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November 19, 1969 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-11-19

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Wednesday, November 19, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

I - - - - - -I I I - I

f

Ohioan

Cur

By TERRI FOUCHEY
As a high school football player,
Tom Curtis never had any dreams
of wearing the scarlet and. gray of
the monsters from Columbus'
midway. He explains why he told
Woody no when he called, "I was
a quarterback in high school and
since quarterbacks at Ohio State
used to be so anonymous I never
wanted to go there."
Rex Kern has obviously been
able to overcome the problem of
anonymity that plagued Buckeyet
quarterbacks. With his passingthet
has broken records and from the
traditional mold picturing an OSU
quarterback as someone who just
hands off to assorted runners.
Perhaps on Saturday his passing
will enable Curtis to enter hisc
name into the record books. i
To do this, Kern would have tot
make a mistake and throw an in-1
terception. Curtis would then havei
to supply a runback of sevenyardst
to break the NCAA career returnt
record. Curtis comments on this
possibility, "Sure, I'd like to get1
an interception off him, but it'st
more important to win the game
first."3
A native Ohioan, Curtis findsi
that he has a little more innert
feeling about playing Ohio Statet

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
JOE MARKER

A 0
tis aims for re
either side in his position he has he feels, were Iowa and Purdue,
more freedom to move where he j("where we put it all together."
wants. This freedom allows him He remembers the Indiana game
to put on a double coverage more of last year as the best in his ca-
often and this is where the chanc- reer. He had 11 unassisted tackles
es for interceptions are increas- and managed to ntercept two Har-
ed. "In a double coverage situa- ry Gonso passes in that game.
tion," he explains, "one of us has Curtis looks forward to contin-
the receiver man to man and the uing his larcenous ways in the
other is free to go for the ball." pros. He doesn't have any parti-
The hardest play to defense is cular team he'd like to be drafted
the draw as far as he is concern- by but he adds, "I hope it's on the
ed. "Everybody is playing a pass West Coast or Florida because I'd
and that creates a hole in t h e like to get away from the c o 1 d
# middle because the linebackers are weather."
back on pass coverage. No one is He would continue to play safety
ready for the run and that's why because he doesn't feel he's fast
it usually works." enough for the Mcornerback posi-
The best team games this year,
G .
Pro H GritddeI
Standings

,cor
tion, He explains how he views the
position, "Speed doesn't m e a n
that much. Reaction to the quar-
terback is the most important part
of pass defense."
Like most athletes Curtis h a s
certain superstitions which he fol-
lows before games. One of his is
the fact that he never changes his
practice pants unless the team has
lost the week before. Last year all
during fall practice before the
first game he wore the same pair
of pants. The week before t h e
California game they got to the
point where they were very dirty
and smelly.

but that "it's just morei
to beat them."

reason

-Daily--JayiCassidy
MICHIGAN'S TOM CURTIS (25), the Big Ten's master of the pass interception, readies to pick off
an errant enemy aerial in an early-season encounter with Washington. Right beside Curtis is Barry
Pierson, who along with Curtis make the Michigan secondary one of the league's toughest to penetrate.

He adds, "I think we have a
good chance of beating them. We
know they can't humiliate us like
they did last year."
Curtis feels it will take a great
effort to win but that the team
is capable of it. "We're much bet-
ter against the run than we were
last year. They're going to try to
run it right down our throats and
that's where we have to stop
them."
For the past two seasons CurtiE
has led the Big Ten in.intercep-
tions and he has managed to
snare six enemy aerials so far this
year. His method for getting an
interception is simple. "I watch
the quarterback's eyes because
they tell where he's going to
throw and the rest is luck."
With the addition of a Wolf-
back in the defense this year, Cur-
tis was switched to the position of
free safety. In a zone defense when
the linebackers come back to help
with pass defense he covers his
zone and then goes to the side
the play is coming to. For man tc
man coverage he is responsible for
the back coming out of the back-
field.
Since he hasn't been assigned tc

