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November 21, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-11-21

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Apollo
HOUSTON -P)-Safe in the Yankee
Clipper mothership, the Apollo 12 ex-
plorers abandoned the mooncraft Intrepid
and sent it crashing back into the moon,
a final sacrifice to man's curiousity about
the strange lunar sphere.
Lunar geologists are eager to quiz the
Apollo 12 moonwalkers about volcano-like
mounds they sighted and to examine some
ne wmoon rocks that one scientist said
will be "the prima donnas of the scientific
community."
Gary Lofgren, a moon geology expert
at the Manned Spacecraft Center, said
comments from Charles Conrad and Alan
Bean during their two moonwalks indicate
the spacemen gathered a greater variety
of rocks than the Apollo 11 crew.
"They saw a variety of rocks we did
not get from Apollo 11," he said in an
interview after the astronauts completed

12 depar
two four-hour excursions on the Ocean
of Storms.
The moon rocks from Apollo 12 should
yield great scientifc data because they
were gathered from an old crater, a
young crater and a crater in which lunar
bedrock was exposed.
"We'll get a good idea what the bedrock
is like," Lofgren said. "We haven't had
that before."
Intrepid's rockets were fired at 4:50
p.m. EST, and less than half an hour
later the little moonship smashed into
the moon's surface some 24 miles from
its former home base on the Ocean of
Storms.
The three Navy commanders, Charles
Conrad Jr., Alan L. Bean and Richard F.
Fordon Jr. displayed only passing curios-
ity about the fate of the little craft that
had carried two of them safely to the
moon and back.

s witht
It struck the moon traveling some 3,700
miles an hour.
At impact, the slight hull of Intrepid
carved out an elliptical crater on the
moon's surface about 20 feet by 40 feet,
but only 20 inches deep.
Still the shock waves rumbling through
the moon's surface provided a bench mark
for earth scientists watching readings
from ,the seisometer left on the moon's
surface by Conrad and Bean in their
31 %,z-hour expedition.
Lines on the seismic charts on earth
showed a slight wiggle at impact.
With that known reading from the
seismometer, scientists can measure the
impacts of other meteors striking the
moon, and by the same readings infer
information on the interior of the moon.
It was the last major experiment in a
long day that included Conrad and Bean
blasting off from the moon in Intrepid,

easures
the end of their lunar scouting, and final-
ly docking with the Yankee Clipper.
"We're in. Stable as a rock!" Charles
Conrad Jr. exclaimed as the two ships
hooked up nose-to-nose at 12:58 p.m.
EST. "Super job."
Conrad and Bean had started their day
on a geological field trip near their base
on the Ocean of Storms. During a four-
hour trek they gathered a treasure chest
of rocks for scientists and clipped off
parts of a Surveyor spacecraft which had
landed on the moon 2/2 years ago.
Everywhere they went, the moon ex-
plorers left something behind. On the
moon's surface they left litter that cost
millions of dollars.
The scientific instruments alone, meas-
uring impacts on the lunar soil, the
tenuous lunar atmosphere, and the flow-
ing solar wind blown out by the sun, cost
some $25 million.

NEWS PHONE:
three764-0552
Friday, November 21, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

Pentagon
January4

decreases
Eraft quota

ARAB GUERRILLAS and Lebanese troops waged a gun battle
in southern Lebanon yesterday shattering the calm restored ear-
lier this month.
The fighting was the first major clash between the guerrillas and
the army since a secret peace agreement was negotiated in Cairo
Nov. 3.
An official Lebanese announcement said about 100 guerrillas op-
ened machine-gun fire on an army post in Nabatiyeh, 40 miles south
of Beirut. A relief force mounted a counter-attack.
Lebanon said the incident was an attempt by unnamed "suspic-
ious elements" to sabotage the Cairo agreement.
THE WHITE HOUSE reported progress in negotiations be-
tweenPresident Nixon and Japan's Prime Minister Eisaku Sato.
Negotiations focused mainly on economic problems between the
two countries. Decisions reached will be announced today.
At their Wednesday meeting, Sato and Nixon agreed on condi-
tions for continued U.S. use of Okinawa as a forward base in the
western Pacific. The island will be back in Japanese control in 1972,
Japanese and American officials reported.
* s *
THE SOUTH VIETNAMESE ARMY lost 479 troops killed in
action last week, more than four times the U.S. toll.
Allied commands say t h i s reflects Saigon's increasing combat
role. American deaths totalled 113.
South Vietnamese headquarters reported scattered fighting and
enemy shelling at two central highland Special Forces bases.
The South Vietnamese have taken heavy casualties in the past
week while fighting about 5,000 North Vietnamese near the two camps
north of Saigon.
ARMS LIMITATION TALKS between the U.S. and U.S.S.R.
continue with both sides remaining absolutely silent on matters
discussed.
The only known result of their relatively brief meetings is that
they agreed to meet again Monday.
Both U.S. and U.S.S.R. delegates to the Helsinki conference have
pledged to seek the limitation and reversal of the strategic arms race.
* * *
A BAN ON DDT use against certain pests has been ordered

