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May 06, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1967-05-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY,

....

MUSIC

Fund Shortage May Cause Tuition Hikes

Aolumbia s 'Six N
how Wrmth1, D
By R. A. PERRY A remarkable clarity exposes each t
Every day is a holiday in the part played lovingly by Cleve-
ertising game, and Columbia land's first chair instrumental-
cords has gleefully proclaimed ists. (ML 6368)
y as George Szell month. For A second release, which couples
occasion they have released Mendelssohn's "I t a 1 i a n" Sym-
new Cleveland Orchestra re- I phony and Schubert's "Unfinish-j
dings, most of which, it should ed" Symphony, can receive only
noted, are really reprints from mixed blessings. (ML 6375) Men-
er Epic pressings. delssohn called his Fourth Sym-
zell and the Cleveland Orches- phony "the most amusing piece
are niot everyone's cup of lieb- I have ever done," and it receives
umilch. Without a doubt, this an exciting and flawless reading
hestra stands as the most dis- under Szell. The quicksilver open-
lined in the country, and one ing allegro, fiendishly difficult for
ic, without too much poetic - -

ew Szell Records
ynamic Precision

i
s
1

(Continued from Page 1)
"All possible sources of revenue
are constantly under considera-
tion," he replied in response to the
defeat of the House bill. "Therel
is still hope that they can find
sane agreeable combination of
taxes in the time remaining in this
legislative session. The University
remains hopeful that there will be
a revenue adjustment in the state
this year."
Hannah is not so optimistic. He
warned that if tuition increases
were announced at this time, "the

situation will be the result of the
"austerity"budget announced re-
cent'y by Gov. Romney as the onlyl
alternative to his fiscal reformj
package.
"You can't make up the millionsi
you need just on student fees," he'
explained, MSU tuition rates,t
which are about equal to Univer-
sity tuition schedules would be in-
creased by obout $75 dollars'
across-the-board.
He claimed that the Presidents
Council composed of a number of
cc llege and university administra-

The Presidents Council recently
joined with the State Board of
Education in the formation of a
joint commiit e to lobby in Lan-
sing for passage of an income tax
in some form.
"Many of the presidcnts are get-
ting discouraged by the deadlock
in the Legislature, Hannah
claimed.
Although his original budget

was considered austere, Romne:i's
total budget would be trimmed
further, by $185 million, which
would overall be 16 per cent below
the original $1,153 billion.
The 11 public colleges and uni-
versities included on the budget
would get a total of $241 million
in state operating and construe-
ton funds-a reduction of more
than 20 per cent.

the violins at the proper
tempo, is not in the least slu
or strained by the Cleve
string section.
The Schubert, however, ten
plod, especially in the first n
ment. Too often unnecess
heavy accents retard the
flow of the music, a flow w
marks the older Walter re
ing. Another preferred versic
Cantelli's on the budget-p
Seraphim label.
Specially packaged and pr
Columbia has released new ree

ense, has said that they play
ke a soloist." Indeed, seldom
1 you hear inprecise phrasing,
yed ends, or erratic timing
m this group. Each note is set
o the conception of the whole
e a jewel in a Faberge brooch,
At his best Szell infuses a grace
d warmth . into the ensemble
cision. In less inspired mo-
nts, his performances suffer
m a heaviness, a four-square
idity that somehow fails to give,
n'music its own vital life. At
ese times, his music sounds-per-
t but moribund.
The best of Columbia's recent
eases pairs Mozart's Clarinet
n'certo with his early, Diverti-
nto No. 2, K. 131. The former
ce comes from that late period,
en Mozart no longer "comic
sed" but seemed simply to
athe out music, Robert Mar-
lus achieves beautifully that
tural respiring quality of this
Ine, open music. The perform-
ce, second only to De Peyer's
London, receives perfectly bal-
ced orchestral support.
Szell excells in the Divertimen-
a witty, playful piece of ele-
nt entertainment music, most
table for its frothy horn parts.

