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June 16, 1967 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1967-06-16

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY. JUNE 16. 1967

PAGETWOHEI__IA AILY

THEATRE
'Oedipus Rex': New Approach
To Ann Arbor Dramatic Art

By ELLEN FRANK
Andrew Lugg came here from
England 18 months ago as a phys-
ics student. Since then he has in-
congruously become the thorn in
the sides of the arts in Ann Arbor.
As a judge in the Ann Arbor Film
Festival, and as a Tilm and drama
critic he has exhorted Ann Arbor
culturists to seek experimental
new directions.
Last week in The Daily, he at-
tacked Ann Arbor drama as a
"theatre museum." He charged
that the controlling drama elite
has shunned the avant garde, with
the defensive claim that "Ann
Arbor audiences are not ready for
experimental theatre." Citing the
developments of Peter Brook and
Charles Marowitz, he cried for the
necessity of "creating a theatre
heritage for our time."

The new directions called for
last week by Andrew Lugg have
been in part answered by his pro-
duction of "Oedipus Rex," playing
at the Canterbury House through
tonight.
"Oedipus" in one sense is simple
theatre. The costuming is minimal,
the theatre small and the staging
basic. Far from a new idea in
theatre, this simplicity is new to
Ann Arbor and a refreshing
change from University Players
and the APA-PTP productions.
"Oedipus," written by the cast
and the director, is dependent
upon the tragedy of Sophocles. One
must know the classic to follow
the basic lines of the new inter-
pretation. In this sense, it is not
for everyone in Ann Arbor.
On the other hand the play
serves well in filling the city's

void of interpretive dramatic art. 1
The Canterbury House piece
contains some masterful writing,
integrating classic Greek dialogue
with the modern. This linguistic.
intermixing, the sharp divisions
between scenes and the indirect
discourses between character cre-
ate something unexpected in Ann
Arbor's theatrical language. It as-
sumes the dimensions of sound as
well as meaning; of rhythm as
well as direct communication. The
linguistic totality results in a flow-
ing tonal poem which goes beyond
the limitations of characteriza-
tion, plot and language.
These new dramatic dimensions
are supplemented by the small and
flexible cast. The chorus of two,
played by Susan Daily and Amy
Cohen, serve in the Greek manner
of commentary. Peter Lempert's
well-done three character role of
messenger, Laius and Teiresias
swells the flowing integrated form

GOPf
LANSING (P)-House Republi-
can leaders apparently can pick'
up at least four crucial tax votes
by agreeing not to collect a state
income levy unless the people ap-
prove it in a special election this
fall. They need 56 votes to pass
the bill.
Four of the six maverick Repub-
licans who have previously refus-
ed to vote for the House GOP
tax package said Wednesday nightj
they would support it if it con-i
M[SU Truse

ain
tained the referendum provisi
The other two said they w
thinking it over.
If the self-styled "Little Six" i
their votes to the 50 alre;
thought to be in hand, the Ho
Republican package-with its
per cent personal income tax
could pass without Democri
help.
Expected to weigh against
idea was the fear that if vot
reject the income tax in Septe
Sq

Votes

"-I ~ L3 .5. -~ ~

for

Tax

Bill

k *.

Andrea Fills Sterile Stage
With 'Barrage of Emotion

) of the tragedy. The switches in

By AVIVA KEMPNER and
JUDY MUSKET
Wednesday night in Ann Arbor
High auditorium people came to
hear "Andrea in Concert." The
auditorium, however, should have
been a forest of pine trees and
Andrea Joseph could have stood
in the middle, filling the universe
with song. But as it was, Ann
Arbor High has a small auditorium
whose walls acted like barrier's to
her wonderful barrage of emotion.
The concert included a variety
of songs and talent. Her material
ran from sweet gentle love songs
like Lightfoot's "Early Morning
Rain" to the classic "Joys of
Love," to the rough, sexy "Jelly
Roll Baker" and, eventually, to
theimmortal "Draft Dodger Rag."
The music filled the air as she
belted out other songs in her deep
and powerful voice, even during
the softer numbers. She also sang
"Following the Drinking Gourd"
and her own bluesy version of
"Black Girl." But a piercing
beam projected down the middle
of the room as she sang "He lived
alore in Town."
Her accompanist, Steve Mandel,

