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May 06, 1967 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1967-05-06

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MAY 5, 1867

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

MAY 5, 1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAEE

4LJ"J

Seeks

To Postpone
Rail Strike
Asks Ban on Walkout
Until 1969, Voluntary
Wage Settlement
WASHINGTON (N) - President
Johnson proposed yesterday a law
forbidding a nation-wide railroad
strike until 1969 by seeking a
voluntary wage agreement if pos-
sible but providing for compulsory
settlement if necessary.
"It represents the slightest pos-
sible intrusion upon the process
of collective bargaining," John-
son said in a message to Congress.
Secretary of Labor W. Willard
Wirtz insisted at a White House
briefing that the proposed legis-
lation would not amount to com-
pulsory arbitration to force a
settlement.
Johnson Plan
Both railroad and union spokes-
men criticized the Johnson plan,
but the industry said it won't op-
pose the legislation.
Spokesmen for the six shop craft
Sunions in the dispute indicated
they wouldput up stiff opposition
*in 'Congress.'
Johnson's proposal would create
a five 'man White House board to
exert intensive efforts to win a
voluntary agreement, and then im-
posing binding terms if this fails.
The board's proposals, if there
was no agreement within 90 days,
would go into effect for two years
retroactive to last Jan. 1.
The unions and the railroads
could keep bargaining for a dif-
ferent agreement, but any strike
or lockout would be banned by the
4law.
Firm Hope
"It Is the President's deep and
firm hope that the parties will be
able to reach a settlement in this
dispute during the first 30 days,"
said Joseph Califano, White House
assistant.
Wirtz and Califano called the
plan "extended negotiation and
mediation to a finality," and de-
scribed it as unique, to collective
bargaining.
"Mediation to finality is still
compulsory arbitration, which is
foreign to the American way of
life," said P. L. 'Roy Semiller,
president of the AFL-CIO Inter-
national Association of Machinist.
Meany Opposes
AFL - CIO President George
Meany branded Johnson?s proposal
! as compulsory arbitration and said
"we shall therefore vigorously op-
pose this as well as any ,other
legislative proposal which calls for
compulsory arbitration of the is-
sues in dispute."
Meany' said that If the public
interest in continued operation of
the railroads overrides the rights
of the workers "then the railroads
should be operated for the public
interest and not for private profit.
We would therefore regard seizure
legislation pending the negotia-
tion of a settlement as the fairest
and least oppressive alternative"
Johnson said in his message to
Congress "the situation does not
warrant seizure by the government
of the railroad properties."

Bowles Sees
Undermining
Of India Aid
Communist Forgeries
Used Against U.S.
Role in India, Pakistan
NEW DELHI, India (A) -- U.S.
Ambassador Chester Bowles sees
a Communist effort to undermine
American efforts to help India.
Writing in the American Report-
er, a weekly published by the U.S.
Information Service, he charged,
"international character assassi-
nation."
Bowles' statement says the pre-
sent targets are the Peace Corps,
whose volunteers are called "spies"
and "saboteurs", and American
wheat shipments which are said
to be a "plot to undermine Indian
self reliance."
American, British and West
German sources say forgeries have
been introduced in the campaign
in both India and Pakistan.
Obvious Forgery
One of the most obvious forger-
ies was a news release mailed to
Pakistan newspapers under the
letterhead of the International
Press Service, said to be a com-
mercial news organization in West
Berlin.
In a story datelined Dacca, East
Pakistan, the release said the
United States and other Western
powers could be expected to assist
the development of a new united
and independent nation formed
from eastern India and East Pak-
istan. The story was printed by a
Karachi newspaper in late Decem-
ber.
Later Mainstream, a leftist per-
iodical, published a map titled
"United States of Bengal" pur-
porting to show American plans
for unifying East Pakistan with
India's West Bengal, Assam and
Nagaland, plus Sikkim and Bhu-
tan, the two Indian protectorates
along the Communist China bor-
der.
Pravda, the Communist party
paper, in Moscow reported the
"plot" and said the Central In-
telligence Agency was behind it.
Pravda's report got play in one
prominent New Delhi newspaper.

