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November 21, 1969 - Image 2

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, November 21, 1969

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, November21, 1969

-poetry and prose

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The

new Generation:

A

credit

to allusion

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By BETSY SMITH
When student writing is al-
lusive, it is at its best in the
current Generation. The poems
which merely hint at states of
being, whether they are spare
or heavily weighted with imag-
ery, succeed most completely in
moving the reader into the cre-
ator's world. Konstantinos Lar-
das' "Encounters" is a case in
point. There is only one word,
"adoringly," which concretely
indicates the poet's attitude to-
ward the flowers. In the rest of
the poem, the flowers speak and
invite the reader to participate
in the poet's experience. Other-
wise, the poet enters only on the
same level as the flowels: "mine,
eyes, my, mind, mine, heart;"
he is of the poem, and compre-
hrended within its fabric.
It is difficult to establish this
level of coherent being in prose,
where the writer wishes always
to communicate as well as com-
prehend his vision. 'here are
moments of exaltation in the
prose as well, but these succeed
at the expense of the total piece.
In D. W. Rajecki's "The Ani-
mals of Lac du Chien" the mol-
luse's agony is best understated.
. . ..a nearby fish flicked, and
a tiny piece of quartz was waft-
ed into t h e mollusc's left bi-
valve." A general tendency to
over - write and over - explain
mars this piece, as the author-
ial interventions irritate the
reader in W. C. Steere's "Yours,
From Ike and Me." The story is
not the reader's precisely be-
cause Steere is so constantly
promising it to him ("Now, ah
. . Reader, just slide in a lit-
tle closer please".
A lesson is to be learned from
Masud Zavarzadeh's "Initia-
tion," and Michael Roberts'
"White Chapel Cemetery," the
lesson of lyricism. "Initiation"
is quietly dramatic, a medita-
tion which can be read again
and again with increasing de-
light at t h e slight variations
within the unvarying lines.
something switches under the
door of the large room
the short man concentrates
measures the distance between
the footstool and the floor
with his eyes
When the bell rings the poem
has prepared for that Zen-like
isolation and unity. The read-
er has been permitted to enter
the room and d a n c e in the
blank, intellectual rhythms of
NHIK performs
The NHK Symphony Orchestra,
conducted by Hiroyuki Iwaki, will
giveta concert at the University
in the Choral Union Series at
8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 25.
The concert in.Hill Aud., spon-
sored by the University Musical
Society, will be the Japanese or-
chestra's first Ann Arbor appear-
ance.
The program will be "Bugaku"
by Mayuzumi; Concerto for Vio-
lin and Orchestra by Khachuatu-
iian with Yoshio Unno as soloist,
and Symphony No. 5 by Tchaikov
sky.
The orchestra, which has been
acclaimed in England, France.
Switzerland, the Soviet Union, and
other countries, made its first visit
to America in 1960. It was heard
in Washington and New York that
year, and in 1966 performed in Los
Angeles and San Francisco on its
way to South America.
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to the fretted melodrama of
The girl groped slowly away
from them, knowing even
more than they did, the hate-
fulness of their joke ...
Resentment festered, but be-
cause of the physical odds, it
promised never to be resolved.
Although the girls function well
symbolically, as the horror we
ignore or even manipulate in
our daily lives, on the human'
plane they never convince us of
their reality, interpreted either
through time, as they grow old,
or poetically, in reflections of
their inner states. They cannot
bear the weight of interpreta-
tion he wishes to attach to
them.
Exotic themes abound in Nor-
man D. Hindley's poems a n d
Peter Brett's story, "Earth-
quake in Asia Minor." The ex-
otic nature of the imagery in
Hindley's "A Private Wilder-
ness" and "A Slight Silver
Hush" adds greatly to the force
of the poems, because the im-
ages are intermingled with the
poet's unknown and violent in-
ner landscape: "I screeched
with owls and stalked with
wolves / To split the uncooked
bone." He may "dance f o r a
summer in Bougival" but we see
him scrabbling for a hold on his
reality as well: "Into frozen
ground my fingers scratched for
something warm / They burst
and ran on flint."
Hindley packs his imagery
close in "A Slight Silver Hush"
but again he 1e t s his flights
mingle with his pilgrimages. He
is sometimes abrupt b u t his
t rhymes are not forced, and his
e vision often has startling beau-
ty. Peter Brett has trouble on
n ~~his escapades in "Earthquake"

