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June 10, 1967 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1967-06-10

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PAGE TWO

THE MICIGAN DlAILYV

~ i Y .

K7.iM is V JLU"A7 1 , d 1.

Day light Ruling

Returns

END GRADE STANDARD:
Proposed Alteration of Draft Law
Eases Student Deferment Criteria

To

Bo

LANSING (AP)-The State, Su-
preme Court yesterday tossed the
red hot controversial time tissue'
back to the Board of State Can-
vassers.
Atty. Gen. Frank Kelley has'
ruled that the instant the can-
vassers officially certify the peti-
tions seeking a November, 1968,
election on the time issue, the
state automatically will go on
Eastern Daylight Saving Time.
Certifying the time issue for the
ballot, Kelley held, suspends the
law to keep Michigan on Eastern
Standard Time, enacted by the
pegislatrue and signed by the
Governor.
Robert F. Montgomery, state
elections director, meanwhile was
making telephone calls to see if
three of the four-member Board of
Canvassers could be rounded up

ard of
to meet today and settle the issue.
Montgomery said there "was a,
possibility but not a probability"
the canvassers might be able to
get together for the today's meet-
ing.
"If they are willing to come in
on Saturday; we could be making
a switch to daylight saving time
as of Saturday midnight," Mont-
gomery said.
Political Ball Game
"The ball game isn't over yet,"
insisted Attorney Tom Downs.
Downs reported the Farm Bureau
and bowling alley and theater in-
terests that oppose certification
of the referendum petitions to en-
able the time switch that would
push clocks one hour ahead.
Down said because there were
so many federally-related issues
involved, he might theoretically

have the right to appeal to the
U.S. Supreme Court.
'He also said he plans to argue
against the validity of the peti-
tions when the canvassers do
meet.
Pressed for Time'
Downs said he would have to
consult with his sponsors before
deciding whether to make any
further legal moves. He added he
probably would be pressed for
time and would have to act before
the canvassers meet.
Seven members of the State Su-
preme Court handed the time issue
back to the canvassers after hear-
ing oral arguments from both
sides yesterday morning.
The judges then huddled to-
'gether for an hour and a half
before issuing' their order,
Unanimous Order
Harry F. Kelly, acting chief
justice in the absence of Chief
Justice John R. Dethmers; read
the order, noting it was unani-
mous.
The order stated:
"It is ordered that the plain-
tiff's complaint for mandamus and
injunctive relife, brought here for
determination by the court's order
of May 23, 1967, is denied. The
court's order staying the board of
state canvassers from making of-
ficial determination of the sul-

ficiency of such referendary peti-
tion is dissolved. An opinion or
opinions will follow."
Main Argument
The main argument offered by
Downs was that Congress specified
the time change should be made
on the last Sunday in April. This
was not done in Michigan.
A referendum, he also contend-
ed, should legally be sought only
90 days after adjournment of the
Legislature. He further claimed
the petition forms were incorrect,
mostly on the grounds they con-
tained a lengthy explanation on
the first sheet.
Robert Derengoski, state solici-
tor general, said Congress had spe-
cified the states could exempt
themselves from coming under
Daylight Saving Time by law. {
The referendum, he said, is a
part of the due process of law.
Derengoski cited an opinion
from a three-judge federal panel
in Detroit which denied an in-
junction sought to prevent the
canvassers from acting on the
petitions.
One of the federal judges said,
he reported, that "the court was
not convinced the Congress did
not know of the referendum pro-
cess."
This ,he said, is support of the
legality of the referendum.