FRESH BLOODSHED:
Chinese Wall Posters Reveal
Liu Plot To Overthrow Mao
HONG KONG (P)-A long de- count to date of a monumental capital that one faction mobilized
tailed wall newspaper in Peking power struggle which has been hundred of persons armed with
has reported that communist going on in communist China clubs and stones to prepare for
China's President Liu Shao Chi since late 1965. an attack from Mao's "revolution-
and his followers stockpiled arms From inside malnland China ary rebels." Other reports told of
and military equipment for a coup came fresh reports of bloddshed skirmishes in various other main-
to topple Mao Tse-tung from in the current "great proletarian land districts.
power and place former Mayor cultural revolution" launched by The poster brought to Hong
Peng Chen of Peking in control Mao to save his authority. Kong demands that Liu Shao Chi
of the Chinese Communist party., Japanese correspondents quoted
p y Jaanee crreponent qutedand his followers be condemned
Wall Newspaper wall newspapers in Peking as say- l deathl
The wall newspaper-a device ing more than 200 were killed ort h
of Mao's young Red Guards to wounded in Peking suburbs in According to the poster, the
carry attacks on his enemies was clashes between Mao's foes and coup attempt developed as a po-
brought to Hong Kong by a trav- his supporters Wednesday. litical move against Mao and grew
eler from Peking. It is considered The Tokyo newspaper Yomiuri into a military attempt. Peng
by experts the most revealing ac- reported from communist China's Chen, dumped from his positions
___as Politburo member and. mayor

3-.!'
';
'
;
'
S

Senate Committee Backs
Draft of 19-Year-Olds

-Associated Press
EXPELLED FROM SPAIN
Three American co-eds. students at Madrid University, were deported from Spain Wednesday on
charges. of participating in illegal anti-Vietnam war demonstrations which included burning of six
American flags. The girls are (left to right) Carol Watanabe, 23, of Honolulu, Robert Alexander,
20, of Los Angeles, Cal., and Karen Winn, 20, of Walnut Creek, Cal. The students were also
charged with participating in demonstrations against Spanish police practices. ,
Britain 's Colored Minortes
Trouble Common Market Bid

LONDON (AP)-Britain's swelling
colored population emerged yes-
terday as a major issue in the na-
tion's bid to join the European
Common Market.
The'question was raised in the
House of Commons. Lawmakers of
all parties demanded assurances
that all British citizens-black,
brown, yellow as well as white
Commonwealth immigrants-will
receive equal treatment in an en-
larged European Economic Com-
munity-EEC.
But Prime Minister Harold Wil-
son sidestepped the problem while
acknowledging that it "bristles
with difficulties." He promised to
deal with it fully when Parliament
Monday begins a three day debate
on Britain's application for EEC
membership. Wilson did under-
take, however, to discuss the issues
with the six EEC governments be-
fore settling the question of Brit-
ish 'entry.
In other developments on Brit-
ain's approach to Europe:
=-Government leaders reacted
cooly to signals from Paris that
President Charles de Gaulle in-
tends to take his time about re-
sponding to Britain's application.
The French leader, through
aides, has been at pains to reject
British suggestions that success
or failure of the approach depends
on him. British officials said this
was just what they expected.
-Wilson's men published offi-
cial estimates indicating food
prices in Britain will rise by 10
to 14 per cent if this country

adopts the agricultural policy and
system of the Common Market.
-A manifesto signed by 74 La-
borites Wednesday night came out
in flat opposition against British
entry. These lawmakers will be
permitted on grounds of con-
science to abstain in' the vote on
a motion supporting the govern-
ment's decision to apply for EEC
membership.
The color factor came up in
Parliament because of a provision

in the Rome treaty-setting up
EEC-which allows free and un-
fettered "mobility of labor" be-
tween member nations.
With this in mind, several leg-
islators asked Wilson if he had
discussed this issue with EEC lead-
ers, especially in the context of
the rights of Commonwealth im-
migrants in Britain.
Wilson replied he had not yet
discussed the question with EEC
leaders.