WASHINGTON ( - T he
Pentagon's manpoWer c h i e f
said yesterday that the Janu-
ary draft call would, be con-
siderably below the originally
announced quota of 35,000.
Roger Kelley, assistant secre-
tary of defense, declined to give
the exact number but defense of-
ficials are planning for draft calls
next year to average about 20,800
men a month.
Drafts in the final quarter of
this year are averaging just un-
der 10,000 a month.
The lowered figures reflect the
shrinkage of U.S. armed forces
over-all made possible mainly
through the Vietnam pullouts.
The Nixon administration has
reported redeployments of 60,000
men from Vietnam are d u e by
mid-December. Further m a n-
power cutbacks are under con-
sideration.
Also helping to lower draft calls
has been a satisfactory r a t e of
volunteer enlistments by A r m y
recruiters.
Meanwhile, 35 congressmen In a
letter to President Nixon urged
that all draft calls be suspended
until the new lottery system can
be implemented.
Calling the present system un-
fair, 29 Democratic and six Re-
publican members of the House
rwrote : "With both House and
Senate having acted, it would be a
tragedy to subject one more man
to an inequitable draft under the
old system."
As a result of Senate approval
of draft legislation, Kelley said the
SelectiveiService can begin con-
everting its records to summon
men on a random-date selection
process in January instead of on
the current oldest-first basis.
This switchover process, Kelley
said, will be helped along by the
fact that January's draft "will be
very much lower" than previously
a estimated.
Kelley, describing the new
method, estimated that under
random selection a draft-eligible
young man's chances of being
called to duty in 1970 will be about
one in four.
1 Under the system, he explained,
a man's birthday will be the key
to his likelihood of being tabbed.

Sen. Mike Mansfield: Still uncommitted
Haynsworth decision
today; still a toss-up

by the President's Environmental Quality Council.
The ban, based on the possible harmful effects of this pesticide, WASHINGTON (,)-Two more
involves about 35 per cent of the total DDT used in this country - senators declared themselves yes-
some 14 million pounds, terday-one for and one against
The council also announced it plans to cancel all other DDT the Supreme Court nomination of
uses, except for emergency control of diseases and massive crop pest Clement F. Haynsworth Jr. But
infestations by Dec. 31, 1970. the outcome continued to rest with
3members whose positions may not
It called for comment within 90 days on this intention, bers utlse ois alled
* *be known until the roll is called

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A DEMOCRATIC PARTY reform commission has voted to
require states to allocate delegates to future national conventions
on the basis of population and Democratic strength in the most
reent presidential vote.
The "one Democrat, one vote" principle is designed to assure that
apportionment of delegates within a state will more accurately reflect
its political makeup than has been true in the past.
Thus, a state which elects convention delegates by congressional
districts could not give each district the same number of delegates
but would give more to those which four years previously had cast

today.
Republican Charles Mathias of
Maryland, calling it one of the
hardest decisions he has had to
make in nine years in Congress,
said he will oppose the nomina-
tion.
Democrat Jennings Randolph of
West Virginia said he will vote to
confirm because h e believes
Haynsworth would serve on the

Hugh Scott of Pennsylvania, most
prominent Republican among the
uncommitted, says he made up
his mind several weeks ago but
has told no one.
"This is the hardest vote I have
ever had to cast," he says.
Scott denied that there has
been any pressure on him from the
White House or any administra-
tion officials. But another of the
uncommitted Republicans made
the first public report of a threat
to influence his vote.
Sen. Mark Hatfield of Oregon
said he received a telephone call
earlier in the day from a good
friend who reported a number of
former financial supporters were
saying "a vote against Hayns-
worth can become the trigger to
set up a conservative candidate
against me in the 1972 primary.
Both Scott and Majority Leader
Mike Mansfield of Montana, who
also remained uncommitted, said
they expect all members to be
present for the vote.
Mansfield said he still rates the
outcome a toss-up.

I

peseno

5 GREAT PLAYS!
0
2 Performances Each
FRI.4AT., JADE. 23-24
"A REAL TIUMPH"-.
BEST PLAY
RseNCR
rNd ulludeNtRx
*A-eed

T*S: WED., Ff3. 24-25
MILER'SI

a larger Democratic presidential vote. court with "fidelity, high- purpose
Another. party reform group will consider how the votes of the and compassion."
JOSEPH P. KENNEDY was buried yesterday after a funeral The declarations brought to 45
the number of senators publicly
service in Hyannis, Mass., not far from the family compound on committed to vote for confirma-
Cape Cod. tion, according to an Associated
The service included a eulogy by his son, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy Press poll.
(D-Mass) and the recitation of the 23rd Psalm by his grandson, John The AP poll showed 42 com-
F. Kennedy, Jr. mitted to vote against Haynsworth
The former ambassador to Britain was buried in Brookline, Mass. and 13 undecided. GOP Leader

ri
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i,:
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The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session publshed Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

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Friday night
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Afternoon I
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SHOWS AT:
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RICHARD GOLDSTEIN. N.Y. TIMES
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"WILL KNOCK YOU OUT OF YOUR SEAT!"
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