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September 16, 1965 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-09-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAT. SEPTEMBER ,If i Y.,

__ IC I AN D Iy ITRSrA g'T.'.UT#i o ,....aa *,S.SS aN

7LL1 i , ojpr 11J1\1DL' iV 10, 1710a7

}

Ray 's evi': Indian's
Richest Film to Date

LACKS PLOT:
'Woman' Grasps at Straws

By MICHAEL JULIAR

-Daily-Robert Sheffield
THESE STUDENTS PREPARE the space on the top of the Maynard St. parking structure, an im-
portant part of the experimental arts festival ONCE AGAIN 1965.
Ex Xl 10H0RR RO RO
Exei etl'nce' oncert,
T SI
-Uay at -ar 1ug S c Hre

At The Cinema Guild
"Devi" (1960) is a film you
should not miss. Some people will
be bored with it but I will never
forget it.
Set in 19th century Bengal, it
is the moody story of a very rich7
and prayerful father who receives
the visionary word that his daugh-
ter-in-law is the incarnation of
Bengal's most revered goddess,
Kali, mother of all.{
As the young bride - 17 years
old and three years married -
and most of the household suc-
cumb to the father-in-law's will,
she herself begins to take the su-
perstitious road of belief and ques-
tions whether she is really hu-
man after all. Her husband, a
"progressive and Westernized" In-
dian, working hard in school to
become an educated man and
vaguely thinking of the day he
might flaunt his due inheritance,
weakly tries to oppose his fath-
er and make his wife run away
with him. But it is too late. All
of Bengal believes in the incar-
nation, chiefly because of the child
she brings out of an apparently
fatal coma. The young bride, half
in bewilderment about what has
happened and half in belief that
it has all happened because of her
godly powers, turns back to the
father-in-law.
Too late again, the son de-
cides to tell his father how wrong
the old man really is and to take
his wife away. A sick nephew dies
in the girl's arms, the stunned
house can't reconcile it and begins
to react to the "witch." And the
"witch" can only run-from the
demons she senses are infesting
her mad mind.
Beyond Freudian overtones, cri-
ticism of traditional Indian beliefs,
and sensitive commentary on 19th
century indolence, "Devi" is Sat-

By STEVEN HALLER again by Hitchcock and others; Sinfonia of London handling the
yajit Ray's richest film yet. Fol- here everything is about as fresh background music (by Berlioz,
lowing his episodic "Apu Trilogy" At The S and original at President Hatch- Beethoven, and the rest of the
and "The Music Room," Ray has State Theater er's speech to incoming freshmen. gang) as if they were doing some-
chosen a dramatic story. But he The usual stereotype characters thing besides merely prqviding a
still has not shed himself, un- With "Woman of Straw," Unit- are competently enough handled tense background of chords for
fortunately, of the genius to cre- ed Artists once again drags out. by -a cast that should be glad the passionate kisses between Mr.
ate mood and atmosphere that can the old routine about the beauti- whole thing's over and done with. Connery and Miss Lollobrigida.
often be more revealing than any ful girl marrying an old man for Ralph Richardson blusters monot-1# Unless your hi-fi is on the blink
amount of plotting. his money and attempts to trans- onously and plays plenty of clas- and you don't mind spending a
Plot is still there, but it is form that old scarecrow of a plot sical music like mean old men in buck and a quarter to hear bits
played down. The very, very slow into a suspense-filled - mystery, such stories always do; Gina Lol- and snatches of the Symphonie
pace of every scene, the languid, Unfortunately, despite the best ef- lobrigida bounces around in her Fantastique and Beethoven's Ninth
limping plot that unfolds like a forts of the cast, the effort to black negligee and somehow man- in air-conditioned comfort, how-
flower, were created by Ray to rescusitate this old chestnut ends ages to feign terror or anger with- ever, this is not enough. But don't
allow him to work deply with a up with everyone grasping at out bursting into. laughter at the despair: as I'm sure you all know,
character in a setting. It allows straws. script; and Sean Connery, every- "Help" is on the way.
him to use the landscape of the The main reason "Woman of body's favorite good guy, proves
river flats and the architecture of Straw" does not succeed is a basic to be ideally suited as the heavy.
the palatial house as Antonioni fact of life about movie story The last straw is the quality of R Re d
never fails to do. It allows him to ideas: when they get as hoary the film processing itself, which
slow the story down to such a as this one, it takes a genius like is pretty bad, being badly spliced'
nerve-crying pace that each mo- Alfred Hitchcock to make them and afflicted to attacks of green Da I
ment can be studied, perused, en- fresh and exciting. Unfortunate- and yellow streaks shooting across
joyed. ly, tense direction is what this the screen. The real stars of theCIasfld
Because of this, there are as film sadly lacks. Indeed, even the show are Muir Mattheson and the
many climaxes in the mood as twists of plot that are employed____
there are in the plot. For instancehave been used over and over
we know that the nephew will _ __SHOWS AT E DIAL

By MARK SLOBIN
ONCE AGAIN 1965, a three-con-
cert weekend of unusual and spec-
tacular music, dance, and theatre
will take place Friday, Saturday,
and Sunday evenings at 8:30 on
top of the Maynard Street park-
ing structure.
The show is being filmed by the
United States Information Agen-
cy from start to finish to be shown
overseas as part of a series on
"The Arts.,in America.",
ONCE AGAIN 1965 includes a
homegrown Ann' Arbor total thea-
tre piece scheduled by .the ONCE
group for its appearance, at the
Sao Paulo Bienal international
arts festival, to which the group
was invited as a representative
from the United States.
"Unmarked Interchange," slat-
ed for the opening concert Friday,

is a joint creation of many artists.
Architects Harold Borkin and Jo-
seph Wehrer have built a 20-foot,
three level scaffolding on which
the piece will be performed, and'
they will also take part in the per-
formance.
Borkin and Wehrer are nation-
ally prominent architects.
"Unmarked Interchange" will
present-live and filmed theatre ac-
tivities. The old-Fred Astaire-Gin-
ger Rogers-Irving Berlin movie
"Top Hat" will be projected
against the scaffolding when live,
cyclic events will be carried on
.continually behind and in front
of sliding drawers, louvers, and
panels.
Saturday night a group of danc-
ers from New York will present
"A Concert for Ann Arbor." Mem-
bers of the group, including paint-

er Robert Rauschenberg, former
long-distance runner Alex Hay,
Deborah Hay, Lucinda Childs,.
Steye Paxton, and' Trisha Brown,
formerly belonged to the Judson
Dance Group, most recently writ-
ten up in Saturday Review (Au-
gust 28 issue). The dancers will
present works of their own, which
are as distant from the traditional
concept of modern dance as they
are from ballet.
On Sunday evening, composer
John Cage and his longtime co-
worker David Tudor will present
the premiere performance of "Talk
I," a free-form lecture employing'
many different kinds of sound
and words. Cage's voice will pro-
vide live sound, manipulated in
various ways, while Tudor will
handle specially-built electronic
ecuipment'to produce a wide range
of musical activity.

die and consequently the entire
house will simply decay in baffle-
ment at the turn in events. The
plot is working in just that direc-
tion. But the mood conjures the
real climax, as the distraught
father-in-law sits before his idols
and incense and asks the gods
what his sin was.
The acting, naturally, since it is
a Ray film, is superb. The pho-
tography is beautiful and control-
led only as a director of Ray's
stature can make it. It is never
pedantic or fussy, capricious or
neurotic. It holds its images for
the proper time and effect and
then releases them.
For reasons I could only have
room to explain in a book, I pre-
fer his "Apu Trilogy" and one of
the stories from his "Two Daugh-
ters" over "Devi." But I think
that "Devi" will grow on me. Give
it a chance to grow on you by
making it to the Cinema Guild to-
night or tomorrow night.

PH. 483-4680
Enaan" On CARPENTER ROAD
NOW SHOWING
EUZABETH TAYLOR
RICHARD BURTON
EVA MARIE SAINT
IN MA RIN RA N$OM50 F.S RLO DUUCTT ON MAAtlrnNMROtR'
ADDED--COMEDY HIT
Jane Fonda-Tony Franciosa
2 CARTOONS AT DUSK
BOX OFFICE OPENS 6:30

WILLIAM WIYLER'S
the collector-9
"A SHOCKER sure to quicken the pulse"!.I
" A SHOCKER to rivet you to your sea t!'s NUM
"**** * An electrifying experience!"
N.Y. DAILY NEWS
z ~ WNNER"
cwa n mFesaat,,
'IENCE STAMPf aF '
SAARMA

7-9 P.M'.

[G'vmm ui ,

8-64161

I'

MICHIGAN

ENDS TONIGHT
JAMES STEWART
In
; SHENAN 1tA'E "

Outside the Classroom this Week

* STARTING FRIDAY

- Dial 662-6264

I

HeCame ....He Saw.
He Tinkered!
$PEClAL ROAk SH NGAGErMENT

By VICKI LASSAR
and DALE GOLD
Special Events
The Kingston Trio-Hill Audi-
torium (8 p.m, Sept. 18). -
Once Again 1965-Festival of
spectacular theatre, music, and
dance in an unusual environment.
Three programs of premier per-
formances with electronic music,
film, dance, stage sculpture, and
light projection especially design-
ed for outdoor performances. (Pre-
sented top level Maynard park-
ing structure, 8:30 p.m., Sept. 17,
18, 19, single admission $1.50, se-
ries $4.)
Festival Schedule: Sept. 17 -
"Unmarked Interchange," an orig-
inal total-theatre work by the,
Once Group of Ann Arbor. Sept. 18-
--"Concert for Ann Arbor," exper-
imental dance compositions by
guest artists, Lucinda Childs, Alex
Hay, Deborah Hay,. Robert Mor-
ris, Steve Paxton, and Robert
Rauschenberg. Sept. 19-"Talk I,"
by . the internationally famous

composer, John
David Tudor.

Cage, assisted byI

* * *
Art
Forsythe Gallery, 201 Nickels
Arcade--Sculpture nd painting
abstracts in metal and wood by
N'arenda M. Patel. Meet the artist
'Sunday afternoon, Sept. 19, from
3-5. (Weekdays, 10-4; Saturday,
10-1, Sept. 19-Oct. 14; free.)
Museum of Art, State St.-Chi-
nese and Japanese painting and
sculpture'.... Contemporary paint-
ings and sculpture from the mu-
seum collection . . . Italian, Dutch,:
and English prints and drawings
.. Goya prints. (Monday-Satur-
day, 9-5; Sunday, 2-5.)
Kelsey Museum, State St.-Col-
lections from Egypt, Greece, Rome
. .Islamic Art and Coptic tex-
tiles. (Weekdays, 1-4; Sunday, 3-
5; closed Saturday.)
Architecture and Design Build-
ing-Reed City, an experimental
architecture exhibit. (Through
Sept. 29.) -
"The Crisis of the Object in
Twentieth Century Art," Dr. Alan

Solomon, art critic and director of
U.S. exhibition at the 1964 Venice
Biennale, speaks in the Architec-
ture and Design Auditorium. (4
p.m., Sept. 16.)
* * *
- Cinema
Cinema Guild, Architecture and
Design Auditorium-"Devi," Sat-
yajit Ray's Ann Arbor first, with
"The Spoiler's Fight Sequence."
(7 and.9 p.m., Sept. 16, 17.)
"Cyrano de Bergerac," Edmund
Rostand's masterpiece stars Jose
Ferrer In his greatest screen role,
featuring the movies' greatest
sword fight. (7 and 9 p.m., Sept.
J8, 19.)
Prize-winning films from the
1964- Ann Arbor Film Festival, se-
lected to represent the best of
America's new breed of films at
South America's Sao Paolo Film
Festival. (7 and 9 p.m., Sept. 22.)
Campus Theatre, South Univer-
sity--"The Collector," Samantha
Eggar and Terence Stamp, Cannes
Film Festival award winners. (7
,and 8 p.m., through Sept. 22.)
Michigan Theatre, East Liberty

-"Shenandoah," James Stewart.'
(1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 p.m., Sept. 16.)
"Cary on Cleo," Sidney James
and Kenneth Williams. (7 and 9
p.m., Sept. 17-22.)
State Theatre, State St.-"Wom-
an of Straw," Gina Lollobrigida
and Sean Connery. (7 and 9 p.m.,
Sept. 16, 17.)
"Help," the Beatles. (12:45,
4:45, 7, and 9:05 p.m., Sept. 18-'
22.)
Music
Recital Hall, School of Music--
Morris Lawrence will present a
doctoral clarinet recital. (8:30
p.m., Sept. 16.)
Hill Auditorium-Organ Recital
Conference. Kim Kasling. (4 p.m.,
Sept. 19.)
Marilyn Mason, with the Uni-
versity Chamber Choir and Thom-
as Hilbish, conductor. (8 p.m.,
Sept. 20.)
James Moeser. (4 p.m., Sept. 21.)
Raymond Daveluy. (8:30 p.m.,
Sept. 21.)
Radio
WUOM FM 91.7 me. Ann Arbor.
Creative Arts Lecture-Radcliffe
Squires, poet and U. of M. pro-
fessor, reads from his, work. (1
p.m., Sept. 16.)
German Elections - Live from
Bonn, Germany, full trans-Atlan-
tic coverage of the elections in
West Germany, timely reports
augmented by discussion of the
significance of the elections to

Europe and America, and profiles
of the candidates. (3 p.m., Sept.
19.)
World Theatre - Shakespeare's
"The Winter Tale," part I. (1:50
p.m., Sept. 19.)
Music of the Masters-Beet-
hoven: Violin Sonata in A major,
Op. 30, no. 1-Zino Francescatti,
violinist . . . Mozart: Symphony
no 41 in C major K. 551 ("Jupi-
ter")--London Philharmonic Or-
chestra, Erich Leinsdorf, conduc-
tor . . Tchaikovsky: Swan Lake
-Philadelphia Orchestra, Eugene
Ormandy, conductor. (8:05 p.m.,
Sept. 21.)
Opera Night-Weber: "Per Frei-
schutz," a Bavarian Radio per-
formance. (7 p.m., Sept. 22.)
OUT OF TOWN
Art
Detroit Institute of Arts, 5200
Woodward Ave., Detroit-Art Is-
rael, 26 painters and sculptors or-
ganized by the Museum of Modern
Art, featuring two influential Is-
rael masters, Mordecai Ardon and
Josef Zaritsky. (Tues.-Fri., 9-9;
Sat., and ; Sun., 9-6, through Oct.
Theatre
Fisher Theatre, 2nd and West
Grand Blvd., Detroit-"Skyscrap-
er," based on Emma Rice's "Dream
Girl," with Julie Harris and Victor
Spinetti. (Nightly at ,8:30 p.m.,
matinees Wed. and Sat., throughj
Oct. 1; reserved seats.)J

NOW PLAYING
Shows at 1:00-3:05-
5:05-7:00 & 9:05
. bM en them
was conceived m mw.i

DAILY OFFICIAL BU LLETIN
:: .. . .":: .. J:::r:Jr:',.r""::.~"1:.:" r : : :Vr:""r" ":"T....^. ... ...... ...... ." .....11:..............~............ f
!.. : ? :{v.:r"..'."} . .......... ....*......*.............*...*".." ...... . . ..r.1..... r......F." ::.".: ::: ... "

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
- sity of Michigan, for which The
. Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to'
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 16
DayCalendar
Programmed Learning for Business
Workshop-Paul G. Herrick, director,
"Using, Evaluating, Selecting, and Writ-
ing Programmed Materials": Michigan
Union, 8:30 a.m.
Training and Development, Personnel
Office University Management Seminar
-L. Clayton Hill, professor emeritus.,
Graduate School of Business Adminis-
tration, "Basics of Supervision": 5046
Kreske Haringe
Kresge Hearing Research, 8:30 a.m.
Training and Development, Personnel
Office University Management Seminar
-Daniel R. Miller, professor of, psy-
chology,' "On-the-Job Interviewing and
Counseling": Michigan Union, 1 p.m.
School of Music Doctoral R9cital -
Morris Lawrence, clarinetist: Recital
Hall, School of Music, 8:30 p.m.
Cinema Guild-Satyajit Ray's "Devi":
Architecture Aud.,'7 and 9 p.m.
Lecture: Dr. Alan R. Solomon, dis-
tinguished art critic,, and director of
the U.S. exhibition at the 1964 Venice
Biennale, will speak in the Architec-
ture and Design Aud., under the spon-
sorship 'of the Department of Art, Col-
. lege of Architecture and Design, the
University of Michigan on Sept. 16,

Thurs., at 4 p.m. His talk is open to
the public, and the Dramatic Art Cen-
ter, through which his appearance was
arranged, encourages its members to
attend.
Botany Seminar: Dr. Morris Grindle
will give a seminar on "Extrachrom-
osomal Mutants of Aspergiilus Nidu-
lans," Thurs., Sept., 16, 4:15 p.m., 1139
Natural Science Bldg. Tea will be served
at 4.
Mathematical Statistics Colloquium:
Thurs., Sept. 16, 4 p.m., Room 3201 An-
gell Hall. W. A. Ericson will speak on
"A Simple Decision Model for Sam-
pling Nonresponses."
General Notices
Institute of International Education
announces that applications for Ful-
bright-Haystawards for graduate study
in Afghanistan, Ceylon, Iceland. Iran,
Korea, Malaysia,, Nepal, Pakistan, Por-
tugal, Rumania, Thailand, Turkey and
participating Latin American countries
may be submitted by students who
have spent more than three consecu-
tive months in the country during the
3 years prior to May 1, 1966. Other
qualifications being equal, applicants
who have spent less than this 3-
month period will be given preference..
Applications are available in the Grad-
uate Fellowship Office, Room 110 Rack-
ham Bldg.
NSF Traineeships: Instructions for
preparing for 1966-67 NSF Trainee-
ships were mailed to department chair-
men and deans on Sept. 13, from the
Graduate Fellowship Office. Completed
applications are due in Room 118
Rackham Bldg. by Oct. 14.
Graduate Students expecting to re-
ceive the master's degree or profession-
al degree in December 1965 must file a
Diploma Application with the Recorder
of the Graduate School by Fri., Sept.
17. A student will not be recommended
for a degree unless he has filed formal
application in the office of the Grad-

uate School by that date.
Medical College Admission Test: Ap-
plication blanks for the Medical Col-
lege Admission Test are available in
122 Rackham Bldg. The next admis-
sion of the test will be Sat., Oct. 23,
and applications must be received in
New York, N.Y., by Oct. 8.
Fall Term .Fees: At least 50 per cent
is due and payable on or before Sept.
30, 1965.
Non-payment of at least 50 per cent
by Sept, 30 will result in the assess-
ment of- a delinquent penalty of $5.
Payments may be made in person
or mailed to the Cashier's Office, 1015
Administration Bldg., before 4:30 p.m.,
Thurs., Sept. 30.
Mail Early.
Mail payments postmarked after due
date, Sept, 30, are late and subject to
penalty.
-Identify mail payments as tuition
and show student number and name.
Foreign Visitors
The following area the foreign visi-
tors programmed through the Interna-
tional Center who will be on campus
this week on the dates indicated. Pro-
gram arrangements are being made by
Mrs. Clifford R. Miller, International
Center, 764-2148.
- Milos .Misovic, editor of NIN, week-
ly supplement of "Uolitika," Belgrade
Yugoslavia, Sept. 9-Dec. 15.
All D. Arseven, associate in measure-
ment, Ankara, Turkey, Sept, 12-Oct. 15.
Alfred Searle, professor of chemical
engineering, University of Concepcion.,
Chile, Sept. 12-Oct. 15.
(Continued on Page 6)

TINA LOLORIGIDA
SEAIN CONNERY
RALPH RCRDSON
s. MICHAEL RELPHl,.,o
BASIL DEAROEN'5,.ODUCMo.
EASTMANCOLOR
Released thru
UNITED ARTISTS

While the characters and events in this story
are based on actual characters
and events, certain liberties have
been taken with Cleopatra.

fA
I>)nn~
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Ii,_

APETERROGERSom UC In EXOTICOO,©R
SIDNEY JAMES -AMANDA BARRIE- KENNETH WILLAMS-JOAN SIMS- KENNETH CONNOR-CHARLES HAWREY
A SOUNDS wStl AtEL

CHRISTIAN UNITY AND DIVERSITY
AN INTRODUCTION
TO ECUMENICAL
DIALOGUE
for undergraduates of all denominations
FIRST oF rof. Louis Orlin
SEVEN SESSIONS
7 .Mw. eman Center
THURS., SEPT. 16 331 Thompson .

r __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ __I_ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

UM Professional Theatre Program - P IN

Sponsored by:

Ecumenical Campus Staff

YOU CAN'T
TAKE IT
WITH YOU
by
GEORGE S. KAUFMAN
and MOSS HART
The classic
American comedy!
Directed by
Ellis Rabb
Set Designer: James Tilton
Costume Designer: Nancy Potts

and Newman Student Assoe.

THE
WILD DUCK
by
HENRIK MBEN
A new version
off the poignant drama
Directed by
Stephen Porter
Set Designer: James Tilton
Costume Designer: Nancy Potts

ARCHIBALD MAC LESH
The Pulitzer Prize
playwright's provocative
new play
Directed by
MartSchnieider
Set Designer: James Tilton
Costume Designer: Nancy Potts
Also:
KW'PS LAST TAE
by SAMUEL BECKETT
'Fadnating theatre
a/the absurd'

it
s'

L'--._

UA~tion

is NEW ACTION

i

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