Editors Note-Scores of pro-
posed changes in the nation's
military draft law have been
bandied about in recent months.
Now congressional negotiators
have reached agreement on a
proposed new law expected to
win final approval soon. Here,
in question and answer form,
are details of how the proposed
plan would work.- I
WASHINGTON () - The pro-
posed new military draft law Con-
gress is whipping into shape
makes it easier for college students
to win deferment.
And it permits President John-
son to go ahead with his an-
nounced plan to put 19-year-olds
at the top of the available man-
power pool. The present procedure
drafts men inverse order or age
from 25-years-olds on down. But
Vietnam war d e m a n d s have
brought the age of inductees down
to 19 or 20 in many draft board
districts already.
The proposed new law, approved
this week by Senate and House
conferees, would go into effect for
four years starting July 1.
It also provides for a speed-up
in settling appeals from local draft
board decisions, preserves the vir-
tual autonomy of local draft
boards and prohibits the President
from changing the present selec-
tion system without another law.
Johnson had proposed a nationall

Canvassers

lottery plan of random selection.
College students who now must
make a case before their local
draft board to obtain a deferment
-and then stay in the top half of
their class to keep the deferment
hereafter would be deferred -as a
matter of legal right if they re-
quest.
And they wouldn't have to
maintain a high scholastic stand-
ing. They would have to keep up
with their classes and meet the
academic and other standards of
their school.
Here are some of the questions
most often asked about the pro-
posed new law and the answers as
supplied by congressional draft
experts:
Q. What basic change would the
new law make?
A. The major change affects
students. The proposed new law
would require draft boards to
grant' deferments upon request for
undergraduate students pursuing
fulltime courses and meeting their
schools' academic and other re-
quirements.
The deferment would be a mat-
ter of right. The old law left it to
the discretion of draft boards and
conditioned the defermention the
registrant remaining in the upper
half of his class.
Deferment Duration
Q. How long would the defer-
ment last?
A. It would end when the stu-
dent completed his undergraduate
work, left school or reached age
24, whichever comes first. But, if
he became 24 in the middle of an
academic year, he would be al-'
lowed to complete the'year.
Q. What would happen after a
student completes his undergrad-

Regulations for graduate student group, preceded by students whose
deferments will be issued by the temporary deferments have ex-
President. He has indicated defer- pired. Top priority now are the
ments will be limited to qualified 25-year-olds.
medical or dental students or 19-Year-Olds
others pursuing schooling in fields Q. What are the chances of
of critical need. being drafted at age 19?
Even these regulations are not A. Statistics show that about two
binding on draft boards but they of eveiry seven persons now eligible
usually are followed. for induction actually are drafted.
Transfers The Pentagon expects to meet all
Q. Would a deferred student lose of its monthly draft requirements
his deferment if he transferred from the 19-year-old group and
from one school to another? from students whose deferments
A. No. have ended.
Q. Does the proposed new law Q. If a young man isn't drafted
affect the status of registrants I at age 19, what are the prospects
studying for the ministry? for being inducted later?
A. No. Divinity students will,1 fr egdted ater?
continue to have a legal deferment A. If he gets past 19 and world
so long as they continue their stu- conditions don't get worse, his
dies. If they abandon them after chances of not being inducted are
passing their 26th birthday, they very good. A new crop of 19-year-
are liable for induction until they will go into the eligibility
reach 36. pool ahead of him.
Q. Does it make any changes in Q. What provision would affect
the present priority, categories for conscientious objectors?
induction? A. This category would be based
A. No these priorities are de- only on religious training and be-
termined by local draft boards un- lief. It could not include essential-
der presidential regulations. The ly political, sociological or philo-
President has said top priority for sophical beliefs or a merely per-
induction will be the 19-year-old sonal mdral code.
New 'Print ShopA ttracts
Local Art Enthusiasts

Delicate Airplane Artwork
Auctioned by N.Y.'s Christie

(Continued from Page 1)
Lot 1 (one of the Scouts) went
for $800 'ton a manfroma elc-
tronics company. Lot 2 (plans for
the Scout)-$85. Lot 3 (the Fok-
ker Triplane)-$1000 to the elec-
tronics man again. Lot 4 (second
Scout)-$750 to a Mr. Moss. Lots
5 and 6 (plans)-$80 .and $45.
Lot 7 (a tailplane assembly)-$130.
Lot 8 (the crashed Scout dating
back to Independence Day)-$100.
Lot 9 (a huge facsimile of the
model box)-$550.
Time: about one minute per lot.
The casualness of the bidding
disturbed no one.
A small, but lucrative, drama
then erupted. Mr. Moss could not
pay or was non-existent, The bid-
ding re-started at $600, the elec-
tronics man again to the fore,
with his straw hat in one hand
and the other rising slowly to top
each bid. Claus Oldenberg (the
painted sculptor of 'hamburger'
and 'slice of cake' fame) had de-
cided that the Scout would make
a fine addition to his collection.
The electronics man dropped
out, while Rauschenberg took up
the bidding, which then took on
the aura of 'Monopoly' rather