WASHINGTON (R') - The Sen-'
ate Armed Services Committee re-
commended yesterday that young-
er men starting at age 19 be in-
ducted ahead of older youths.
This reversal of the callup order
was proposed by President John-
son in a message to Congress on
revisions of the Selective Service
system.
In backing the proposal, Chair-
man Richard B. Russell (D., Ga.)
said there may be some difficul-
ties in changing over to a new
system. He said that for the first
year or two both 19-year-olds
and those in the 25 and younger
bracket would be subject to in-
duction.
Lukewarm Endorsement
The committee gave only luke-
warm endorsement to another
Johnson proposal. This calls for
the use of a lottery or random
selection system of inducting
youths and is backed by Selective
Service System director Gen. Lew-
is B. Hershey.
The lottery plan came under
fire at a hearing of a House Arm-
ed Services subcommittee, where
the U.S. Chamber of Commerce
argued for the present system of
giving local draft boards full au-
thority in determining w h o
should be called.
Both House and Senate com-
mittees have been working on leg-
islation to extend key sections of
the military draft law which are
due to expire June 30.
Questions Lottery
The Senate committee said it
would not oppose trying out a lot-
tery, which Johnson said would
be "a fair and impartial system
of random selection" of inductees.
But it questioned whether this
would "really result in a fairer
sharing of military service."
The Senate committeearecom-
mended retention by local draft
boards of their authority to class-
ify a person on the basis of the
facts in his particular case.
It said this permits a board to
disregard test scores or class
standings in passing on student
deferments.
Opposes Consolidation
The committee opposed a pro-
posal to consolidate the 4,000'"lo-
cal boards into a few hundred
area offices manned by civil ser-
vipe employes. It urged continu-

ation of the present setup with
only one change-that no local
board member be permitted to
serve longer than 10 years.
The Senate committee recom-
mended continuance of student
deferments until college students
receive undergraduate degrees or
reach 24 years, and extension of
the doctor draft to alien doctors
and dentists who are over 26.
Aliens now are subject to the reg-
ular draft from 18 to 26.

of Peking in mid 1966, had long
been close to President Liu, and
the poster contended that Liu,
through Peng, wanted to rule
China.
Army Chief
Accused along with the two was
Lo Jui Ching, the fallen army
chief of staff, Lu Ting Yi, a vice
premier who had been propa-
ganda chief until he was purged,
and Yang Shang Kun, who was
purged as a Politburo secretary.
The poster said the group stored
weapons, ammunition, gasoline
and oil, military uniforms, food
and medical 'supplies in arsenals
north and west of Peking, where
Liu might depend on provincial
officials loyal to him.

Argument Rages Over Danger
In Vietnam Demilitarized Zone

World News Roundup

By The Associated Press
CAPE KENNEDY, Fla. -Lunar
Oribter 4 rocketed moonward yes-
terday to photograph with scien-
tific detail more than 95 per cent
'of the moon's front space and
hidden backside in 'the most am-
bitious lunar survey yet at-
tempted.
The fiery Atlas Agena rocket,
which nearly had been grounded
by a troublesome rocket valve,
beat a race against the countdown
clock and blasted off at 6:25 p.m.
to start the flying photographic
laboratory on a planned 89 hour,
245,519 mile journey through
space.
ATHENS, Greece - The ruling
Greek army regime disbaned 281.
local clubs and organizations
throughout the country last night.
It gave no reason.
The sudden move by the army's
general headquarters in Athens
wiped out sports, political, social,
union and youth clubs apparently
considered to have been dominat-
ed by leftists or unrellables.
Observers saw it as another in-
dication of the coup installed
regime's dominance over Greek
life.
WASHINGTON - Sen. Russell
B. Long of Louisianapublicly apo-
logized yesterday for saying last
week half of the Senate ethics
committee members couldn't stand
an investigation like the one Sen.
Thomas J. Dodd went through.
w OM

WASHINGTON MP)-A strange
and shadowy battle has been
fought this week between faceless
military men and faceless diplo-
mats over the degree of danger the
United States .faces because of
Communist troop concentrations
around Vietnam's demilitarized
zone.
The dispute has centered over
the specific threat of a direct in-;
vasion of South Vietnam by the,
forces of North Vietnam, striking
through the boundary zone sepa-
rating the countries.
Some observers thought they
saw an effort on the part of mil-
itary men to take issue with diplo-
mats they regard as interfering in'
their business of defining strategic
problems.
Anonymous Diplomats
Others thought anonymous dip-
lomats were trying to present mil-
itary facts in a way to influence.
the debate over political issues as-
sociated with the war, particularly
the bombing of North Vietnam.
Officials who are supposed to be
familiar with the views of Sec-
retary of State Dean Rusk and
Secretary of Defense Robert S.
McNamara say they are in agree-
ment that the zone between North
and South Vietnam is a trouble
spot which could become far more
explosive, depending on what the
Communist do.
News stories last Friday attri
buted to State Department offi-
cials a feeling of concern over a
invasion by North Vietnam of
South Vienam across the demil-
itrized zone.
eA II
,ets

