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June 02, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1967-06-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

rr.

TUE MICRICAN DAILY

FRIDAY, JUNE 2, 1'96'7

0 THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRJDAY, JUNE 2,1967

!" .0

OGANS EFFECTIVE:
NLF, Saigon's

Land-Reform Programs

Compete for Loyalty of Viet Peasantry

AIGON (P)-"To the tillers be-
gs the soil."
Destroy the feudal land bar-
Food grown by the people's
at belongs to the people, not
capitalist landlord."
Ch r o u g h o u t underdeveloped
ds of the world, Communists
ke powerful use of these and
ilar slogans in bidding for the
ular support vital to any Viet-
n-style insurgency.

The figures are subject to chal-
lenge, but the Viet Cong claims to,
have seized nearly 2.3-million
acres from landlords and to have
turned them over to the peasants.
Farmers make up 80 per cent of
Vietnam's population and without
their support no effective victory
is possible here.
Despite Saigon claims of action
in land reform, U.S. officials cite
figures to indicate Premier Nguyen
Cao Ky has turned over only about

20,000 new acres duringl
two years in office.

his nearly

--Associated Press
ADDRESSES CONVENTION
en. Mark Hatfield (%-Ore.), right, talks with H. Franklin
aschall, president of the Southern Baptist Convention, prior to
Idressing the convention yesterday at Miami Beach. Hatfield
rged Christians to support world peace efforts.
I0D PROBLEM:
Inlto Imp eris
Vi etam Economy

The evidence is that little has
been done about land reform since
President Ngo Dinh Diem fell in
1963.
Diem expropriated 229,000 acres
from French estate owners and
another 1.12 million from land-
lords who held in excess of 247
acres.
He distributed much of the best
land to government figures and
those whose loyalty he considered
important in the countryside. In
all some 645,000 acres were passed
out.
Often Ineffective
Many men with large holdings
split them among their families
and turned over to the government
mostly marginal or nonproductive
land.
Ky's regime has issued some
200,000 titles confirming Diem's
reform. The recipients only had
temporary title before.
There are still about 800,000
icres of land to be sold from the
Diem edicts before 1963. About
half is rated ascultivatable.
"What has never been but must'
now be recognized by the Viet-
namese government is that only a
real revolution in the countryside
can bring victory over the Com-
munists," an American source has
commented.
Maj. Gen. Nguyen Duc Thang,
head of the government's em-
battled pacification p r o g r a m,
echoed the view and said: "It is no
good to try to tell the people that
the Communists are bad."
"We must show them we can do
more for them and give them a
better life. This must not only be
in relationship to past regimes but
also better than the life the Com-
munists promise."
Ky is given good marks for in-
tentions by some Americans. They
point out that he must battle cen-
turies-old, Mandarin-style econ-
omic exploitation in the country-
side.
The members of this society are
CORRECTION
In Andrew Lugg's review of
f "Playboy of the Western World"
yesterday, all the references to
Shawn Keogh (John Moran) in .
fact refer to Christy Mahon
(Mark Metcalf), The error is
consistent throughout the ar-
ticle, so that readers should
now appreciate that it was Met-
calf's performance that was be-
ing endorsed. Apologies to all
concerned.-Ed.

powerful men and pay money in
the right places to insure that re-
forms don't threaten their way
of life.
These elements were strong
enough to emasculate efforts to
write tough land-reform legisla-
tion into Vietnam's new constitu-
tion.
Peasants Unaware
Few peasants in the South are
aware of government land policies
made in Saigon, let alone those of
North Vietnam.
Interviews with peasants in an
area where the government re-
cently distributed many titles
showed most feel that land reform
is only for those with money or
power.
Most said they knew of no one
who had actually received land.
They were certain neither they nor
their sons would ever get any.
The government sells its re-
formed land on an average for
about $80 an acre, a sum few pea-
sants could hope to amass under
the present tenant-farming sys-
tem.
Few realize that Saigon gives
farmers 12 years to pay for the
land and charges no interest.
Despite a government law set-
ting rent ceilings at 25 per cent of
tht annual crop, rents commonly
are 30 to 50 per cent or higher.
Not all this violates the spirit
of the law.
Eat Seed
Most peasants are too poor to
buy fertilizer and some have to
eat their seed to stay alive. The
landlord has to provide it, at a
price.
Or the peasant can borrow
money. Interest rates of 10 per
cent a month are common.
Billions of U.S. aid dollars since
1954 have altered little for pea-
sants. Half of the seven million
acres of farm land are worked by
tenants.
There is some running room in
the land problem for many areas.
The war has become so fierce that
the peasants caught in the middle
worry most about staying alive.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available in
Room 1311 SAS.
* * *.
Folk Dance Club (WAA), Folk dance
with instruction open to everyone, Fri.,
June 2, 8-11 p.m., Barbour Gym.

