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November 15, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-11-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Xi'IVS PHONE: 764-0552
BUI SNESS PHONE: 764-04554

Saturday, November 15, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three
PRAISES T.V. BLAST

ALAN LADD
SHANE
SEE THE FORCES OF GOOD BATTLE THE FORCES OF
EVIL EVEN IF YOU DON'T GO TO WASHINGTON
PLUS
RONALD RAYGUN
in
REAR GUNNER

FCC head backs Agnew

IT'S ALL GREEK TO ME.
NOVEMBER 14-15

Spiro Aqnew

Fri.-Sat., 7:00-9:15

Aud. A

75c (Peanuts)

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 15
ALFRED HITCHCOCK FESTIVAL
3 z
A film which wHIl make you shiver when you feed
your pet canary. IN COLOR with ROD TAYLOR and
TIPPI H EDREN.
"The basic appeal to me is that it had to cdo with
ordinary, everyday birds.' -.A Hitchcc
7&9 ARCHITECTURE
662-8871 75c AUDITORIUM

Daily-RanidEdmnonds
P~rospective I11lrsI c , 1 nd(il e the 1lona bus ride to W ashillgtoll

leave
By CRI STEELE
Special To The Daily
WASHINGTON --- The buss's
were massed silently, red lights
shining back to the Events Bldg.
spectral glow, waiting for their
load of marchers. Although
Thursday evening had progress-
ed well into the eight-to-ten
loading time there were no
crowds or bull-horned organiz-
ers to be seen --- just the
busses and scattering of people
wandering toward them.
But the buses turned out to
be nearly filled, and as people

he

"ound""and
protest to us,

WASHINGTON V - - Dean
Burch, newly appointed chair-
man of the Federal Commun-
ications Commission, yester-
day endorsed Vice President
Spiro T. Agnew's charges of
bias in network television
newscasts.
Burch, a Nixon appointee, said
he thought the criticisms voiced
by Agnew were thoughtful a n d
provocative.
Agnew had specifically assailed
the way network commentators
analyzed President Nixon's Nov. 3
speech to the nation on Vietnam
policy.
While the FCC does not directly
supervise the networks, it d o e s
have regulatory power because of
its control over license renewal of
broadcast stations owned by the
networks or affiliated with them.
Burch is scheduled to appear
before the Senate communications
subcommittee Dec. 1 to testify on
broadcast license renewal proce-
dlures.
Countering some congressmen's
criticisms of Agnew's speech,
Burch said, "I think it was es-
pecially noteworthy that the vice
p~resident emphasized that he vwas
not calling for government ceni-
sorship but greater public partici-
pation in examination of the net-
work's performance."
George Rommey, Secretary of
Housing and Urban Development,
agreed with Burch in an attack
yesterday on the news media in
general.
"T h e media is dominated,"
Romney said, "by t h e thought
centers of New York and Wash-
ington and by thought critics
there who are of the new cul-
ture."
However Sen. Edward M. Ken-
nedy, (D-Mass.) :tid the Agnew
speech was "an attack with the
ultimate aim of dividing thisi
country" on the issue of the Viet-
nam war.

-Associated Press

tfgnew in iDes Moines

There's a place for you,
at SOPH SHOW

walked by they were invited
quietly aboard. Buses chuffed
and farted and the mobilization
beegan.
They were nice new Grey-
hound busses with ventilation
that didn't work, seats that
made sleep impossible for all but
the totally exhausted. They
had the same old potato faced
bus drivers who usually t a k e
one to Syracuse.
And the people in the bus.
dressed for travel and standing
in thne cold for long hours, were
familiar too. Slightly more
hirsute. But only slightly
they were regular University
students --- the sort of people
one imagines when thinking of
the sort of people he goes to
school with.
But those regular people were
prepared for a pilgrimage.
Sleeping bags filled the over-
head rack and packages were
all around. But "organization"
was present, in the form of two
marshals and they wanted more
preparation.
They . passed out mimeo-
graphed sheets on every sub-
Sj act imaginable -- maps, tele-
tphone numbers, instructions and
a little prose ditty on military
research at Michigan. The
sheets said where people should
go and when and to write tele-
phone nuambers on their hands.
Thu one instruction the sheets
repeated and the marshals em-
p h a s i z e d concerned being
peaceful. "This will be a peace-
ful demonstration," they said
and resaid. And then a warning
-"There will be police agita-
tors. Isolate them. Don't allow
them to cause violence."
There were warnings as well
about how to keep things from
gatting out of hand. Marchers
were instructed to walk- -never
run. "And don't stop. If there is
a rumor that there is gas ahead
deny it--- even if it is true."
All the way to Washington
therewere strong reminders
that, a whole segment of the
country was traveling there.
Small cars passed the bus
crowded with people and piled
high in the windows with the
ubiquitous sleeping bags.
When the bus got to the first

stop, a rest plaza on the Ohio
Turnpike called Vermilion Val-
ley. the evidence of mass move-
ment became overwhelming.
Scores of busses stood outside
and waves of peace marchers
ran through scattered snowball
fights and jokes about the wea-
ther. The plaza was overrun by
a movement from across t h e
country -- everyone was on the
way to Washington.
Back on the bus conversation
began to loosen. First thoughts
turned to violence. Wotuld it be
and, if so, when and how? Most
people ruled out mass violence.
See WAR, Page 8