Published stories have said
Rusk often meets with newsmen
for a background talk on Friday
afternoons.
Situation Exaggerated
The State Department's warning
of an invasion threat was followed
by a series of stories attributed to
Pentagon or Defense Department
sources criticizing suchhtalk and
saying the situation had been
exaggerated. Tht result has been
to obscure the underlying facts of
perhaps the most active area of
the Vietnamese conflict.
However, inquiries put to high
officials indicate agreement on
these major points:
North Vietnam has an estimated
35,000 trained troops in and near
the demilitarized zone. Although
scattered over a relatively large
area, they possess the potential of
delivering powerful blows against

forces south of the zone.
The U.S. forces consist of
about 20,000 to 25,000 Marines
close to the demilitarized zone
with U.S. Army reinforcements to
the south.
One military man, the Marine
Corps commandant, Gen. Wallace
M. Greene, spoke publicly of the
Communist buildup around the
zone and said, "We may need ad-
ditional help inngetting this prob-
lem finally in hand."
North Vietnam penetrated the
buffer zone with its 324B Division
last fall and "we had to meet these
people head on and whip them,
fracture their organization and
drive them back into North Viet-
nam," he said.
"So we should be prepared to
make whatever effort is necessary
in ,order to meet these daily and
newly arising emergencies," Greene
said.

"FASCINATING!" Good Seats$1 and up

Long reiterated that he did not
think Dodd should be censured,
saying the Connecticut Democrat
has not violated any law or any
rule of the Senate.
*. * *
WASHINGTON - Government
scientists reported yesterday evi-
dence that a new and tough bri-
gade of common cold viruses may,
have been uncovered.
Reporting isolation of six new
novel type viruses from humans
beset with severe midwinter colds,
they said it's possible the newly
noted microbes may be respon-
sible for most of the severe colds
that humans suffer in winter.

President Johnson met with Selective Service Director Gen. Lewis
Hershey Wednesday after the President signed an executive
order extending from 10 to 30 days the time during which a draft
registrant may appeal his classification. Yesterday the Senate
Armed Services Committee approved Johnson's recommendation
that younger men be drafted ahead of older youths.
THE ECUMENICAL CAMPUS MINISTRY
invites you to an
INDIAN DINNER and FILM
Friday, May 5 at 6 P.M.
Featuring "Aparajito" (The Unvanquished)
Second in the award winning Aputrilogy by
SATYAJIT RAY
Place: Presbyterian Campus Center, 143; Washtenaw
Cost: Americans: $1.00 Foreign Students: 50c
Please make dinner reservations: 662-3580 662-5529

MICHIGAN PREMIERE
Wednesday evening, May 10, 1967
The happiest Motion Picture Of The Year!
UNIVERSAL presents
JULIE ANDREWS
AS MILLI
SINGING, DANCING, DELIGHTING
MARY TYLER M00ORE
CAROL CH-ANNING
JAMES FOX
in ROSS HUNTER'S production of
ee*rl~ioCLV MOLIRN MLLIE
TECHNICOLOR ERN M
costaEJHN GAVINand IBEATRICE LILLIE
as Mrs. Meers

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CINEI
pres

Jack Lemmon-Shirley MacLaine
in BILLY WILDER'S
THE APARTMENT
(CinemaScope and Color)
ACADEMY AWARDS-Best Picture, Best Director,
Best Screenplay and Story, Best Editing.
N.Y. FILM CRITICS AWARDS-Best Picture,

PRICE & PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE
Evenings: Monday through Saturday at 8:15 P.M.
Sunday at 7:30 P.M.
Matinees: Wednesday, Saturday & Sunday at 2:00 P.M.
Wednesday Matinee Tickets $1.50 and $2.25
Saturday, Sunday, Holiday Matinee Tickets: $1.80 and $2.50
-All Evening Performances: Tickets at $2.25 & $3.00
FOR GROUP SALES AND SPECIAL THEATRE PARTY INFORMATION
CALL DONNA YOZDIC, UN. 2.8103
------ -- ------------- -
t )WRTLAND THEATRE-IS0 1: L Hudson rDv&-4 utl fsled
Please send metickets for
(LOCATION) (DATE)I
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