DAILY OFFICI
The Daily Official Bulletin is an 1
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-i
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Satarday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a mai-
mum of two times on request; fay
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.
FRIDAY, JUNE 2
Day Calend tar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar-"How to Develop and Manage an
Effective Wage and Salary Program":
Third Floor Conference Room of the
Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m. to 3:15 p.m.
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar-"Managerial Problems of Oper-
ating Production Standards System":
Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m. to 3:15 p.m.
Dept. of Electrical Engineering Sem-
inar-"Annual Research Review": Rack-
ham Bldg., 9 a.m.
Cinema Guild-"Duck Soup" : Archi-
tecture Aud., 7 and 9:05 p.m.
University Players-Dept. of Speech -
Presents "The Playboy of the Western
World," Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, 8
p.m.
General Notices
Doctoral Examination for Victor Roy
Wilbee, Education; thesis: "The Reli-
gious Dimensions of Three Presidencies
in a State University: Presidents Tap-
pan, Haven and Angell at the Univer-
sity of Michigan," Fri., June 2, West
Council Room, Rackham Graduate
School, at 10 a.m. Chairman, W. W.
Jellema.
Doctoral Examination for William Fred
Johnston. Forestry; thesis: "Effect of
Vegetation and Surface Condition on
Artificial Reproduction of Black Spruce
in a 'Deforested Swamp in North-Cen-
tral Minnesota," Mon.. June 5, Board
Room, Rackham Graduate School, at
2 p.m. Chairman, S. H. Spurr.
Phone 431-0130
EatauOm.CARPENTER ROAD
FIRST OPEN 7:00 P.M. FIRST
RUN NOW SHOWING RUN
SHOWN AT 8 35 & 12:30
ALSO-
COLOR
Shown
at
11:00 Only
PLUS- :SULKIES & SILKS"
COLOR CARTOON

AL BULLETIN
CINEMA II
STUDY OPPORTUNITY: Presents
Illinois Institute of Technology, Chi-
cago, Ill.-Graduate programs in Mgmt. i NGM A B RGM N'
and Econ. leading to MS, MBA and PhD1NGMAR BERGMAN S
in these fields. Masters levels are open
in both day and evening divisions. Lim-
ited acceptance, apply now for '67-8
eWILD
POSITION OPENINGS:
Ohio National Life Insurance Co,
Cincinnati, Ohio - Assistant General
whoun-el experienced corporateatty.,
wih5-8 yrs., life ins, legal work, em-
phasis on mortgage loan, securities. etc.
Methods Supv., mid 20-30 man inter-
ested in MBA work, computer apprecia- "us .bat.lwidelyaccimed QS
tion helpful. Group Sales Representa- "S ahnl euiu ieY acamd a
tive, travel in 500 mile territory, de- his masterpiece,"-Time
gree required. Assistant internal audi-
tor, new grad, acctg. major with 1-2
yrs. auditing. "One of the few great motion pictures of our
Anti-Tuberculosis League of Cleve-
land and Cuyahoga County, Ohio - time. -N.Y. Post
Program Director, man or woman cap-
able of directing work of 4 profes-
sional associates, MA in Public Health
or other applicable field. I Friday and Saturday- 7 and 9:15 P.M.
Metropolitan Omaha Educational
Broadcasting Association, Inc., Omaha,
Neb.-Producer-Director, activity cen-
tered on Univ. of Omaha campus, work A U D ITOR I UM A
gradsprogram possible on tuition N L AL L
Brighton Argus, Inc, Printing and
Publishing, Brighton, Mich.-Advertis-
Ing man for sales and advertising make-
up. Commission and salary arrange-
Imen t. Wool

