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October 03, 1969 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-10-03

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, October 3, 1969

Poj e Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, October 3, 1 969

u
music

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f ,w
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'7
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_," 7

shouts,

moans,

squeaks...

AUTO INSURANCE
FOR EVERYONE

" e ith lU o!'rco'4nzz-
able rh r intervals, but
Congloierations of claps, shouts,
mtoats, shreks. burps, clicks,
bangms, s0uawk spurks, yelps,
thumips, coghs, ain hiccoughs
Suc~h a1 di 5paraingt descii-
titi ol contemporary music
might ve I m ai e - ntrails
of an4o. wo1e, t spart
of a hinu conspiricy to un-
dermine art. Bi it drew only
laughter from the enthusiastic
audience gathered in Rackhan
Lectur( H all last S a tu r d a y
niglht for th e hirst Contemupor-
ary Directions COncert of the
1969-70 season.
The unknown critic's a 1 r
quoted at the top was air d in

William Albright's theater spec-
taclei BeuLhiand Rag, the pro-
gram's grand finale. This fan-
tastical combination of dispar-
ate ehements, which included an
actor, jazz ensemble, live elec-
tronic modulation of sound,
electronic tape, nature slides,
and even a Mickey Mouse flick,
was an evocative tour de force
that conjured up an incred-
b rmn of reactions in the
Bsides ihis, Albright's psycho-
ensua ge(ticulation not merely
implied but embodied an im-
portant esthetic point: that the
most vital art is invariably an
attempt to o approach totally in-
novative se-epression.
This stance is applicable not
only to most of the works on the

t1e Funny Girl

By GOR MAN T:AVUCAMP
Back i ti 40's and 50's the
big studios use to churn out
films about faious people-
Chonin. Maamte Curie Mata
Hai, that sort fi thing. The
genre dwtndh d somwhlat in the0
buta rash of
silerscreen bographies ave
turned up at the local lBijeaux
Two currntl on display in
Amn Arbor ate dora 1or The
hive ieol as it has been
mnure : xuly rechristened .
bae on t e of La Dun-
can,. Ia reem I(ancer, and F un-
ny Grllie arvlousSris
of iiiiiQIs: tiiri f he in s
Tis the inre amit
f teiwo fi. movit tis re-
vinutr bu gives eh Wh er
Fntixirllni sit l oFn
ny' s eary aee and iur, ll-e
:a1 mrig, dr t -
tempts nt en'.ins> thle whle\
ots ubec 'mn ainoing, hecknp-
eredn n'.te. Tin a ae ix e
7Luni v r'1 1 . I < a
fai smwat Ginoeretere f
vigntte rninutbsu he love
lie.s The episodes Iara flash
bhacks stmunt ato d urby the
aglingtace but a lb the n fie
edark.gas madeivti ihetiughtieiy
the car''in r.a hehk 9l, o
hats redm the vie T is
vieer nedrgives awhy tshe
endin.
P ONSU DER18
In ~ ~ w itDoiinlves lnyI
thn ha w se. ' he swttrer
clms memn Ioa y al

amnazng actress, beautiful, re-
sourcetul, unpredictable. As Is-
adora, she dances down life's
road from the dewy, nubile
young senisation of the 90's to
the jaded, haggard (somewhat
too haggard) institution of the
20's. At mid-point she is abso-
lutely ravishing, during her af-
fair with Paris Singer, non-
acted by Jason Robards. The
ratlr batty candor of a woman
boti revolutionary and naive is
conveyed expertly.
If ] edgrave is the better
actress, Streisand is the greater
star, th e brighest light in the
ettert annet galaxy. (If that
sounds like idolatry, it is.) From
the first moient when, swathed
it ar she crosses a bare
s lances at herself in a
irn or att smiles, "Hi-ya, gor-
geus'' he screen lights up and
"i dim r a momient. Streis-
ant, e Garo o Bergman, is
a phy,:al lci otnoii, a being
wvhose nlf'mee)presetince won a movie
screen radiates a kind of magic.
Fa rly in the film site sings a
am by tar but. io ont' knows it.''
She's only two-thirds right: we
do knowit..,
Willian Wyler, who directed
Funny Girl, was wisely content
to make it an all-Streisand
stoxv Everything in it is there
enhanee her. It is an old
fashioned, straight forward star
vehicle, but i\owwonderfully it
invtes along. Omar Sharif, as
Nick Artistehi, is pretty( "to tell
the titth, it hurts my pride; the
11 was 'pret tier than the
bride'.' Fanniy nlrients). but
lei about all. Kay Medford is
goud. as always, as Fanny's
mthtl W. Bttto repeat myself
it's all Streisand. She sings,
ste dances, she clowns, she suf-
fers and she roller skates-what
more can you ask? Few films
give such sheer, unalloyed pleas-
nr as Funny Girl does. So en-
joy. enj.
3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
en Yoilonti & Ann Arbor
NO W SHOWING
'I
tAv

