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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, November 19, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, November 19, 1969

Cagers
By PHIL HERTZ
While the attention of the
sports fans on campus has beei
directed at Coach Bo Schem-
bechler's Wolverines' charge for
the Roses, basketball c o a c h
Johnny Orr has quietly been
preparing his charges for their
takeover of the sports scene.
Monday the cagers will at least
begin to assume their share of
the spotlight when they take on
the Michigan freshmen team at
8 p.m. in the Events Building.
The game is the first in a 25
.game schedule, which includes
thirteen home contests, but does
not have the Wolverines partici-
pating in a holiday tournament.
The early season independent
schedule, including such na-
tional cage powers as N o t r e
Dame, Davidson, Marquette,
Duke, and Princeton, will pro-
vide a severe test for the Wol-
verines. Assistant coach F r e d
Snowden, however, says, "T h e
tough schedule may be to our
advantage, we'll improve as the
season progresses, and may help
us during the Big Ten sched-
ule."
Orr agreed with the assessment
of the schedule, calling it, "One

brace.
of the toughest in the nation,
but we would not have schedul-
ed those teams if we didn't think
we could beat them."
Besides the schedule, O r r
and Snowden have two major
problems staring them in the
face. One is replacing the de-
parting Dennis Stewart, K e n
Maxey, Bob Sullivan, Willie Ed-
wards, and Dave McClellan. The
other is overcoming the Wolver-
ines' lack of height. The only
Wolverines over six-foot-five
are Captain Rudy Tomjanovich
and Sophomore Ernie Magri,
and the latter is not expected to
see much action.
Tomjanovich, the six-foot sev-
en All-American out of Ham-
tramck, is expected to be the
key to the Wolverines' success
this season. The Big Ten's lead-
ing rebounder in 1969 will oper-
ate out of one forward position
where he will be flanked by
either Richard 'Bird' Carter or
junior college transfer Harry
Hayward.
Carter, who was a starter ear-
ly last season for the Wolver-
ines, is expected to see action at
both forward and guard. T h e
six-foot-four Hayward is a

for ba(
strong rebounder, who according
to Snowden "has demonstrated
outstanding defensive ability and
great quickness for his size."
Another player who will see con-
siderable action up front for the
Wolverines is senior Bill Frau-
mann, who has been outstand-
ing in fall practice. Sophomores
Wayne Grabiec and Matt An-
derson are also expected to see
action at the forward spots
The current favorite to oper-
ate the Wolverine pivot position
is Rodney Ford, a six-foot five
junior, who started a couple of
games for the Wolverines 1 a s t
season. Snowden calls Ford
"... extremely quick. He's a fine

k-breaking schedule

rebounder and is tremendous on
defense." Fraumann also may
see action in the pivot.
The starting backcourt posi-
tions will be manned by return-
ing first stringer Dan Fife and
senior Mary Henry. As a sopho-
more, Fife was the number three
scorer for the Wolverines behind
Tomjanovich a n d Stewart.
Snowden expects Henry to be
a stabilizing factor" for the
team.
Senior Rick Bloodworth and
Sophomore Dave Hart will un-
doubtedly see considerable ac-
tion at the guard positions.
Snowden termed Bloodworth

"the second best offensive play-.
er on the squad after Tomjano-
vich," and added, "We are hop-
ing for great things from him."
Hart seemed to excite Snow-
den as much as any player on
the team. The Michigan assist-
ant coach called the five-foot
eight guard, "the little dyna-
mo." He added that he expects
Hart to be at least the third
guard, and says the former Yp-
silanti star will become "The
People's Choice" because of his
small size and hustle.
Another sophomore, Lamont
King, may be able to aid the
Wolevrine guards if he can
conquer scholastic difficulties,

which will keep him ineligible
through January 8th.
Snowden summed up, "We
think we'll be exciting because
of our lack of size, which will
force us to make defensive ad-
justments for taller teams.
"We still think we can be ef-
fective because of our speed and
quickness, we're going to be the
'Go-Go Wolverines.'"
Head coach Orr also indicated
confidence in his team's ability.
"I think we've improved on de-
fense over last year and we're a
quick and agile team." Orr,
however, did add, "Our only real
weakness is size," and that, fans,
may be the rub.