covered the spectrum of his twelve
string guitar as he picked out a
simple melody that changed often
to an intricate harmony.
Miss Joseph, an Eastern Michi-
gan University junior majoring in
fine arts, made her debut in
March at New York at Don's Soi-
ree.
Her performacne was the initial
effort of an area group, San-Am-
drue, who will use the proceeds
for grants to young artists, writers
and musicians. Composed of five
members, including an University
graduate student, the group plans
to sponsor similar events to raise
money for their fund to help
young people in the arts. i
"The performer will always be
separate from the recipient," ex-
plained one of the founders, D. K.
,Furbush, grad. "Our group was
formed by mutual friends who are
interested in the arts; and thought
more help was needed for people
in the various fields of arts."
Such a worthwhile organization
began their plans with a singer
who gave the audience a beautiful
experience, even though the world
did not get the chance to feel
what Miss Joseph has to offer.

character are self-explanatory-_
because in essence he plays no
character of the drama as a whole.
The same poetic characterlessness
applies to David Bernstein, ful-
filling the roles of herdsman and
Creon.'
Eric Brown brilliantly develops
the changes in Oedipus from blind
king to man to the tragic near-
sage. The development is done not
through character but through
mood, through the intermixed and
indirect dialogue and by his in-
tense involvement and interaction
wih the rest of the cast.
Norma Jean Giannasio molds a
Jocasta of deep, nearly physical
sensuality who is at once classic
Greek yet a modern Pinter-
woman.
The play as a whole is remark-
able simply because it is a whole-
because no one person, dominates,
no single scene is to be separated
from what preceeds or follows.
Andrew Lugg asked for new dra-
matic forms and experimentation
for Ann Arbor. "Oedipus Rex" is
an exicting answer to that de-
mand, even as director, Andrew
Lugg represents only part of a
whole.

Race Balance Report
EAST LANSING MP)-Trustees opportunity to qualify for admis
said, in effect, yesterday, they sion under existing academic an
don't want Michigan State to be financial requirements'. . ."
a University just for "rich, white Sabine prefaced his report o
kids." what MSU is doing to aid th
The Trustees heard a report on needy and disadvantaged by quot
what MSU is doing to aid needy ing from an article in the Jun
and disadvantaged students. issue of "Science Magazine" on th
They listened to a Negro youth UM situation.
about to graduate and become a The article quoted a Universil
computer expert. source as saying: "The govern
There were pointed references ment man said that our universit
to government criticism of the was basically for rich, white kid
University of Michigan because it So it is. So are most other inst
has so few Negro students and tutions in the country."
professors. A defense department surve
A federal report which called was conducted at the Universit
the University "basically for rich, to determine if it was living up b
white kids," could not possibly ap- government requirements of non
ply to MSU, said Dr. Gordon Sa- discrimination.
bine, Vice President for Special It criticized the scarcity of N
Projects. gro students at the University an
The board then adopted a reso- the lack of Negroes among facult
lution pledging MSU to every ef- members and in top positions.
fort to aid the disadvantaged. The report suggested the Un
The resolution further specified versity "should develop program
that "the board petition the State to change- this image and inforn
Board of Education and the Gov- the public that all students wit
ernor that this policy be adopted basic average ability are we
by all state-supported colleges and come."
universities." . The University Administratio
The main body of the resolu- first said it was difficult to fin
tion declared it be board policy Negro students and faculty mem
that Michigan State "continue to bers able to meet academic stan
devote as much as possible of its ards. It later reported the numbe
treasure and talent to educating of Negro employes had been in
the qualified disadvantaged and creased, that special scholarship
to conduct extra-ordinary research were provided for Negro studen
gan youths who have not had the and cited work with the Tuskege
to discover how to inspire Michi- Institute, Alabama Negro colleg

is-
nd
on
he'
4-
ne
he
ity
n-
bty
is.
bi-
ey
bty
to
n-
e-
nd
lty
si-
ns
, m
th
on
nd
n-
.d-
oer
n-
ips
its
,ee
ge.