program, but moreover is an
important force behind the
Contemporary Directions series
itself.
Guest composer Phil Winsor's
charming fanfare Coronation
opened and closed the concert.
Four trumpeters were placed on
stands as far apart as possible
in the lobby of Rackham, in
order to achieve natural rever-
beration. A pleasing smear of
bright sounds, particularly ef-
fective when heard from a dis-
tance, was the result.
Following inside was a rath-
er sluggish, uninspired per-
formance of a nonetheless fine
work, Anton Webern's Con-
certo. Bouguslaw Schaffer's
Imago musicae, however, was an
indisputable lemon. Pretentious,
awkward notation and a gen-
eral poverty of musical ideas in-
sured its failure, in spite of
the valiant attempts of solo
violinist Barrett Kushner and
conductor Sydney Hodkinson to
raise the work to an acceptable
level of mediocrity.
But George's Crumb's magni-
ficient Eleven Echoes of Aut-
umn 1965 wiped away any
traces of lingering dissatisfac-
tion. Here is a work that abounds
in what the layman might term
special effects" - playing on
the piano's innards, blowing
only air through the alto flut2
bowing without vibrato, bend-
ing sounds, whispering, whistl-
ing, to name but a few. And yet
these function so simply, so
directly, so beautifully, that the
same layman would be the first
to defend their organic necess-
ity. The four performers imbued
Crumb's haunting, evocative
score with a sense of breathless!
serenity.
The first performance of
George Balch Wilson's recent-
ly completed Concatenations
called for integration of electric
guitar, amplified accordion, and
percussion traps in an other-
wise conventional chamber en-
semble. Sydney Hodkinson's
able, if somewhat stiff, inter-
pretation successfully brought
out the wide-ranging emotional
content of the music. Wilson
possesses a unique ability to in-
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan. 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michian 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sy year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mal.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
ton rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.
-
TONIGHT
GOLEM
dir. PAUL WEGENER 1920
A frightening parable of
a man given the power to
create life. "Bring Your
Seat Pad"
7 & 9 ARCHITECTURE
662-8871 AUDITORIUM

still urgency into highly com-
pressed gestures and yet main-
tain an exhausting sense of ex-
pansiveness overall.
Ten years ago, it would have
been absurd to dream about
even half of a concert li k e
Saturday's, let alone a whole
series. Established musical in-
stitutions showed no interest
whatsoever in financing pro-
grams of new music. Their bag
was and is to remain within the
proven safe confines of predict-
able classical and romantic
warhorse programming.
But two young American com-
posers, George Balch Wilson and
Salvatore Martirano, had dif-
ferent ideas when they met in
the romantic Italian fishing vil-
lage of Erchia in 1959. With the
spiritual aid of Vino Brolio,
these young artists decided that
the complete lack of perform-
ance outlet for contemporary
music was no longer tolerable.
The time had come for drastic
action by composers themselves.
When Wilson returned to
Ann Arbor in 1961, he found
the ONCE GROUP was already
performing new music inde-
pendently. But the initial musi-
ca accent of ONCE gradually
turned to theater, and by 1964,
the group had more or less run
its course of effectiveness as far
as music was concerned.