KIRK ON BRIDGE:
Abortive overcall assures slam contract

TEACH ING FELLOWS
YOU MUST SIGN
A Petition to have a
Teaching Fellows Union
See your Dept. Rep. or Call 763-1334,
ask for PAUL GINGRICH

By LEE KIRK
Daily Bridge Editor
There are good overcalls, bad
overcalls, and downright stupid
ones. In today's hand, an utterly
atrocious overcall turned out to be
the light in the wilderness t h a t
guided declarer along the road and
allowed him to bring home a dif-
ficult slan.
Today's hand was played by
Richard Glatzu of West Quad at
the Union duplicate bridge tour-
nament earlier this year. His part-
nership had been having only
moderate success and they were
starting to bid aggressively when
this hand popped up.
After South's opening one spade1
bid, West, for reasons that willj
never be known, decided to chirp
in with two hearts. East made a
good two no-trump bid, and aftert

his partner bid clubs, set off on clubs aid spades, certain that West was reduced to the ten
the road to slam. West had started with six hearts and nine of hearts and the king
His skip to four no-trump was and two diamonds. He almost cer- and eight of diamonds, and he
perhaps a trifle optimistic, for FORTH could afford to part with neither
there was certainly no guarantee N-4 3of them. If he jettisoned a dia-
that his partner had all three -A-43mond, South would play to drop
missing aces, and other missing N-K 3 2 his king, and if he pitched a heart,
honors were certain to be behind *-10 9 6 3 the three of hearts would be set
whatever aces South had. Even if 4A K Q 9 up. Never underestimate the pow-
South had shown up with two WEST EAST er of a three.
aces, North would have had no 4-K J 8 A-7 6 2
recourse but to bid six clubs. IV-J 10 9 7 5 4 V-Q 6 If East opens a heart, t h e
C squeeze is killed, but the hand can
Happily, South conveniently had *-K 8 --J 7 5 4 2 still be made. Declarer must pull
all three aces, and the club slam 4-10 5 4-6 3 2 two rounds of clubs and trump out
was bid and West led a small club. SOUTH the heart loser. Then he takes the
Declarer took it on the board and-A Q 10 9 spade hook and East is in with
led a spade and finessed with the i--A 8 the jack.

ten. West was in with the jack
and returned a heart to the ace.
South then took the ace of spades
and roughed a spade on the board,
happily noting the fall of the king
from West.
South ran off his winners inE

f--A Q
41-J8 7 4

SOUTH
1 spade
3 clubs
5 spades

WE ST
2 hearts
Pass
Pass

NORTH EAST
2 NT Pass
4 NT Pass
6 clubs All pass

_-

: : . ;a
_____ _

rI

Opening lead- five of clubs

FOR UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN STUDENTS, FACULTY AND STAFF
TUE R0SE BOWL Super TOu

-11I

101

tainly had to have the king of
diamonds for his overcall, and if
he did, he would be squeezed on
the tenth trick. That's exactly
how it worked out.
THAT
DOG
ON
WHEELS
IS
COMING
- - - --E -

West's best reurn is a heart.
As the cards lie, the contract is
cold, but if East has three clubs
to the ten, the contract can be
set. To do this, East must sluff a
spade on the third heart lead.
After West gets in and leads the
heart, East must overtrump if de-
clarer plays the nine from dummy
and sluff his last spade if declar-
er sluffs or plays the club queen,
South will then be unable to set
up his spades without giving the
club ten a trick.
The fact that the hand could be
made no matter what does not ex-
cuse West's anemic overcall. The
information he gave was vital.
South was quided away from the
more routine play of taking finess-
es in both diamonds and spades
by West's bid and was able to con-
i ur up an image of the opponent's
cards and bring home the slam.