ber-after lawmakers have pass- agreements with individual Demo-'
ed the billion-dollar budget ex- crats, in the search for needed
pected in fiscal 1967-68-it could support for their income tax pack-
leave the state in serious financial age.
trouble. The Democratic caucus decid-
The popular-vote scheme emerg- ed Tuesday that no member shoulds
ed Wednesday as five of the six agree to vote for the House tax
reluctant Republicans met with program until bipartisan negotia-
either Gov. George Romney or his tions had molded it into shape
aides. more attractive to Democrats as
Romney was described as not a party.
enthusiastic about the proposal. The move clearly was made to
However, he reportedly did not re- head off Republican attempts to
ject it. win the votes'of individual Demo-
No Cash Crisis cratic members for the GOP-
'Romney said the state is not drafted program now before the
in a cash crisis now "and we won't House.
be if we get fiscal reform or go on
an austerity budget, and we will nI
do one or the other." 0oro" est Chi
However, he said, the state has
lost $75 million in revenue by not
having put a fiscal reform pro-
gram into effect by last April 1.
The Republican holdouts who
said they would vote for the pack-
age if it contained a referendum 'ontinued from Page 1)
provision were Reps. Lionel Stacey the National Guard if needed.
of Benton Harbor, Edson Root of The commisisoner ordered city
Bangor, Robert Stites of Anitou doctor examinations of policemen
Beach and Donald Holbrook of reporting ,Ill and said anyone
Clare. found a "malingerer" would be
Doubters suspended.
Rep. Frederic Marshall (R-Al- At the same time the police-
len) and Rep. Don Pears (R- men's union attorney, Winston
Buchanan) have not said whether Livingston, predicted 500 men
they will or will not support the might call in sick by Saturday
Republican tax package but have and 1,000 by Monday.
not expressed favoritism of it. "It's going to spread through
It was considered possible-but the department," said Livingston.
far from certain-that Republi- 'Sick' Tally
cans might attract one or two The Detroit Police Officers As-
Democratic votes for their pack- sociation, policemen's union, said
age. 170 men called in sick, including
Republicans apparently earlier 123 on the day shift yesterday and
faced the unwelcome chore of for- 47 on the night shift.
mal negotiations with Democratic Carl Parsell, 43, veteran patrol-
leaders gather than informal

I
r
t
1
t
r
t
r

man and union president, accused
Girardin of a "pressure tactic" in
placing the 42 men on beat duty.
He termed the situation "'quite
serious."
Parsell said the union does not
endorse the ticket-writing slow-
down.
Uses Own Discretion
However, be said policemen
had the right to use their own
discretion in ticketing motorists
and he defended the men who
called in sick.
He also said the sick calls were
"triggered" by the fact one of
the transferred policemen was a
union steward.
Girardin was supported by May-
or Cavanagh.

In its present form, the House
package contains income taxes of
212 per cent on individuals. 5 per
cent on corporations and 7 per
cent on financial institutions.
It would repeal the business ac-
tivities tax, cut the intangibles
tax and provide a 14 per cent
cut in school and county proper-
ty taxes, while appropriating an
estimated $85 million a year to lo-
cal governments on a population
basis.
The package is designed to net
the state $300 million in new tax
money a year after full implemen-
tation.
ef's Discipline
SCall-in Sick

AV

ON

U j

Phone 434-0130
EnAiwwe ON.CARPENTER ROAR

The Area's Finest Drive-in is easy
to reach - 2 miles south of
Washtenaw Rd. on Carpenter.
BOX OFFICE
OPEN 7:00 P.M.