The turning point came in
the summer of 1966. Armed with
a budget that in the end budged
little more than mimeographed
programs, Wilson managed to
piece together a program of
new sounds with School of
Music students performing. A
standing-room-only mob w a s
the response to this unpubliciz-
ed labor of love.
Subsequent grants from the
Rackham School of Graduate
Studies and the Rockefeller
Foundation, coupled with the
dedication of key individ-
uals like Wilson, Ross Lee Fin-
ney, and several hard-working
musicians, have nurtured Con-
temporary Directions to its pre-
sent thriving state.
Music on a piece of paper
is not real music. Music is a live
art, fully alive only when real-
ized in performance. When a
society cannot "afford" to pre-
sent contemporary musical ex-
pression as well as past master-
pieces, it runs the risk of turn-
ing a vital art into a dead in-
stitution.
Contemporary Directions stri-
ves to avoid such an abhorrent
cultural bog by presenting its
programs to the public free of
charge.

Cancelled

0

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"EASY BUDGET TERMS"

482-9533

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234 W. Michiqon Ave.
Ypsilanti

INSURANCE CENTER
ARLAN'S DEPT. STORE

2465 W. Stadium Blvd.
Ann Arbor

665-3789

U

IHA PRESENTS
iain te
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Rejected

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Declined

SUBJECTS NEEDED
FOR EXPERIMENT:
Must be native speakers of English with
no history of a hearing disorder or speech
impediment.
Subjects needed for four hours at $1.50
hour.
Please call DAVID P I SO N I, 764-2594
from 10 A.M.-12 Midnight or CRLLB, 764-
0510 9-5.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 4-8:30 P.M.
HILL AUDITORIUM
TICKETS: $2:00-$2.50-$3.00 on sale at SAB September 29-October 3

' f '

STARTING TONIGHT
AT 8 P.M.

STRTN TNIH DA

DIAL
5-6290

ACADEMY AWARD I BEST ACTRESS!

*

BARBRA STREISAND

1The
WILLIAM WYLER-
RAY STARK

d

I ~~c~est people,~g
SAIMPAS r+
r

COLUMBIA PICTURES and RASTAR PRODUCTIONS p'esent
BARBRA STREISAND -OMAR SHARIF:"FUNNY GIRL"
KA MEDFRD ANNE FRA ,Cg ALTER PODGEON3asmraZr
H EERI RLy tcULE SYNE lBOB MERRLL
LU

i

MATINEES at 1:30 on Wed.-Sat.-Sun. Onlv-Fri. & Sat. at 8-

-Sun. Eve at 7:30

IN HILL AUDITORIUM
SECOND ANNUAL DANCE SERIES
NATIONAL BALLET OF CANADA ...... Fri., Oct. 17
PROGRAM: Solitaire; Four Temperanents;
and The Nutcracker, Act. II.

* JOSE LIMON DANCE COMPANY
"'NIKOLAIS DANCE COMPANY.
DANZAS VENEZUELA.
RAYOL WINNIPEG BALLE'T'

8:30, Sat., Nov
8:30, Wed., Jan.
5:30, TCus., Ieb.
2:30, Sun., Mar.

.1
21
17
15

AI
"MacaUbre Success ." -Ann Arbor News
"Mounts to a Marvelous Climax" -Michigan Daily
TONIGHT AT 8:00!
r0
SEPTEMBER 30-OCTOBER 12
Directed by t4Cwt
John Housemanq4k
plus "PLAY" by
Samuel Rrktt

"For these modern Dance Companies, Lecture-demonstrations are scheduled for Fri.,
Oct. 31, and Tues., Jan. 20 respectively. Tickets: $1.00. Season ticket subscribers
to the Dance Series will receive complimentary admission.
SEASON TICKETS: $17.50--$15 00-s12.50--$10.00-$7.50
SINGLE PERFORMANCES: $6.00-$5.50-$5.00-$4.00-$3.00-$2.00
MISHA DICT1::1TERI
Brilliant -young Amercian Pianist
Winner at Tchaikovsk y Cmnpetition in Moscow in 1966
Monday, Oct. 6, 8:30 P.M.
IN HILL AUDITORIUM

PROG RAM:

I kWA W 9 fmAI,- f A

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