*

Ridgewood Hospital, Ypsilanti, Mich.
-Head of one-man pharmacy depart-
ment, registered pharmacist required.
Department of Naval Publications and
Printing Service, Wash., D.C.-FSEE ap-
plicants interested in careers in graphic
arts and visual communications, giv-
ing technical advice and guidance toI
Navy officials in all areas to meet
publications and forms requirements.
Management Consultants, Chicago, 111.
-Manager, Applied Physics for corpor-
ate research center, applied research
and decv. in acoustics. electrostatics,
solid state, NMR, ferroelectric fluids
and data storage. PhD grads with
several yrs. of exper. wishing to reach
high managerial position with large in-
dustrial research complex.
For further information please call
764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
Appointmentls, 3200 SAB.
Holding For a 2nd Week
ONE OF THOSE RARE ENTER-
TAINMENTS! FOR PEOPLE
WHO REALLY LOVE FILMS!"
-NewsweeK
Mis
F orman s
Released thru PROMINENT FILMS
Shows at 7 & 9 P.

c

NOW
DIAL 5-6290

SPECIAL SELECTIVE
ENGAGEMENT
NO SEATS RESERVED
Every Ticketholder Guaranteed a Seat
The Most Popular Picture Of Our Time!
WINNER OF 5 ACADEMY AWARDS
'T4~ Including aBest Picture"!
RODGERS. HAMMERSTEN
ROBERTWISE
COLOR
tr D8 LuxE
--'
JULEANDREWS- uspn PLUMMER
RICHARD HAYDN I0m rI ELEANOR PARKER;-
i u CHAPMII ROBERT WISE I RICHARD RODGERS
OSCAR HAMMERSTEIN11I ERNST LEHMAN

A
q

'0

SAIGON (M--The Vietnamese
t of living, a major factor in
epolitical war here against the
t Cong, has spurted upward
ain and threatens to spiral out
control.
In the first five months of the
ar, the cost of living index has
en 22 to 24 per cent. Only a
u weeks ago some U.S. sources
re saying the economy had been
atively ..stabilized.
Now some competent sources say
e big danger lies in the second
if of 1967.
The view is not unanimous with-
the American mission. But
ose looking on the bright side
k of keeping the total rise at
ween 30 and 50 per-cent this
ar. It went up 70 per cent in
66, and if it topped that figure
s year, the overheated economy
ild spin out of control.
The problem continues to be too
my piastres chasing too few
ods. But .the emphasis has
fted.
n 1966 the demand for import-
consumer goods, plus rice
culation, sent the economy sky-
keting. The United States,
ough its food and commodity
port programs, was' able to jam
ough goods into the market
ce to dampen the inflationary
es.
Now the pressure is on food

prices and for locally produced
goods a shift that apparently
caught the U.S. Agency for Inter-
national Development mission un-
prepared. The war-fed prosperity,
almost entirely restricted to urban
areas, has touched off widespread
demand for both better and more
food.
A U.S. source said there is no
plan to try to ease the situation
with imports financed by the U.S.
He added there also are no plans
for price and wage freezes or ra-
tioning, all three common in war
economies.

All Nights at 8 p.m.
Adults $2.50
Matinees Monday
through Friday 2 p.m.
Adults $2.00

Matinees Saturday
at 1:00 and 4:30
Adults $2.00
Matinees Sunday
at 1 :00 and 4:30
Adults $2.50

*

Children $1 .00 at all times

F-

.3

SUMMER STOCK PROGRAM
UNION-LEAGUE announces
INFORMAL MASS MEETING

flORID DAY/AIEA" AD A hDplay the game of excitement
IN THE CLIFF-HANGER OF THE YEARI

TUESDAY, 8:00 P.M.
Rocm 2X Union

The film makers
who brought you
A TASTE OF HONEY and
TOM JONES now take
pride in presenting...
GIRL WITH
GREEN EYES
A WOODFALL FILM
h*t'dab.d~ ly LOPIRT PICTURES CORPORATIONJ

I

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION

I

I

I

Student Book Service says
"Let's get the
BEACH BALL
rolling!"
UAC SUMMER
WEEKEND
JUNE 8-10

MSunday, June 4-730 P.M.
FREE.
RECORDS-REFRESHMENTS
GLICK SOCIAL HALL ALL ARE
at Hillel Foundation WELCOME
1429 Hill St.

I

I

.

I

11

I

Presents
Duck Soup
with
THE MARX
BROTHERS
in an uproarious
political farce
PLUS!
Extra Added Attraction

THIS WEEK!

TH E PLAYBOY
OF THE
WESTERN WORLD
--An Irish Classic!
-

Controversial?
...YES'
Different?
:..YES!
Adult?
...YES!

That's
MoRGAN!
FRI.-SUN. 1st show 7:00
Last complete show 8:30
SATURDAY 5:00
Last complete show 8:30
MON. thru THURS. 7 P.M.
"- T..

p

AAaron o[Pr c nD
CO-STARRING

I tk - -

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