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October 03, 1969 - Image 3

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CINEMA II
DISNEY'S
Alice In Wonderland
"Disney the outeur. In the Pinnochio tradition."-
Sarris
-plus-
PETER SELLERS
Muckinese Battlehorn
"This reminds me of Citizen Kane, but not very
much."-Orson Welles
-plus-
W. C. FIELDSE
The Fatal Glass of Beer
"Everybody must get stoned."-Dylan
OCTOBER 3-4
FRI.-SAT. 7-9:15 Aud. A 75c (cheap)
NEXT WEEK:
RAY'S
Two Daughters

seconid frot t r&4e

P

ftr4itiau

ttil

NEWS PHONE: 764-6552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Friday, October 3, 1969

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

Pu ertE
'By LYNN WEINER
Puerto R i c a n government
agents yesterday arrested 19
persons described as leftists on
conspiracy and concealed wea-
pons charges.
The arrests seem related to
the outbreaks of violence in pro-
test of the draft underlining
growing support for Puerto Ri-
can independence. The out-
breaks have received scant cov-
erage in the North American
media.
The invasion of t h e ROTC
building at t h e University of
Puerto Rico and the destruction
of a department store last week
are just two of the violent ex-
pressions for independence that
conflict with statements favor-
ing statehood made by Luis A.
Ferre, the governor of Puerto
Rico.

Rica ns

protest

U. S.

conscription

"Ferre has been trying to are-
ate the image that Puerto Ri-
cans want statehood for Puerto
Rico," Rodolfo Rodriguez, grad,
says, "but he has not been able
to forsee that his actions were
going to speed up a process of
political polarization."
Rodriguez says "Recent events
in Puerto Rico show things are
happening there which are dif-
ferent than what one would be-
lieve through the UPI and AP
cables. Is it that the truth ne-
gates Ferres ' pre - fabricated
image of Puerto Rico as a para-
dise for investors and tourism,
as a land that 'proudly' desires
statehood?" Rodriguez believes
this image is being destroyed by
the 'indep'endistas' of t h e is-
land.
One 'independista' group, the
Armed Commandos for Libera-

tion (CAL) has threatened to
kill one resident from the main-
land for every Puero Rican who
is imprisoned for dodging the
draft.
Despite CAL's threats, Edwing
Feliciano Grafals was sentenced
to a year in prison last week.
Grafals said "moral, political,
and religious convictions" kept
him from participating in the
war.
He was the first-Puerto Rican
to be convicted for draft evasion
since World War II.
The sentence triggered an im-
mediate protest demonstration
at the University of Puerto Rico,
where a crowd estimated by the
San Juan Star at 2,000 students
surged onto ROTC grounds.
Students invaded the ROTC
building, set fire to offices and

destroyed furniture and equip-
ment.
96 other Puerto Rican draft
resisters are facing trial in the
federal court of the U.S. in San
Juan.
"Blood taxation without rep-
resentation; Independence for
Puerto Rico-now!" is the re-
sisters, slogan, since Puerto Ri-
cans do not have voting repre-
sentation in the U.S. Congress,
but are still being conscripted.
The CAL threat was made last
week by one of the island's lead-
ing spokesmen for independence,
Juan Mari Bras, of the Pro-In-
dependence Movement, before a
crowd estimated between 30,000
and 40,000. The people w e r e
celebrating t h e 1868 revolt
against Spain at the mountain
town of Lares.

As Bras issued the warning,
many in the crowd chanted
"Bombs now" and "Fire, fire,
the Yankees want fire."
CAL also claimed responsibili-
ty for the fire last week that
destroyed a Woolworth's De-
partment Store in San J u a n
with an estimated loss of more
than $1,400,000, as well as for
other past terrorist action on
the island. The group promised
to shortly make public an
"easy" manual on arson.
In addition to the Woolworth
fire, eleven unexploded bombs
were found in other U.S. stores.
The bombs had been timed, ac-
cording to police, to explode at
the same time of night that the
Woolworth's fire broke out.
"Gov. Ferre has blamed the
terrorist acts on foreign influ-
Chcag,

ence, including Castro's Cuba,
rather than as an internal re-
sponse to a national situation,"
says Rodriguez.
Nationalist sentiment h a s
been linked in the past with the
attempted assassination of Pres-
ident Harry Truman in 1950 at
Blair House in Washington and
an attack in 1954 on members
of the U.S. House of Represent-
atives.
Most of the Puerto Rican "in-
dependistas", after a history of
factional struggles, haye been
able in the last two years to or-
ganiza a common front.
"There is room for disagree-
ment within the framework of
unity," said Bras at Lares. "The
important thing is to realize the
role of each organization in the
struggle of the Puerto Rican
people for their liberation."
o 8'