than real business. The two art-
ists fought it out alone, with the
solitary exception of an interjec-
tion from Mrs. Oldenberg, out-
bidding her husband. In the end:
"To Mr. Oldenberg for $1450."
Art or toys? Everybody agreed
that the planes, David Haxton's
box and Mary Ashley's magnifi-
cent plans on some sort of silvered
material, were beautiful construc-
tions. And in this case you can't
say that "my five year old son
could have done better."
In the final analysis we have to
note that the planes are sc4led-
up models (not scaled-down
planes) and are simplified in a
number of ways-no covering, en-
signias or other embellishments.
They stand there as skeletons.
They have a subtle monumental-
ity, the two-thirds scale bringing
them down to a human scale
which contradicts their massive-
ness.
Maybe it was only the strange-
ness of the inspiration that made
us say "toys."
After accepting this strangenses
I find a whole world of formal
elegance, beauty and humor,
which does not deny toy-element,
but rather interacts with it.

9

FILMS
'La Fuga' Mosaic Tells- Story

qjj r rustratea '1 mmna

By BARBARA HOCKMAN
In the beginning we hear a
woman told there is nothing she
can do about the situation; in
the end a man questions the good
of knowing the truth.
"La Fuga" is another film about
a person unable to love, and it
handles this question with a deli-
cate understanding. Somehow it
has managed to hide judgment be-
tween the lines from where we
must derive it ourselves.
Piero is the child of La Dolce

+ DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
,1K.4\'Jr' MJJ " :.Mt~t~u "rMr,:." Lt : ::v J %V: J "W"."v."" .". "," JJh " ." f 4~h M " rs

Vita. Yet, her life has none of
the sweetness, hypocritical that
it may be, of her parents. She
lives in lavish insecurity, har-
boring well-hidden guilt and frus-
tration. The woman at the be-
ginning and the man at the end
of the film (Anouk Aimee and
Paul Guers) seem to have the love
for Piero (Giovanni Ralli) that
she seeks but will not accept.
Although the psychiatrist's
couch reveals the mosaic picture
of her life to us, that inner knowl-
edge is finally rejected by im-
patient Piero. But before she ends
herself in some unknown "trage-
dy," we have witnessed meaning-
ful slices of her unfulfilled days.
For these, the hackneyed modes
of diary-flashbacks, interspersed
with some Bermanesque dream se-
quences, are used with a magnifi-
cent novelty and freshness.
Still, we are not seeing her
through any eyes but the cam-
era's. And the cameras are so
sharp and yet so inconspicuous, in-
advertently determined, that see-
ing this movie is like reading a
flowing novel where all pictorial
images are formulated within our
own minds. The precise dialogue
has a literary quality what is
mouthed by each character is pe-
culiar to him, highly expressive of
his significance in the story.
Andrew's words are the strict,
terse intellectualism which help
Piero to feel unloved by her phys-
ics professor husband. "To An-
drew, everything is clear and rea-
sonable . . . I am groping in the
dark," she says.