'iles Sm*ies' Best,
Of Davis on Record
By DAVID BERSON ment is awesome and his coi
Ever since Miles Davis replaced tion is original and interesting
an old and tiring rhythm section the group barely makes it.
with a very young and fresh one The weakest member is d
five years ago, each of his suc- mer Jack DeJohnette, who]
cessive recordings has been bet- both the subtlety and delicacy
ter than the previous one. His Lloyd demands. Bassist Cecil
latest, "Miles Smiles" (Columbia- Bee is very poorly recorded.
2601) is one of the best of his But probably the biggestr
long and fruitful recording career, block to the group's succes
At first listening, the music this record is pianist Keith
seems scattered and vague, but rett. The problem is simply
it is the kind of album that gets Jarrett is so good that the
better with each playing. Between of the group is usually about
Miles on trumpet; Wayne Shorter, or six measures behind hin
tenor saxophone; Herbie Han- his early twenties, he is o
cock, piano; Ron Carter, bass, and the most prodigious talents in
Anthony Williams on drums there today with tremendous techn
is such an abundance of talent, a beautiful ' conceptin, a
that the listener finds it hard to seemingly endless flow of idea
keep his attention on the group .Despite the albums drawb
rather than each member. But the album is well worth the
by now the quintet is so tight and dust to hear Jarrett.
so integrated that no one man de-
tracts from another's playing.
The key to the group's relative-
ly new sound is Shorter, once an
erratic sideman with Art Blakey's
Jazz Messengers, but now one of *Q!
the top three or four men on his Iddmg fo
instrument. The album doesn't
swing in the traditional sense, it WINNER OF6 A
cooks with white-ish heat. The
six compositions, three of them by
Shorter, are fragmentary with
loose harmonic construction. They ST PICTI
set the soloists with the propellent
rhythm of Carter and Williams
and prevent any of them from
falling back on well-worn cliches>
which once marred Davis' work.
Another new album, which, in
many ways is everything the Davis
LP isn't and vice versa, is 'Live
at Monterrey" (Atlantic-1473) by
the Charles Lloyd Quartet. Lloyd
is an intriguing reedman, who
made his debut with Chico Ham-
ilton in 1961, and has been trying
to match his striking success with
that group ever since.'
The album, recorded at last
summer's Monterrey Jazz Festival,
is his fourth and best as a leader,
but not yet up to his collaborations
with Hamilton and guitarist Ga-
bor Szabo. Lloyd plays very well
on the album. His technical equip- 'f

fast ings of the four symphonies of
urred Brahms, also performed by George
eland Szell and the Cleveland Orchestra.
Knowing Szell's propensity to
ds to heaviness, one might expect this
hove- set to bow to the keen competition.
sarily On the contrary, the four sym-
easy phonies receive amazingly dy-
7hich namic, sharp, and exciting per-
tord- formances.
on is There are two ways to avoid
riced the heavy-handed excesses of
Brahm's often bloated themes:
riced, one is to underplay such an4
cord- stress the smaller tensions and
voices, to paint the trees instead
of the forest. Toscanini takes this
approach with wonderful success.
A second way is to grasp the
larger statements with such vigor
and incisiveness that the bour-
geoise fatness is shaken off and
the whole is revitalized. Szell
chooses this latter approach and
he too, for the most part, suc-
ncep- ceeds marvelously.
g, but The opening movement of the
Second Symphony emerges won-
rum- derfully lean and exciting, with a
lacks controlled forward drive that
that never once lets you down. Like-
Mc- wise, there is no shmaltz about
the famous fourth movement
road- theme of the First Symphony. The
s on Third Symphony receives the
Jar- tightest, most reflective playing
that that never, as it so easily can, be-
rest comes maudlin. Only the Fourth
t five Symphony begins to show the
n. In Szell shortcomings: the first
ne of movement, for instance, is cner-
jazz vated by a slow tempo and lack
pique, of tension.
nd a Wonderfully transparent, the
s. Columbia sound reveals with clar-
backs, ity the most subtle interior voices,
price yet never distorts at the highest
dynamic levels. (D3L 358)
5 V ~ DIAL
8-6416
r a Fourth Week !
CADEMY AWARDS INCLUDING
IRE OF THE VEARI
AND
BEST DIRECTOR-Fred Zinnemann
BESTACTOR-Paul Scofield
BEST SCREENPLAY FROM
ANOTHER MEDIUM-Robert BoltI
BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY (Color)
BEST COSTUME DESIGN (Color)
COLUMBIA PICTURES presents
FRED ZINNEMANN'S
tAi
i4 ,

Senate Appropriations Committee tors met with R
would probably just cut the sum months ago anda
raised out of the budget." reform was morei
Hannah has claimed a "crisis" appropriations for

Romney several'
agreed that tax
important than
a single year.