EsCi, constituents
discuss war issues
By hESTER PULLING
Special To The Daily
WASHINGTON - - Gripes, complaints, and criticism of Nixon's
domestic and foreign policy were hashed over yesterday at an inform-
al question-answer meeting with Rep. Marvin Esch (R-Ann Arbor)
j and his constituents at the Long-worth House Office Building.
Esch said that meeting with his constituents was part of his con-
tribution to the Nov. 14 and 15 peace demonstrations. Approximately
25 antiwar protesters of all ages attended the conference.
One major complaint was Nixon's handling of the peace march -
more explicitily the alleged scare tactics used to keep down attend-
_ance levels.

II
K_.

the
news tday
b) Th A / oilr f ii /f) and ( ClCePressServce

nquire Mendelssohn Theatre

SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MELVIN R. LAIRD forecast a
reduction in draft calls next year.
Testifying before the Senate Armed Services Committee yester-
day, Laird also said President Nixon's lottery draft plan could be ptt
into effect "by Jan. 1 or soon thereafter" if it wins expected early
congressional approval.
The' Senate committee has already given unanimous approval to
the House-passed lottery propos'Al, and the Senate is likely to com-
plete congressional action next week,
* * *
THE PENTAGON has decided to cut back sharply its con-
troversiaA C5A supertransport program.
The program, a target of congressional criticism because of spi-
raling costs, will be cut from the original objective of 120 planes to 81.
The cutback action comes as the Defense Department presses a
campaign to cut spending this year and to compress the next de-
fense budget, now being prepared for presentation to Congress in
January.
The 39 planes being dropped from the program would have furn-
ished an additional two squadrons for fast movement of heavy mill-
tary equipment to distant overseas points in crisis.
SEN. LEN JORDAN (R-Idaho) announced he will vote
Against the conformation of Clement Haynsworth to the Supreme
Court.
Jordan said Haynsworth has shown poor judgment in his outside
business activities, although he had no quarrel with his judicial philo-
sophy.
The announcement, which had been expected, confronted the
Nixon administration with the loss of another conservative GOP vote.
An Associated Press survey shows 23 senators still publicly un-
committed with 40 senators now aligned against Haynsworth and
37 supporting the nomination,
THE PHILIPPINE GOVERNMENT told the Vietnam allies
it will withdraw the 1,500 man Phillines Civic Action Group
(PHILCAG) from South Vietnam before January.
The Philippines Foreign Policy Council met yesterday with Presi-
dent Ferdinand Marcos and unanimously recommended withdrawal
of PHILCAG. The group is slated for use in rural areas in the Philip-
pines.
Sources said the withdrawal of the noncombat construction group

IA;r(g

Tickets till

show time

Bos FOWL

X189lI

INCLUDES:

Round trip jet flight

ground transportation
and lodging

Wil11cox to take
h h
Yale position
Prof. William Willcox, current-
ly chairman of the history depart-
ment, has been appointed profes-
sor of history at Yale University!
and has b e e n named editor of
Yale's Benjamin Franklin Pub--
lishing Project.
Both positions become effective
Jan. 1, 1970, according to a joint'
announcement by Henry Moe,
president of the American. Philo-!
sophical Society, and Kingman
Brewster Jr., president of Yale.
Willeox, an authority on eigh-
teenth century English l history,
joined the University faculty aF
an assistant professor of history
in 1941. He was promoted to full
'professor in 1950.

When questioned on the troop
call-up Esch said, "Any time such
a large group of people are gath-
ered it is the responsibility of the
government to make sure peace is
maintained.
"Hopefully faith will be kept on
both sides with no one provoking
a confrontation," he added.
But one member of the audience
asked, "Do all the forces in Wash-
ington show 'faith' on the Presi-'
dent's part?"
"d don't wish to pass judgment"
Esch answered.
In response to a question con-
cerning possible amnesty for draft
dodgers or persons already jailed

Phone or stop in:

1231 South University
769-6871

for draft resistance, Esch said em- will take place before Christmas.
phatically, "I do not support am- The official reason for the pullout is lack of funds. The Manila
nesty"r x Chronicle, however, quoted Foreign Office sources as saying the de-
Worried about Nixon not realiz-,
ing the strength of their beliefs cision was prompted'by a recent congressional hearing in Washington
some constituents asked, "What in which it was reported that PHILCAG was sent to Vietnam with
See ESC![, Page 8 U.S. financial assistance and was deeply involved in black marketing.

The FRIARs
"begin' ou o bened kee"
+{kq[ n AoCanCl Sano

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DIAL
8-6L416

if just may turn out to be
he Great American Movie."
Detroit Free Press (Susan Stark) July 24, 1969
i<Vaybe the greatest picture

ever filmed in America."
--.-Detroit News (Tempo)

July 31, 1969

TATE HELD OVER
0 IE . M6th Week.
Program Information 662-6264
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