Pickings

7?
!
1
3
S
I
1
7
f
1
S
5
C

New York
Baltimore
Milwaukee
Philadelphi
Cincinnati
Detroit
Boston
Atlanta
Los Angele,
Chicago
Phoenix
San Franci

NBA
Eastern Division
W L
18 1
10 7
a 6 10
6 10
6 10
4 11
Western Division
12 5
8 87
98
7 9

Pct.
.947
.625
.588
.375
.375
.375
.267
.706
.533
.529
.438
.400

GB
7
10%4
li 0
10V2
12
3
3
41,
5

Well gang, it's almost over. This is your last chance to win your-
self a scrumptious Cottage Inn at the expense of The Daily. No more
anxious waiting for the Sunday Daily to see how you did on your
Gridde Pickings. No more tales of the daring exploits of the famed
Revolutionary Vanguard Elite. No more stories of the powerful man-
eating, ground gobbling Daily Libels trampling their hopeless op-
ponents on their march to the national championship.
So enjoy it while you can. Submit this weeks picks, the last till
next September, to The Daily office by midnight Friday, the eve of
the Big Ten championship game between Bo's boys and Fat-boy
Hayes' fops. It's your last chance to join the immortal ranks of Daily
pizza pickers.
To aid you prospective pickers, one of The. Daily's intrepid re-
porters managed to infiltrate the ranks of Buckeye gridders long
enough to get the picks of one of their illustrious(?) number. This
week's guest selector is none other than Jim Coburn, third string
Ohio State fullback who, after a phenomenal senior year in high school
when he gained 1327 yards, has seen eighteen minutes of action in
his two fabulous seasons under the fat-boy, garnering a 4 yard average.
The powerful Buckeye's picks appear below.

I

sco

6 9

DON SCARLET AND GRAY.

sr
|St

Buckeye hues psyche up Gridders

an Diego 5 9 .357 51
eattle 5 10 .333 6
Yesterday's Results
Boston 120, Phoenix 119
Los Angeles 125, Detroit 114 (o.t.)
New York 112, Cincinnati 94
Chicago 127, [ hiladelphia 119
San Diego at Baltimore, inc.
Milwaukee at San Francisco, inc.
Today's Games
Chicago at Boston
Los Angeles at Cincinnati
Phoenix vs. Baltimore at Philadelphia
San Diego at Philadelphia
Atlanta at Seattle

f

By CHRIS TERAS

player represented. The number

The last time it happened Mich- raised a few questions as to its
igan lost. significance.
For the second time this season, The mystery was not cleared up
Coach Bo Schembechler outfitted at all, though by querying Schem-
the freshmen in the opposing bechler. "I just have no idea at
team's colors during yesterday's all," he smiled slyly. "Maybe it's
practice. The last time he did the size of the jersey."
this, Michigan State was the op- When it was pointed out to him
ponent - the following Saturday that Ohio State ran up 50 points
the Wolverines play what Schem- against Michigan at Columbus last
bechler after called "our w o r s t year, Schembechler thought noth-
game of the season." ing of it. "Oh yeah? he said. "How
Maybe white jersies with r e d about that?"
numerals are luckier than green So the outside world must as-
jersies with white numerals. In sume that the little "50" is merely
any case, Schembechler is taking a psychological move to fire up the
no chances on his players forget- boys, who are in top physical con-
ting the significance of Saturday's dition for tile latest edition in the
contest. Ohio-Michigan grid series.
Every white jersey had a little As if they needed it.
"50" on the front just above the The rain never let up during
regular number of the Ohio State the workout, but it appeared that

not even the hardest downpour in
the world could have dampened
the Wolverine's spirits. No foreign
observer would have known that
yesterday was one of the last mo-
ments of endless drudgery before
the merciful conclusion to a long
regular season.
Every player seemed to give that
little extra. He threw that should-
er block with just that much more
vigor, he strained to get that extra
half-step allowing him to turn the
corner, or he fired across the line
of scrimmage so fast that t h e
white-shirted quartei'back barely
had time to take the center snap
before he was overwhelmed by a
blue-shirted wave.
Schembechler probably n o t e d
all this, too, because he called a
halt to practice 15 minutes before
the usual 6:00 p.m. quitting time.