International Classics
presents
GIOVANNA RALLI
and
ANOUK AIMEE
in
LA FUGA
Mon.-Thurs.: 7-9
41h
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Z10 S. Fifth Avenue
761-9700

JONAT H AN W INT ERS
ROBERT MORSE and
ROD STEIGER
FRIDAY and SATURDAY,
CIAN "unM A171E,
AuditoriumAtAhLLHL

~~~...f.;.}"..w "r.w.- ...y.,.yy.. ..*. J", i+'" , VAr >R'9{. a.vMI+;p 7s rS? a> '°'>i^a ~ .,sh ,.
D-AILY -OFFICIAL BULLETIN
...... .... i. \h":h "1~ h/i .'hi}G \§.4".".4Y~i{"lY'.Y":.}:4 .Y:Li !A .YSi '.s... A .':"4J.'"r .}:4:"1:":4. . .:i::":J.J".*:. f : . .~':l4:}J}:Jf.. j:,: J """:}"t:

FIRST
RUN

HELD OVER

FIRST
RUN

I

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Micnigan for which The
Michigan Dlly assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent to TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Admibistration Bldg. be-
fore 2 P.M. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Satarday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request;' Day
Calendar items appeaf once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information cali 64-9270.
FRIDAY, JUNE 16
Day Calendar
Conference-"International Confer-
ence on Systematic Biology": Rackham
Lectur Hall, 8:30 a.m.
Bureau of Industrial Relations en-
mnar -"Management by' Objectives":
ORGAN IZATI ON
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available in
Room 1311 SAB.
s * *
Folk' Dance Club (WAA), Folk dance
with instruction open to everyone,
Fri., June 16. 8-11 p.m., Barbour Gym.

Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m. to 3:15 p.m.
Conference-"Midwest Fulbright Con-
ference on Higher Education": Tele-
vision Room, South Quadrangle, 9 a.m.
Astronomical Colloquium: Fri., June
16, 4 p.m., Room 807 Physics-Astron-
omy Bldg. Dr. Robert P. Kraft. Mount
wilson and Palomar Observatories,
Pasadena, Calif., will speak on "The
Twisted Lives of Main Sequence Contact
Binaries as Performed by the Inmates
of the w UMa Asylum under 'the Di-
rection of the Count de Estrellas."
Cinema Guild-Laurel and Hardy's
"A Chump at Oxford" and "Our Rela-
tions": Architecture Aud., 7 and 9:05
p.m.
General Notices
Registration Materials: For graduate
students planning to enroll in the Sum-
nmer Half Term mad~ be picked up in
the Rackham Bldg. June 19-23,26 and 27
from 8-12 and 1-4 p.m.
French and German Preliminary Ob-
jective Test: The Preliminary Objective
Test in French and German administ-
ered by the Graduate School for doc-
toral candidates is schehuled for Mon.,
July 10, from 3 to 5 p.m. in the Rack-
ham Lecture Hall. ALL students plan-
ning to take the test must register by
2 p.m. July 10, at the Information Desk
in the lobby of the Rackham Building.
For further information call the In-
formation Desk, 764-4415.

Placement
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Peace Corps Test-To be given this
Sat., June 17, at the downtown post
office, Main and Catherine Sts., at 1
p.m. Completed applications should be
brought to the test center, available
at the Bureau.
Federal Service Entrance Examination
(FSEE)-To be given Sat,, June 17, for
those persons whose applications were
filed by May 17. Report to the down-
town post office, corner of Main and
Catherine Sts. at 9 a.m. Next test date
is Aug. 12, 1967 and applications must
be filed by July 12, 1967, in order to
take this test,
POSITION OPENINGS:
Blackstone Valley Communitc Ac-
tion Program, Inc.-Neighborhood Legal
Services Program. Chief Counsel, Asst.
Director, 2.,attorneys. Program will offer
free legal services to low income resi-
dents in all phases of law.
Dept. of the Air Force, Hdgrts.,
1001st Air Base Wing, Andrews Air Force
Base, Washington, D.C.-Career engrg.
positions, various fields; Supv. General
Engineer, Architect. Submit applica-
tions for federal employment (SF-57).
Bristol Laboratories, Syracuse, N.Y.
-Bacteriologist, Biochemist, Biologist,
Pharmacists, Chemists, Engineers; ad-
min, positions, copywriter, mkt. res. an-
alyst, programmed learning writer, pro-
grammers, accountant. Varied educ. lev-
els BS-PhD.
* * *
For further information please call
764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAB.

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