uatc work or becomes 24?
A. He immediately returns to
'the pool of registrants most likely
Is it her fault? Is she the ig- to be inducted and would remain
norant, incapable mother she ac- ; in that status for one year.
cnses herself of being? Additional Deferment
Dr. Borghi (Enrico Mario Saler-Q. Could such a student get an-
Dr. orgmchiEnr bouario er- other deferment?
no) knows much more about Piero A. The new law says there shall
than he will tell Andrew. He knows be no further deferment except
the faults of Andrew in the rela- for extreme hardship. Being a
tinshodhiishe knows Piero's husband or father would not give
childhood history-the central, him an automatic deferment.
brutal facts of child and parental Q. Does the proposed new stu-
love, which form one's habits as dent deferment procedure apply
standing. "There are no frigid only to future students or does it
well as neuroses. His words com- affect those already in school?
bine jargon with brotherly under- A. It would apply to all.
women, only sexually immature Q What would happen to a
ones," he advises. Why couldn't he student who becomes 24 before
help the helpless woman? completing his four years of un-
At the close of this tightly com- dergraduate work?
pact, smoothly complex film, the A. He would be eligible for im-
psychiatrist tells the physicist, mediate induction.
both in front of a nuclear power Q. Would a registrant deferred
plant, that when man can control for undergraduate work be eligible
his unconsciousness, he will have for a graduate deferment?
true power. A. Not as a matter of right.

By GAIL SMILEY
There's a new gallery at 2131
E. Washington. It's The Print
Shop, owned by Peggy Pater Ben-
nett and Lloyd Cross.
The Print Shop is a place to go.
They have etchings, lithographs,
engravings, woodcuts, serigraphs'
and experiments in art of all
kinds. On exhibit now are works
from Cramer, Ecker, Haxton, Pas-
co, Pater, Ross, Simpson, Eding,
Read, Lahti, Wright, Ettinger, and
Beaver.
For Rent
But the most exciting thing
about the Print Shop is that it's
a place to go and work and talk
about art with artists. There are
studios available for renting and
a workshop with facilities for
etching, silkscreen, and woodcuts.
There's a new Renaissance of
arts happening at the gallery.
Artists in all fields are in and out
talking abut new things to do. A
strong quartet ' directed by Bob
Whetman now conducting at In-

terlochen will perform in the fall.
There's a nightly gathering of
writers, painters, musicians, and
film-makers drinking coffee on
the house and talking, talking,
talking until 11 p.m.
Dorothea Suino is working on a
film done partly in The Print
Shop. She is the wife of Mark
Suino, University professor of
Russian. The film will be shown at
the gallery in early August. George
Manupelli, University professor of.
arts, has offered a film as dona-
tion to The Print Shop.
The Print Shop plans to make
facilities available for anyone in-
terested in performing. The Ron
Brooks Trio will be there soon.
Peggy Bennett reports great suc-
cess in this new, exciting cultural
adventure. The community of
scholars and artists contributing
their efforts free of charge and
available for consultation are
Mary Ellen Sedgeman, Gina Rice,
Fran Wright, Linda Fowler and
Rozalind Beach.

a1

Phone 434-0130
,AiaaaOn CARPENTER ROA"

The- Area's Finest Drive-In is easy
to reach - 2 miles south of
Washtenaw Rd. on Carpenter.
BOX OFFICE
OPEN 7:00 P.M.

The Daily 'Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of 1Michigan for which The
Michigan. Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 ,p.m. Friday
for Satarday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a mai-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organiaston notices are not
accepted for pubicat ion. For more
information call 764-970.
SATURDAY, JUNE 10
Day Calendar
University Players Children's Theatre
-"Nobody Loves a Dragon." Today
and tomorrow, 2 p.m., Trueblood Aud.
Cinema Guild - "The Incredible
Shrinking Man": Architecture Aud., 7
and 9:05 p.m.
General Notices
Student Government Council Approval
of the following student sponsored
events becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All pub-
licity for these events must' be with-
held until the approval has become ef-
fective.
Approval request forms for student
sponsored events are available in Room
1011 of the SAB.
Hiller Foundation, Fishbowl table,
June 9, 12 and 13, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Fish-
bowl.
Doctoral Examination for Marshall
August Walcat, Jr., Chemistry; thesis:
"Studies of Fission-Product 152Pm and
152Nd," Sat., June 10, Room 3005 Chem-
istry, at 9 a.m. Chairman, H. C. Griffin.
Doctoral Examination for John
Matthew Potter, English Language &
Literature; thesis: "Andrew Marvell's
Latin Poetry," Sat., June 10, Austin
Warren's residence, 848 E. University,
at 9:15 a.m. Chairman, Austin' Warren.