He was also wet, but would n o t
admit that this had anything to
do with his decision.
He was, however, concerned that
the wet conditions of the la s t
two days would hurt game pre-
parations. "One day like this," he
said, "and it wouldn't bother us
too much, but two days of h a r d
rain is going to have an effect.
You just can't get as much done."
Part of the reason is that con-
ditions were such that on almost
every play, people would slip on
pass patterns, or pitchouts would
slither off a back's hands. As a
result, the plays weren't run
through as sharply as they would
have been on a drier day.
But Schembechler wasn't too
worried about all the dropped'
balls themselves. He said, "It
would be different in a game -
they keep the balls a lot drier."
The only apparent change In
practice plans was that B illy
Taylor was running with the se-
cond team offense for a while. He
was playing fullback, and behind
him at tailback was none other

AP GRID BALLOTING:
Wolverines rise to twelfth;
Bucks perched at poii lop

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.

OHIO STATE at Michigan
PURDUE at Indiana}
IOWA at Illinois
MSU at Northwestern
Wisconsin at MINNESOTA
Air Force at NOTRE DAME
COLORADO STATE at Ari-
zona State
UCLA at SOUTHERN CAL
UTAH at Brigham Young
COLUMBIA at Brown
California at STANFORD

12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

SMU at Baylor
Colorado at KANSAS STATE
DARTMOUTH at Princeton
North Carolina State at
FLORIDA STATE
Harvard at YALE
OKLAHOMA STATE at Iowa
State
Virginia at MARYLAND
Nebraska at OKLAHOMA
OHIO STATE RUGBY at
Michigan Rugby

FINANCIAL BOONDOGGLE:
Buckeye grid finances in red

By The Associated Press
Michigan's Wolverines, by virtue
of their 51-6 whipping of Iowva's
Hawkeyes Saturday, jumped from
14th to 12th place in the As-
sociated Press college football poll
yesterday.
Only brutish Ohio State and
Texas' bull-strong Longhorns
maintained their status, finishing
one-two respectively, while the
rest of the nation's Top Twenty
scattered like beserk dice in the
season's biggest shakeup.
Ohio State, a convincing 42-14
winner over stylish Purdue in their
Big Ten showdown Saturday, cor-
ralled 31 firstplace votes and 736
points over-all from a national
panel of sports writers and sports-
casters.
Texas, which stampeded Texas
Christian, 69-7, collected seven
first-place ballots and 688 points.

1.
2.
3..
4.
5.
6.
7'
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

THE TOP TWENTY
Ohio State 31 8-0
Texas 7 8-0
Arkansas 8-0
Penn St. 1 8-0
Southern Cal 8-0-1
UCLA 8-0-1
Missouri 8-1
Notre Dame . 6-1-1
Tennessee 7-1
Louisiana St. 8-1
Auburn 7-2
MICHIGAN 7-2
Mississippi 6-3
Stanford 6-2-1
Florida 7-1-1
Nebraska 7-2
Purdue 7-2
West Virginia 8-1
Houston 7-2
Toledo 9-0

736
688
556
544
416
360
352
294
249
240
214
119
110
88
67
43
37
29
20
6

Tennessee tumbled from third
to ninth after dropping a 38-0
stunner to Mississippi, and a pack
of teams moved up a notch in the
jumbled Top Ten after weekend
successes.