because the setting and the
characters do not seem to need
each other, in fact, often inter-
fere with the unfolding of a
hesitant meeting. His Tel Aviv
does not aid h i s perceptions,
nor does it aid the reader in be-
lieving the beauty of the girl,
or the strangeness of the boy's
adventures. The setting cannot
mask the action - it must en-
hance it.
Just as setting cannot comn-
pletely carry a story, incident
cannot carry a scene or a poem.
Bandyke's "The Painter Se-
quence" is witty in a rather ob-
vious way, but thetscenes drag
a bit because of the painter's
cartoon stupidity and the pre-
dictability of the characters the
author is trying to satirize. The
best one is the first, "The Pa-
tient," because the nature of the
interaction between the woman
and the painter is sufficiently
complex to hold the reader's at-
tention. The painter is strong-
est in this scene, and his sim-
plicity does add something to
the characterization of the
green-glassed suburbanite. But
in the others he is merely a
rustic, a boor, and the conver-
sations between the women and
him lack intensity or surprise.
Barbara Haight's "Bert Lahr
at the Ypsilanti Greek Theater"
is also perhaps too simple, with
its "o1d unreasonable clowns"
and "dumb cold." The best in-
cident is James Peter's "Night
Rite," where the communality
of the wedding is shared both
by the watchers in the poem
("offering me' these watchers'
common thoughts / pinned to
your voice which is so quiet")
and the reader, through them,
"I look at stories with them." jj

Images are at the 1 as t the
most rewarding, the simple
"Train Ride" by Kirk Hampton,
faced on the opposite page by
one of Tip High's evocative
skies. David Zeltzer's calligra-
phic designs are involving, es-
pecially a very simple "sun" de-
sign which avoids the cuteness
of the "zipper" one -and works
perfectly well on the visual lev-
el. Larry Joseph's imagistic
poems, especially "T h e Water
fowl" capture the reader's in-
terest through a direct visual
commitment, swift-stroked like
haikus, rising and falling with
the movement of 'the birds wings
and the softness of its impact.

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U"..

.A

ANTHONY QUINN

GREGORY PECK

I

in
THE GUNS OF NAVARONE
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To a Gypsy Moth ... jumping isn't only a
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the meditation, a still search
without an object. Roberts'
"White Chapel Cemetery" is
pure talk and song, the collo-
quial tone and the lyric sensi-
bility never undercutting o n e
another. It might be a ballad,
but rhythms are short, spoken,
dignified in simple emotion.
The most intense stories in
this Generation are chaotic, as
with the confusions of the past
and present in Linda Ashley's
"The Way It Is" and the dream
sequence in Yukhym Pavlenko's
"The Mitre." The persona of the
one, an adolescent girl, grows
through many visions of her-
self and her sister, a steadily in-
creasing weight of memories
and unsatisfactory present en-
counters culminating in a liter-
al shutting out, a door slammed
between her and her sister, and
a figurative one, the ritual dis-
placement of the older sister at
the younger's wedding. The
pages of pure dialogue, cutting
through time and incident, but
always continuing between the
two gir'ls as they grow apart,
are both the most successful and
the most difficult to follow
writing in the story~ Pavlenko's
description is heavy and com-
plete, but the meeting w i t h
Christ is perhaps too predicta-
ble. The sick old Metropolitan,
Andre, his stalwart seminarian,
Mykola, and the mad Christ are
THURS & FRI.-NOV. 20-21
GASLIGHT
Dir. GEORGE CUKOR, 1944
Ingrid Bergman plays the
wife, Charles Boyer the
husband trying to drive
her insane in this tense
drama.
"A real gas"
7 & 9 Architecture
662 8871 Auditorium
75c

beautifully created but do no
live together comfortably in th-
story. As Christ and the Met
ropolitan approach the cave it
the old man's dream, Pavlenk
writes, "Andre, submissive nea
the womb . . ." This level o
psychological explanation in
terferes with, rather than en
hances the mystery and grand
eur of the old man's dream vis
ion.
Evocation is enough in Wil
Liam Brashler's "In Fear of Si
lent Reprisal." His theme is s
terrible, the two tapping blin
girls in the staring rooms of,
high school, that his anger an
explanations tear the girls fron
the clear
Their presence, however, was
to routine to be horrible to
any of us. They were very in-
telligent.

O
r
f
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a
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Deborah Kerr
The Gypsy M ths
a.W.Gene Hackman" Scott WilonW mW Ndom
Screenplay By William Hanley Based on a Story By James Drought
Executive Producer Edward Lewis Produced By Hal Landers and
Bobby Roberts Directed by John Frankenheimer - Metrocolor uMs
SEE IT SOON AT A THEATRE NEAR YOU!
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Delphine Seyrig seduces Leaud in
one of the most erotic, nonsex
scenes I've ever seen in a movie."

satirist aroun
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Andres Segovia, far and
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Conductor: Josef Blatt
Stage Director: Ralph Herbert
s."MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
OE +All Tickets $3.00
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Box Office open: 12:30-5:00 P.M. Nov. 17-20
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