Against
Th4e Wa/I
The black athletes ...
.. .an old battle starts new
By ERIC SIEGEL
IT IS NOW a little over a year since Tommie Smith and John
' Carlos, a pair of black sprinters from San Jose State College,
showed the world that they are men as well as athletes.
For those who have forgotten, the date was October 17,
1968. Smith, who had just set a new world's record in the 200
meter run, and Carlos, who had finished third in that same
race, used the occasion of their Olympic awards ceremony to
stage a symbolic protest against racial discrimination in the
United States.
The two sprinters stood on the platform in Mexico City
wearing black socks. In addition, each wore a single black glove
-Carlos on his right hand, Smith on his left. When the playing
of the National Anthem began, Smith and Carlos both lowered
their heads and raised their clenched fists high into the after-
noon sky.
The publicity given the actions of these two black men, who
refused to be honored by the officials in Mexico City when they
and their fellow blacks were humbled by the white power struc-
ture in America, was widespread; the reaction to their symbolic
protest was swift. On October 18, the US Olympic Committee, af-
ter meeting for more than five hours, issued a statement apolo-
gizing to the International Olympic Committee for the actions
of conscience taken by Carlos and Smith.
THE NEXT DAY, Carlos and Smith were suspended from
the team. At the same time, a boycott by the rest of the black
athletes on the US squad failed to materialize, and the Olympic
Games continued quietly, with the US winning more than its
share of team medals, and the blacks winning more than their
share of individual honors.
The "incident," as the symbolic action was later labeled by
Olympic officials, is still not forgotten by the hierarchy of the
IOC. Last week, Avery Brundage, the 82-year old president of
the IOC, perhaps taking his cue from Spiro Agnew, declared
that any country entering athletes likely to stage political dem-
onstrations at the 1972 Olympics should be censured.
Implicit in Brundage's statement is his notion that political
protests at future athletic events, including the Olympics, are
a distinct possibility. And this notion is understandable, even as
his desire to avoid and surpress such protests is to be deplored.
It seems clear that Brundage's words were intended, to a
large degree, for the US Olympic Committee. To Brundage, as
well as to many other observers, this year is The Year of the
Black Athlete in America.
This characterization does not apply to the performance of
the black athlete, which has always been good, but to his new-
found willingness to stand up, on the field and off it, and be
counted as a man, as well as an athlete. This willingness is dis-
turbing to those who, in the words of Carlos, see the black ath-
lete as a "showhorse," rather than as a human being.
FIRST AT IOWA and Oregon State last spring, then at
Wyoming and Washington and Indiana and Minnesota this fall,
the black athlete has shown his contempt for the dual standards
of the sports world, which treats him as an equal on the field,
but gives him second-class citizenship off it.
That protests by black athletes have struck only a handful
of schools thus far offers little comfort to coaches and athletic
directors who realize it might strike many more.
A few of the more enlightened coaches seem to realize the
complexity of the problem and understand the depths of the
black athletes' grievances. Penn State's Joe Paterno, for exam-
ple, was quoted by the Associated Press, "There isn't any place
in the country where black athletes have as many things avail-
able to them as whites." And UCLA's Tommy Prothro told the
same news service, "We know there is a natural situation of rac-
ial tension." Prothro then went on to say, "It's bad for the game,
the coaches and the players, black and white, to let the player-
coach relationship disintegrate into a racial thing."
Here at Michigan, the consensus among players and coach-
es seems to be that morale is high on all the teams, and that
good communication exists between the coaches and all the ath-
letes. No-one, however, seems to be taking an It-Can't-Happen-
Here hard line.
STILL, THERE ARE several coaches a n d administrators
across the country who express varying degrees of bewilderment
at the recent actions taken by black athletes at these handful
of schools. They seem unable to understand why black athletes
would protest.
This attitude I find difficult to understand. For the actions

of the black athletes at a few schools this year, like the actions
of Smith and Carlos at the 1968 Olympics, are really nothing
new. Rather, these actions are a continuation of the age-old
struggle of oppressed and mis-treated groups to stand up and
assert themselves and tell the world "That's enough."
As John Carlos said in Mexico City 13 months ago today,
"The clenched fist symbolizes that the black man is coming rap-
idly together."
V OF MICHIGAN

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MASOPUST

Professor of Legal Philosophy and Political Science
Faculty of Law

Charles University, Prague
On
'Concepts of a New Political System
11-.3C .Iut"O1ainia 1QEIW' ,

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