Sex, Sludents, and The New Moralily
Book Review and Discussion. Open to all interested persons.
TOMORROW -7:30
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH, State and Huron,
Pine Room (Basement)
"TOWARD A CHRISTIAN UNDERSTANDING OF
THE HOMOSEXUAL" (JONES)
"Careful study can erase centuries of ignorance, prejudice, con-
demnation, and persecution which have characterized the Chris-
tian community's past handling of homosexuality." (Pastoral
Psychologv)
Reviewer-LLOYD W. PUTNA, Actinq Director
Sponsored by the Office of Religious Affairs,
764-7442 2282 SAB

COLUMBUS, Ohio /P-It cost plained Bernard. "A university at- conscious Southeastern and South- than Glenn Doughty. This is the
$10,000 a year to put shoes on tempting to keep pace in a major west Conferences. same setup that proved to be suc-
Ohio State's champion football conference must put seven or eight Financial difficulties forced cessful in the second half at Iowa
team and the annual telephone men on the road. They visit fam- Dam this weekito bred after regular fullback Garvie
bill in the past decade hs jumped ilies of prospects, entertain, in- a -45-yeart Dame this week break Craw had gone out with an ankle
from $7,000 to $23,000. vite visits to the campus. 4d-year tradition and accept a injury.
bid to the Cotton Bowl.
These are just a couple of the "Transportation fares are up. The drain has become so severe Will Schembechler make a sur-
incidental expenses in the making Hotel accommodations are twice that many college administrators prise move and start Taylor at
and sustaining of a big time col- and three times what they once re gng codeemadmsistre-s urisamkeandgtat Tayloak
lege power. The Buckeyes expect were. In some places, you can't are urging a de-emphasis--the re- fullback and Doughty at tailback?
to go in the red as much as a get a good dinner for less than turn of one-platoon football and Since he refuses to answer the
quaiterof miliondolarsthi toagreements to cut down on recruit-
quarter of a m illiondllars athis 750 to $.00,nerquestisonhnhe ewo0rld willhave t
$7.50 $9.00. ~ing. The matter will be weighed atqusintewrd ilhaeo
year. "The question is how many of the annual National Collegiate wait until 1:15 p.m. Saturday,{
"For years we were able to us can maintain the current pace." Athletic Association convention at Nov. 22, to find out.
operate within our budget, but Skyrocketing costs are plaguing Washington, D.C., in January. Only then will the people wear-
in the last two or three years we teams from the effete Ivy League
have been forced to dip into our to the booming Pacific Coast and The alternative could be athletic ing those white jersies with red
reserve capital," E. E. Bernard, from the Middle West to the bowl- I bankruptcy. numerals be the real thing.
Ohio State business manager, said - - - -- ---
yesterday. "Expenses are going out
of sight."
The Buckeyes' plight, despite con-
tinuing success on the field and
:ell-out gates, is typical of the K~
financial Sque eze being experienced
by college athletic departments
thlroughout the country
"Recruiting is a big factor," ex-

Paul Vilandr6
got his MBA in 1968,
then joined IBM.

that a given variable in the mix will or
won't turn out as predicted."
Recommendations to management
The payoff for Paul comes when,
on the basis of his analysis, he makes a
"hard" financial recommendation
to management. "It's pretty tricky," he
says, "to forecast the price of computer
systems that may not even be on the
market for another five or ten years.
But that's what I do.
"Risk analysis isn't foolproof. It
involves probabilities-not certainties.
But probabillties.are better than
guesswork. Especially when you're
dealing with multimillion-dollar
computer systems."
An Equal Opportunity Employer
IBM

TH
$
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It's the lowest round-trip air
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Luxembourg in the heart of
Europe. Daily departures.
No group restrictions. Just
spend 22 days or more in
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NOW.
To: ICELANDIC AIRLINES
630 Fifth Ave. (Rockefeller Center).
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Please send descriptive Folder CN.
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I I

Paul is a financial analyst with IBM.
His job: pricing computer systems now
under development for the 1970's.
Predicting the unpredictable
He analyzes all the variables that
affect the planning, development and
marketing strategy of a computer
system."I deal with over 20 key
variables that constantly change and
interact," says Paul.
"Basically, I use a System/360
time-sharing computer and risk
analysis concepts to figure the odds

"I'mprice-tagging computers for the 1970's:'

Choose a look.
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the floating heads are 18 self-sharpening blades that //
shave as close or closer than a blade every day. With-
out nicks or cuts. The Norelco unique rotary action
keeps the blades sharp while it strokes off whiskers.
Every time you shave.

f

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