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

Li
THE UNITED STATES detonated a one-megaton bomb yes-
terday in the Aleutian Islands without setting off the earthquake
some scientists had feared.
The proposed blast had set off protests from Alaska, Canada and
Japan in fear it could cause an earthquake or tidal wave in the North-I
Pacific area.
AEC officials say the blast was to check the feasibility of setting
off other tests op Amchitka, 1400 miles southwest of Anchorage. They
have not said there will be other blasts on the island.
However, various AEC disclosures in Washington say there could
be at least three more tests ranging up to three megatons in power.
AFL-CIO PRESIDENT GEORGE MEANY yesterday accused
President Nixon of trying to fight inflation at the expense of
workers' jobs.
Nixon replied he is trying to stop price hikes from depleting the
purchasing power of the nation's wage earners.
Meany said Nixon's policies of tight money, high interest, and
federal budget cuts are aimed at driving prices down while pushing
unemployment up.
TWO EARTHQUAKES jolted a 150 mile stretch of Northern
California Wednesday night.
The "moderately strong" shock, recording 5.5 on the Richter
Scale, injured 26 persons although none seriously. Some building
walls collapsed, windows shattered, and water and gas mains were
ruptured.
THE ARMY'S PROVOST MARSHAL stopped the court mar-
tial of the service's top enlisted man, senators were told yester-
day.
Maj. Gen. Carl Turner, halted investigation of Sgt. Maj. William
Wooldridge on charges that he had led a band of racketeers in uni-
form.
Army investigator Jack Pruett said Wooldridge would be allowed
to resign from the Army if there were to be no investigations into
allegations of multimillion dollar thefts and conspiracy to manipu-,
late currency.
LEADERS OF WEST GERMANY'S Social Democratic and
Free Democratic parties announced today an agreement for a t
coalition government.t
The announcement came from Willy Brandt, foreign minister and
leader of the Social Democrats, and Walter Scheel of the small Free
Democratic Party.
The new government plan will have to be presented to both the1
president and the parliament of West Germany. Scheel said he was,
"optimistic" that the joint program would win approval. .
* * *
VIETNAM BATTLE ACTION yesterday dwindled to the lowest 1
level of the yea'r.

Asociated Press
(voppi in jail again
The Rev. James Groppi sits in his cell in Dane County Jail,
Madison, Wisconsin, after being arrested for contempt of the
State Assembly. Groppi had led a three day welfare demonstration
at the state capitol.
SER VICE,. ACHIEVEMENT:
Facultv win awards

attorneys quiz
Daley'saide
By JENNY STILLER
Special To The Daily
CHICAGO - The communications gap between the Chi-
cago city government and radical youth yawned wide again
yesterday, as defense attorneys for the 'Chicago 8' continued
their cross examination of David E. Stahl, Mayor Richard
Daley's administrative officer.
Stahl reiterated that he took very seriously any state-
ments by members of the National Mobilization Committee to
End the War in Vietnami and the Youth International Party,
(Yippies), which irldicated,'-
they advocated violence, whilee
quent protestations that they
!wanted peaceful demonstra-
tions. plan Oct. !
Particular furor was generated
over defendant Abbie Hoffman's
statement that he thought the r e
Yippie's planned Festival of Life in
Lincoln Park would be so use- A group of 120 medical stu-
ful in drawing young people away dents, doctors and faculty also
from the Democratic National last night urged others in the
Convention that the city govern- Medical School to join them in the
ment ought to donate $100,000 to general strike against the war in
sponsor the event, "or better still, Vietnam on Oct. 15.
give $100,000 for the Yippies to The group also planned alter-
sponsor it, or better yet, give me nate activities for the day marking
the $100,000 and I will leave the first time the medical school
town," Hoffman is alleged to have has taken a stand on any social
said. issue.
Stahl said he took the state- The activities include the show-
ment seriously. e ing of the film The War Game,
me seriosl ndatd which was censured from the Brit-
The witness, also indicated that ish Broadcasting Company for its
he did not believe defandent Day- I gruesome nature.
id Dellinger's statement that he The group is also organizing a
wished' to avoid violence, because rally to be held outside of Univer-
Dellinger followed the remark sity Hospital followed by a march
with a declaration that he believ- to the Diag. The rally is planned
ed in civil disobedience. to last the entire day.
While protesting that "I don't_ _ _
know what civil disobedience is,"
Stahl finally admitted that such Prof. Eugene E. van Tamelen of
action "need not be violent." Stanford University is this year's
I Werner E. Bachmann Memorial
Defense Attorney, Leonard Lecturer in the department of
Weinglass, was stopped by re- chemistry.
peated objections from the pro- Prof. van Tamelen, whose re-
secution. As he attempted to search interests lie mainly in or-
get Stahl to admit that t h e ganic chemistry, will speak on
1 mayor's office acted either nega- "New Developments in Bio-Organ-
tivaly or not at all in denying the ic Synthesis" on Oct. 31 in Room
See DALEY'S, Page 6 1400 of the Chemistry Bldg.

