F104 jet over
Hainan Island, in the Gulf of
Tonkin off North Viet Nam, and
captured its pilot. A Peking broad-
cast charged the plane intruded
in Red Chinese airspace over Hai-
nan.
Troops of the 173rd Airborne
Brigade continued their drive
against the Viet Cong around Ben
Cat, 30 miles north of Saigon, in
an effort to clear and hold an

area long infested by the Viet
Cong.,
The score in the week-long oper-
ation: seven Viet Cong killed,
three wounded and 25 captured.
South Vietnamese, Australian and
New Zealand troops also are sup-
porting the 173rd.
Bomber Attack
To the south, U.S. Strategic Air
Command B52 bombers blasted
suspected Viet Cong positions in
Vinh Binh Province, 90 miles from
the capital. It was the second B52
strike in the steaming delta area
in two days and the 28th an-
nounced strike of the war by the
eight-engine jets from Guam.
Ground troops of the 1st Ca-
valry, which arrived last week,
beat off a Viet Cong probe of
their defenses at An Khe Sunday
night, killing two of the guerrillas.
U.S. casualties were described as
light.
Troops of the 101st Airborne
were credited with killing 55 Viet
Cong in fighting. A U.S. military
officer who came to Saigon from
the An Khe area reported that
another 100 guerrillas were found
dead in a trench, presumably all
victims of air attacks.
Hand-to-Hand
The fighting at times was hand-
to-hand, said Lt. Col. Wilfrid

J. G. Smith, a battalio
mander in the 101st who
Saigon yesterday.
Smith said the origina
operation called for a he
borne assault force of thr
trooper companies and o
namese ranger company1
tended to search for a V

r
t

i

{

ll
" l
,t
f

b i

1!

I
I'i

-----

L-.i

. ...........

r

..:.----a.- .1

ME

giR
4'ip

hi

;Now* NEW

I

battalion believed in the area,
Smith said.
An initial lift of paratroopers
was made with little resistance
other than scattered sniper fire
Saturday. But the second lift met
with furious blasts of fire from
automatic weapons and mortars.
Taken by Surprise
The Viet Cong had apparently
been taken by surprise in the first
drop but had asembled in their
defensive positions by the time the
second lift appeared, Smith said.
A small but furious battle erupt-
ed between about 260 troopers and
about 300 or so Viet Cong. It
lasted for almost 48 hours before
the Viet Cong were driven off.
One charge to take a knoll,
from which mortar fire was com-
ing, failed. But Smith said a
lieutenant, not identified, reor-
ganized half a platoon of para-
troopers and led- a charge to clear
the hill. The lieutenant who led
the charge was killed.

the picket area, which is com-
pletely within the scope and au-
thority of union officials."
He called company charges that
they participated in the strike "a
complete fabrication."
Hanna said it would not nego-
tiate the dispute until the men
reported back to their jobs. Com-
pany officials declined further
comment.
Urge End of Strike
W. A. Tony Boyle, the union's
international p r e s i d e n t, and
Thomas A. Williams, president of
UMW District 6, urged the strik-
ers to go back to their jobs, pend-
ing settlement under terms of the
contract.
But Kafton asserted: "We know
what the contract says. But this
goes deeper than the contract. It's
a conspiracy." He said he has re-
quested Boyle to name a special
commission to look into internal
problems of locals.

i
3

.i
i

I

SPECIAL VALUES
JUMPERS
1199
TREMENDOUS SELECTIONS!
PLAIDS, HERRINGBONES,

. f
t
I
i
,,.
t . .
tF
i
e

Y/
t 7frfr
1 /a
t$,K1
A Y

2
I

I4

rr

, i *
>1

If

I

SH ETLA
S

i

ELECTION RESULTS:
Erhard To Head German Government;

Continues Firm Friendship w

BONN (I)--Chancellor Ludwig
Erhard's personal victory in Sun-
day's general election was under-
scored yesterday when his Chris-
tian Democratic party formally
told ex-Chancellor Konrad Ade-
nauer to present Erhard's name
to President Heinrich Luebke as
the head of the next West German

his coalition with Deputy Chan-
cellor Erich Mende's Free Demo-
crats.
After yesterday morning's meet-
ing of the Christian Democratic
leaders, Erhard and Adenauer
were grinning broadly and said
they were happy.
Socialist leaders met in an at-

home. The structured society, he
explained during the campaign,
would be one in which hitherto
opposed groups acquired a better
idea of the need for working to-
gether in the public interest.
Adenauer always was glad to
acknowledge Erhard as the father
of West Germany's "economic

ith U.S.
the spread of nuclear weapons-
a proposal he must have known
that the Erhard government help-
ed draft.
Erhard praised Adenauer pub-
licly as a "great European," but
Adenauer never had a kind word
to say in public about the man
who succeeded him after 14 years

I,

C

sND HEATHERS .. .
dZES 6 to 16

. ,
t
i''
.V+ ""'7
i %

I

s
I
1

V

{
. s w «....o
. .! __. N 4I
i I

11

I

I ii

I 1 I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan