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November 22, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-11-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


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?rSI rP

Sitigi~ian

Iaihg

76- 1-0352

Presents
"SHIP OF FOOLS"
SATURDAY, NOV.s22, 7 & 9 P.M.
1429 H ILL ST.
ADMISSION 75c
"WE'RE ALL IN THE SAME BOAT"

Saturday, November 22, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

the
news today
by T h' Assoc ated Press and C olle e Press Seriice

AGREEMENT WITH JAPAN

U.S. to return Okinawa

El'

'y The Associated Press
President Nixon fulfilled an 18-
ARMY AGENTS broadened their investigation into the al- year-old pledge and agreed to turn
leged 1968 massacre of South Vietnamese civilians. Okinawa back to Japan in 1972
Denying that the government has been guilty of a cover-up in without nuclear weapons on the
what may become an international issue, Robert Jordan, an army island.
counsel, announced that the army has increased the scope of its The decision made in a joint
investigations to include nine more army men and 15 ex-soldiers. communque was not the final
One officer has already been charged with murder and a staff island. Among other details which
sergeant has been charged with assault with intent to commit murder remain to be negotiated are eco-
in the incident. In addition, the army has already questioned about nomic problems surrounding the
75 persons including South Vietnamese concerning the alleged killings. future of U.S. business interests.
The investigators have not yet decided whether to proceed with Nixon assured that the rever-
courts-martial of the two men. however. sion of Okinawa to Japanese rule

50th Prouictioni
Lyia.VIU UfeII(IeN%01I .Theatr

H.M.S.
WED. and THURS.
Dec. 3
8 PM 7

P i de

FRIDAY
Dec. 5
and 9:30 PM

SATURDAY
Dec. 6
1 :3 and 8 P.M.

The U of M G & S Society is in the process of selecting staff for the coming semes-
ter. Any interested persons are invited to apply before Nov. 30

I NM N1
t
3
,
__

'PHI EPSILON IN

THE SENATE FOREIGN RELATIONS COMMITTEE de-
cided to hold hearings on Vietnam.
The decision, which is likely to involve only administration offic-
ials and senators who have sponsored a series of Vietnam resolutions,
was passed by a 7-2 margin following lengthy debate not involving
party lines.
Although no official date has been set foi the beginning of the
talks, they are expected to start immediately following the comple-
tion of work on the foreign aid bill. Discussions concerning that matter
are expected to begin following the Thanksgiving recess.
The hearings will consider as many as nine resolutions which
have been introduced into the Senate.
REAL EARNINGS PRCHASING POWER remained below
year-ago levels for the ninth consecutive month in October.
Although food prices decined slightly, the drop was offset by
large increases in the costs of housing and new cars which were up
close to five per cent over a year ago.
The October rise in prices was slightly less than the average
monthly increase for this year, which has been running close to 5.9
per cent. But despite a one-cent hike in average hourly pay, the de-
cline in hours resulting from Nixon's tight anti-inflation policies re-
duced the average gross weekly paycheck 86 cents to $116.94, the first
drop in eight months.
Statistics released by the labor department also indicated that
although the average worker earned $6.65 a week more than he did
a year ago, his purchasing power after tax deductions and the ero-
sion of inflation was actually 82 cents less.
REP. ROBERT TAFT JR. announced he will seek the Re-
publican nomination for the Senate from Ohio.
Taft, whose father became known s "Mr. Republican" in the
Senate, will battle with Gov. James A. Rhodes, who has already an-
nounced his intention to run for the seat now held by the 80-year-
old Stephen Young, a Democrat.
Young will not run again because of his age.

"would be carried out in a man-
ner consistent with the policy of
the Japanese government." This
meant that Japan would have a
veto over the use of U.S. military
base facilities in the future.
The communique itself opened
the way for much change in the
future relations between Japan
and the United States, however.
and did not rule out the use of
nuclear weapons on Okinawa if
Japan's security were threatened.
And Prime Minister Eisaku Sato,
for whom the decision marked the
climax of a Japanese political goal
sought since the end of World
War IL also reaffirmed the need
for continued U.S. military use
of the bases on Okinawa and
throughout Japan.
Indeed, Sato indicated that the
area now affecting Japan's se-
curity included the entire Far
East.
Specifically, Sato said an armed
attack against South Korea would
threaten Japanese security, and
he assured that the Japanese gov-
ernment would promptly make its
areas available for use as military
bases for combat operations In
case of such an occurence.
In addition. Sato said Japan
would cooperate in the rehabili-
tation of Vietnam, Cambodia and
Laos after the Vietnam war endss
and that Japan would participate
in any international peacekeep-
ing machinery set up after the
hostilities.

i
1'
{

,_

Prine 1inister Eisaki Sato

Apollo 12 astronu ts
l)egin returii to Earth141
. SPACE CENTER, Houston ' r- The Apollo 12 astronauts
fired themselves out of lunar orbit yesterday while circling
the back side of the moon and began the return flight to
earth.
The rocket burn was one of the last major hurdles to
returning to earth, although there will be optional periods
during the descent to earth when the astronauts will be able
to alter their course for a more exact landing in the Pacific

F

I Emma SLII*al

FURATERNITY

LAWSUIT CONTINUES:
Judge refuses Second Corning
ifj urnctioin agaitist LM U actions

F

W DY ~WIWW'
$U~4DlY - PvQ

CAI t 7 l1

By JIM N~EUBACHIER
5S)ecial To The Daily
DETROIT--Attorneys for the
Second Coming yesterday lost
their bid for a preliminary injunc-
tion which wvould have prevented
Eastern Michigan University of-
ficials from threatening disciplin-
ary action against the staff of the
underground paper.
The failure by Second Coming
attorneys to obtain the prelimin-
ary injunction seemed to hinge on
a misstatement, early in the 90
minute session, by Second Coming
attorney Buck Davis.
Presiding Federal District Judge
Steven Roth asked Davis to ex-

t* # :: M

i ts fem..;
3. G .. ' *t '+ 4

plain what he would like the in- business and finance before being
junction to say if it. were issued. sold on campus. This is exactly the
"We just want an assurance, 'trule Second Coming attorneys!

your honor, that the Second Com-
ing will be accorded the same
privileges as any other publication
sold at Eastern Michigan Unier-
sity." Davis said.
Defense Attorney Kenneth Bron-
son immediately jumped to his
feet and told the court that EMU
officials would be happy to treat
the Second Coming just like any
other commercial publication.
Currently, all commercial pub-
lications at EMU must receive the
approval of the vice president for

\RP

'70a At~

SUMMER CHA RTER FLIGHTS

Shows at 1,
3, 5, 7, 9 P.M DIAL
5-6290
The generation gap is more than just
long hair, loud music, or a misunderstanding
of ideals between father and son.
It is a void from which a new force
must emerge, a new hero!.,.
Michael Douglas.Teresa Wright
and Arthur Kennedy

were challenging.
Roty i wasapparently impressed
'by the "offer" from EMU's at-!
torneys. In his decision, he said
he denied the request "upon as-
surance from counsel for the de-
fense that the Second ComingI
would be accorded the same rights1
and privileges as other commercial
publications."
The Second Coming, publishedj
by a non-profit corporation chars,
tered by EMU students and faculty1
members, has been banned from
the EMU campus by President
Harold Sponberg because of ad-
niinistrative displeasure with its
content. Second Coming staff:
members have charged this in-
fringes on their constitutional1
guarantees of freedom of the press,
and have filed a lawsuit against
the administration.
The injunction, if approved,
would have stopped EMU admin-
istirative action against the paper,
pending a decision on the merits'
of the lawsuit.
With the denial of the request
for the injunction, the lawsuit willi
move ahead. No data has been set
for the first hearing on the case,
however, and lawyers for both sides
said yesterday the action might
involve lengthy litigation.?

Monday afternoon.
The jolting burst of power in-
creased the speed of the space-
ship Yankee Clipper from about
3700 to 5700 miles an hour, enough
to escape the grip of lunar grav-
ity and send the spacecraft on a
great arc to earth, 240,724 miles
a way.
T h e astronauts, reportedly
weary after their record-breaking
hours of moon-walking, faced a
relatively quiet three days of
flight back to earth, but k e p t
themselves busy yesterday after-
noon reeling off magazine after
magazine of film to photograph
long strips of the lunar su'face.
In addition, the crew sent back
a series of color television trans-
missions that were flashed live
on national television networks.
The television pictures came a
bit early, but Gordon said, "We're
leaving the in o o n so fast we
thought we'd better send it now."
Witnessing the telecast of the
crew flashing more than 400
miles from the moon within five
minutes of reappearing from thel
back side, Mission Control quip-;
ped "We get the impression you're
on a very fast elevator."
But with just more than five
hours of sleep in the latest rest'
period, the crew seemed a bit let
down and r e a d y to return to
earth.
"How are things near the
moon?" Mission Control asked.
"Not too bad," answered Rich-
ard Gordon, Yankee Clipper pi-
lot, "but I think we're about ready
to leave."
While t h e astronauts readied
their rocket for a return to earth,
one of the experiments they had;
left on the moon performed a pre-1
set operation.
It was a gadget designed to an-
alyze the nature of the solar wind,
the high energy gases blown off
by the sun. An automatic timer
made it eject its dust covers now
that the explorers were well away
from the moon.

Deati Spurr'
n mm i
Spurr spent the next ten years
at Harvard a a researcher and
assistant proftessor of forestry. He
vas granted a Ph.D. by Yale in
1950, and from there .ent to the
University of Minnesota as asso-
ciate professor of forestry.
le came to the University in
that position in 1952. During his
time in Ann Arbor, Spurr has help-
ed develop the use of aerial photo-
graphs in forestry research and
has invented devices for conduct-
ing such studies.
He is the author of several books
and has served as advisor to pri-
vate industry, several federal
agencies and to foreign govern-
ments on forest management and
conservation.
Spurr vas named tie head of
the natural resources school in
June, 1962, and in October of the
same year was appointed as assis-
tant to the vice president for aca-
demic affairs.
In 1964, he was appointed as
head of the graduate school.
Four alumni have been named
to receive University Outstanding
Achievement Awards for their con-
tribution to public service, aca-
demic achievement, and profes-
sional practice.
The awards will be given at the
U-M Men's Glee Club concert Nov.
22.
Recipients of the awards are
Raymond Dykema, who received
his law degree in 1911: Roger
Brown, who received his doctorate
in psychology in 1962: Linn Smith,
who received his bachelor of sci-
ence degree in architecture in 1942,
and Louis Smullin, who received
his BS in engineering in 1936.

FLIGHT NO. 1:
FLIGHT NO. 2:
FLIGHT NO. 3:
FLIGHT NO. 4:

Windsor to London
Brussels to Windsor
AIR CANADA JET
Detroit to London
Paris to Detroit
TWA JET
Windsor to London
Brussels to Windsor
AIR CANADA JET
New York to London
Brussels to New York
SABENA JET

May 3
June 1
May 7
June 26
May 6
August 16
June 28
August 15

$210.00
$210.00
$215.00
$215.00

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