Doctoral Examination for Kenneth
Eugene Biesinger, Fisheries; thesis:
"Micronutrients as Possible Factors
Limiting Primary Productivity in Cer-
tain Alaskan Lakes," Sat., June 10,
Room 1032 Natural Resources, at 1
p.m, Chairman, K. F. Lagler.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
General Motors Styling Staff, Gi
Technical Center, Warren, Mic.--Sec-
retary to Personnel Director, short-
hand necessary for labor negotiations
meeting minutes, other varied duties.
City of High Point, N.C.-Personnel
'Director, also serves as admin. asst. to
City Mgr., man, young, with or without
grad work. Pref. 'MA in public admin.,
poll. sei. bkgd., prefer some exper. in
municipal field or personnel work
Manufacturers Life Insurance Co.,
Southfield, Mich.-2 Trainees for Mar-
keting Dev. Program, start at South-
field branch, extensive trng. of 2 yrs.,
go into mgmt., admin., brokerage,
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES

head office work or sales MBA, MA
poli. sci., or econ., prefer single, under
30.
Uni-Royal, Inc., Allen Park, Mich.
-Programmers and Systems Analysts
for new 360 IBM system Will train,
some exper. preferred, not necessary
for programmers, computer oriented
men or women, BS/BA Bus. Ad.,
Mktg., Mgmt., Engrg., Math and others.
New Holland, Division of Sperry Rand
Corp., Grand Island, Neb.-Industrial
Engrs. Recent graduate with few yrs.
exper Prefer IE exper. in work meas-
urement, methods improvement, and
cost reduction, may assume project re-
sponsibilities.
Management Consultants, Chicago,
II1.-Vice-president for major firm in
aircraft-aerospace manufacturing in-
dustry, 40-50 yrs., degree in Aero. En- j
grg., 10 yrs. exper. in positions of highi
responsibility.
*~ * *
For further information please call
764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAB.

m

,.,, .

im

"BOLD IN PRESENTING
FACETS OF AMOUR, ILLICIT
AND OTHERWISE! A REFLEC-
TION OF MORAL DECAY...STARKLY,
! CFTEN EROTICALLY
REVEALEDI SHOCKING
...!9RESTING, SERIOUS
DRAMA!" -Weiler, New York Times
ADULT MOTIONPICTURE FROM SWEDEN)
lffriffb rMAI ZETTERUNG ,'wreawdb* PROMNENT FILMS
DIAL
NOW 8-641 6

FIRST NC
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GET OUT OF
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After Sophocles, Yeats, Growtowski, Artraud, et al
OEDIPUS RED
from LUGG'S PLAYERS

USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-j
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available in
Room 1011 SAB.
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw, Sun., June 11, 9:45 a.m.
'worship service with Pastor Scheips,,
"Christianity and Life's Anxieties," 11
a.m., Bible class on "Christian Per- -
sonality."
Lutheran Student Chapel, Hill St. at
Forest Ave, Sun., June 11, 10 a.m.,
worship service; 11:15 a.m. discussion
group; supper and program at Campus
Chapel, 1236 Washtenaw. Speaker, di-
rector of Office of Economic Oppor-
tunity-"Poverty Program&is it Work-
ing?" '

June 13, 14, 1S-7:30 P.M;
June 16-7:30 & 9:30 P.M.

CANTERBURY
HOUSE

ii

Tickets from Centicore Bookshop, S.U.
"Plaster of Paris" Boutique, Maynard/E. William
And at Door

GmICIGA.

NOW
DI AL 5-6290

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Guest Star
ENRICO MARIA SALERNO
D.irete by PAOLO SPINOLA
Produced by VIJIORIO MIJSY OLORlI

NOT ALL LOVE AFFAIRS HAPPEN BETWEEN MAN AND WOMAN.,

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