u" WEEKS ONLY!

I

IIUR

SACADEMY
AWARD
IWINNER!v

i

"BEST FpOR EGN ?IIvl

Twelve members of the Univer-
sity faculty received $10,500 in
awards at the annual Faculty-
Staff Convocation last week.
George J. Slykhouse, chairman
of the President's Club said. "We
consider not only the professor's
contribution to the Unversity but
his role as a professor in his par-
ticular discipline and his contri-
bution in this capacity."
Distinguished A c h i e v e in e n t
Awards of $1000 were presented
to five senior faculty members:
Angus Campbell, director of the
Survey Research Center of the
Institute for Social Research and
a psychology and sociology pro-
fessor.
Others include chairman of the
history department. Sidney Fine:

chemistry Prof. Robert C. Elder-
field; architecture Prof. Walter B.
Sanders and Prof. Maurice J. Sin-
nott of chemical and metalurgical
engineering.
Distinguished Service Awards
of $750 for assistant professors
were awarded to: David Angus,
education: Dale E. Briggs, chem-
ical engineering: Max A. Heirich,
sociology: Bert G.. Hornback. Eng-
lish: Kenneth A. Luther, Persian
studies and William Rosenberg,
history.
In addition, David J. Steinberg,
associate professor of history was
presented with a $1,000 Univer-
sity of Michigan Press Book Award
for his volume. Phillipine Collabo-
ration in World War II.

In a total of four skirmishes, two
twenty-five wounded. The four clashes
ranged from the demilitaried zone to old

Americans were killed and
involving U.S. infantrymen
battlefields north of Saigon.

a

THE TWO PART PRODUCTION OF
LEO TOLSTOY'S
WAR
and.
PEACE
PRESENTED BY THE WALTER READE ORGANIZATION AND SATRA
IN COLOR * RELEASED BY CONTINENTAL
PART I AMEOFAU TERUT, NOW SHOWING
THE ENTIRE PRODUCTION OF "WAR AND PEACE"
WILL BE SHOWN IN TWO PARTS. EACH PART WILL
BE SHOWN FOR ONE WEEK!

out
the
I11,6KS .
;PWTH..oruM UNDERGROUND MOVIES
Friday and Saturday evenings at 11:15 P.M.
not continuous with "War and Peace." separate admission
DIFFERENT PROGRAM EACH WEEK
. CALIFORNIA BOUND with W.C. FIELDS
" IT'S ABOUT THIS CARPENTER
Christ in the East Villaqe
* FILM EXERCISE NO. 1
First of the Whitnevs' world famous FIVE FILM EXERCISES.
Abstract visuals and original synthetic sound score.
" CHINESE FIREDRILL
Winner of innumerable 1st Prizes. Fascinatino
Cinepoem of a schizophrenic vounq mon

MISSOURI vs. MICHIGAN
FOOTBALL

I

I

WCBN

Oil

650

'WITH
BRIAN DANIELS
A. WISK

JAY LOUIS
1 :20 P.M.

Saturday, Oct. 4

I

I

I

Ri
Special Rate
APA PRODUCTION OF

Oct. 9
2:00 P.M.

rf

TICKETS
$3.00
Refreshments

U

1

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