Call for Greater Student Role
In Campus Matters at Brown

Phone 434-0190
E1 c Of CARPENTER RO S
FIS NOW S

HOWING

FIRST
RUN

The Area's Finest Drive-in is 1
easy to reach-2 miles south
of Washtenaw Rd. on Carpenter.
BOX OFFICE
OPEN 6:45 P.M.

A

A Brown, 'University student-
faculty committee has called for
a University Council on Student
Affairs to provide a greater stu-
dent role in campus decisions.
The committee, appointed last
November by Brown President
Ray L. Haffner, has been exam-
ining the present social system
at the university. The investiga-
tion was prompted by the dismis-
sal of a student at Pembroke,
Brown's sister school, and by the
creation of two new faculty com-
mittees.

The committee recommended a
council to be made up of three
Brown students, two Pembroke
students, one graduate student,
three faculty members, and three
deans.
The council would propose all
rules of conduct for students cov-
ering such issues as partial hours,
liquor, drugs and curfews. In some
cases, they would sit as a disci-
plinary committee.
The proposal still must be ap-
proved by both Haffner and thej
corporation that owns the uni-
versity.

SHOWN AT 7:35 & 11:10
'PANAISIONANo COLOR4I...J

0

A

ALSO
WITHNCDEA
TECHNICOLORO

Is a Dazzling,
Suspense Experience
Started by a Girl
Who Never Pulled
Down the Shades
Shown at 9:25 Only

Plus-"WILD WATER CHAMPS"-In Color
COLOR CARTOON

tk O

W%

y' ?

Mo,;~l" W>M-I-* RI

CHARLES K. FELDMAN
presents
A FAMOUS ARTISI
AMONG OTHERS
PETER SELLERS .: ,
URSULA ANDRESS
DAVID NIVEN
WOODY ALLEN
JOANNA PEHTEI
.
ORSON WELLESr
OALIAHI.AVI 4
DEBORAH KERRB :. il
WILLIAM HOLDEN
CHARLES BOYER
JEAN-PAUL DELMONDO
GEORGE RAFTI i
JOHN HOSION}o
GUEST STARS
r TERENCE COOPERD ~#j.
BARBARA BOUCHET I Ii
WITH
abrilla d&#t
Iracey Crisp .,

Isis

5PRODUCTION LTO,
it 1ostr


A

,mW'W I A %. 011B

i action,.

S'1

JEROME WEIDMAN
ay wright
A rrive
)Morrow

I

'laywright Jerome Weidman
1 arrive here tomorrow for final
earsals of his new play, "Ivory
ver," which will premiere May
14 at Mendelssohn' Theatre.
e Professional Theatre Program
duction will feature Hurd Hat-
.d.
'erformances will be at 8:30'
. Wednesday through Sunday
h 2:30 matinees- Saturday and
iday. Tickets for the play are
,ilable at the PTP ticket office
Mendelssohn Theatre from 10
.-i p-m. and from 2-5 p.n.
nday through Friday.
Veidman won the -Pulitzer,
ny and Broadway Drama
tics awards for "Fiorello!"
nes Yaffe, co-author of "Ivory
wer," will also be here for the
al rehearsals. Yaffe adapted
Broadway production of Duer-
matt's "The Deadly Game"
I has written plays for tele-
on and movie screenplays. He
also a novelist.

THE EASTERN MICHIGAN
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
presents
Sheridan's '
comedy,
of manners
MAY 10-15
Seats $1.50. Res., HU 2-3453
Curtain 8 p.m.; Sun. Mat. 2 p.m.

AL
SEASO NS
From the pay 1y ROBER BOLT -TCHNIcOLOR
Mon. thru Fri. to Sat. and Sun. at
7:00 and 9:15 1:00-3:15-7:00-9:15

I

cxcitcincnt!o
tu1 Y
Un*1 w

A9

Elaine Taylor
Angela Scoular

S#f1in

4

r

: .w r -

Hombre

means man...
Paul Newman is

4

AVIV
-AMPRI

T1

J
presents
"he Marx
Brothers
oucho, Chico, Harpo,
ippo, and Gummo)
in
h'e Coconuts~

1

(Gr
Z

I

Co1um1a PiCtUFS

TI

!

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