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May 27, 1967 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1967-05-27

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PAGE TWO

THE MICIGEAN DAILY

U

FILMS Churchmen
Forman Constructs Delightful, Simple Wit Revise Faith

LABOR OPPOSES:
House Republicans Block Vote
On Public Employe Strike Bill

In Poetic Scenes of 'Loves of a Blonde'

Confession

By ANDREW LUGG
Milos Forman's film, "Loves- of
a Blonde," at the Campus Theatre
may be summed up in a few
words: delightful, unpretentious,
simple and controlled.
It rests on the simplest of story-
lines. A young girl Andula (Hana
Brejchova) falls in love with a
Jazz pianist, Milda (Vladimir
Pucholt) when he passes through
her home town, Zruc. She, dizzy
by the merest sniff of romance,
takes off for Prague, his home,
only to encounter Milda's overly
hostile parents. The mother sees
Andula as an intruder, who will
disrupt the uneasy battle that
rages within the family..
Forman does not suggest wheth-
er or not the mother's possessive-
ness wins out or if Milda and An-
dula "make it" permanently (as
opposed to "making it," which
they certainly do). The film closes
with Andula telling a friend that
she will be traveling to Prague
frequently.
Appeal of Content
So much for plot, which I have
tried to give true to the film's
"tone." I mean that except for the
film's ambiguous ending the con-
tent of "Loves of a Blonde" is very
much for the Doris Day sensibility.
Further more I have no qualms
about "'revealing the plot," since
we know it right from the start.
What raises "Loves" well above the
Rock Hudson/Doris Day genre
piece is the way in which Forman
has constructed the film.
First, and most important, For-
man chose black and white, the
standard, "grainy" film-stock,
which is reminiscent of, although
not quite so pronounced as, what
Godard used for his "Les Caribin-
eres." It is in the choice of these
three elements that Forman shows
himself to be a director of merit,
since they allow him to proceed
from the genre, to create a film of
immense pictorial elegance.
Quite simply, the small screen
implies an intimacy, which en-
hances Forman's "unpretentious-
ness." He had no desire to make
anything put of the story. He was,

= just trying to make, at the very
least, beautiful entertainment and
at most "a tone poem." This is
emphasized by his use of "grainy
grays," which take the edge of
"realism" and which provide an
easy transition to some almost ab-
stract scenes (sections in a long
dance-hall sequence where Andula
is "picked up" and parts of the
love scene). These scenes having
a texture as graceful as the best
of Jean Renoir.
Second, Forman shows again his
splendid wit. This too is. best Il-
lustrated by the dance-hall se-
quence, which lasts many minutes
and runs without dialogue. It is a
masterpiece of film-cutting and
camera movement. Gradually the
scene is built up. The "confronta-
tion" of three girls, including An-
dula, with three middle-aged sol-
diers becomes increasing ludicrous
as Forman probes their discomfort,

their plans and their unbelievable
naivete.
The love scene between Andula
and Milda also shows how For-
man can create a whole mood by
meticulously assembling a host
of details-small, unrelated shots,;
juxtaposed in such a way that nos
amount of description can reveal
the feel or tone they evoke (just
as a painting has a look which is
peculiar to the painting-indeed
is the painting). To be sure, thisl
scene is again reminiscent of God-
ard, particularly in the dialogue.
Andula: "Why ° did you say I
was angular?";
Andula: "Why did you say I wasf
angular?"
Milda: "You look like a guitarl
by Picasso."t
Such dialogue requires the film7
to take on some of the Godards
"look." 'Godard then seems to be
a small influence on Forman. Or<

is it that after Godard there is
no other way to film young
people?
Now, I am not suggesting that
Forman does not have a style of
his own. He certainly does. He is
a film-maker with an extensive
cinematic vocabulary which (and
this is the real test) he can con-
trol.
In spite of this we cannot say
"Loves of a Blonde" is a masterr
piece. It is not "gutsy" enough for
such a name-tag.
Nor is it as some critics have
made out, a fine documentary,
since Forman consistenly moves
away from the realistic toward
film poetry, melodrama, in the
best sense of the word.
t In the final analysis "Loves"
must be praised for its charm and
quiet wit, a couple of things, which
sadly are not too plentiful these
days.

Richardson Uses Aesop Fable Forms
In Disastrous 'Sailor From Gibraltar'

The Sailor from Gibraltar"
now playing at the Vth Forum,
can be a diastrous film if director
Tony Richardson is to be taken
seriously. Having weathered cre-
ations from "Tom Jones" to "Girl
with the Green Eyes," the director
should know well enough tha't
film fails if transposed into an
Aesop's Fable form.
It is a love story, with amateur-
ish intrigue added. But when
Jeanne Moreau, "the erotic neur-
otic," is combined with "The
Alienated Man," Ian Bannen, a
moral is bound to emerge with the
happy ending. Trite and outspoken
moralism fits poorly into any liter-
ary form. An experienced director
such as Tony Richardson should
know enough not to run a film in
this manner.
Richardson uses the rich hero-
ine's search for her lost lover-
sailor, and the hero's search for
'meaning,' in a constant driving
effort to illustrate that 'true hap-

piness can only be found in true
love.'
If the viewer allows the message
to dominate the rest of the film,
he has lost $1.50,
But the film deserves more than
a discrediting of outspoken moral-
isms. In many ways, it is humor-
ous high camp-appearing to be
almost out of the control of the
director. The audience often finds
itself laughing more out of a fam-
iliarity with a well-worn scene
than from a humor molded by the
film's creators.
These scenes seem to be a mix-
ture of poor writing and directing
with often excellent stock character
acting. The relationship of the
hero, Ian Bannen, with his mis-
tress of the first part of the film,
fills this formula well.tVanessa
Redgrave, traveling in Italy with
her mate-out-of-habit, ideally acts
out the part of a Jules Feifferish
clinging Woman. Completely blind
to his thought and unrest, she

gleefully follows him with giggles
and a kiss on the cheek wherever
he goes.
This is camp. Vanessa Red-
grave may be no more than a dis-
turbed Harriet Nelson - but she
does it believingly well. As for the
hero, he doesn't act-he bumbles.
He is clever enough to know his
first mistress is the cause of his
unhappiness, so what better cure
than a new woman?
The enjoyment or humor one
finds in the film (and nothing
else could certainly never be
found in it) emerges from the
mishaps and side adventures of
these pre-set characters. Events
of such ridiculous form occur that
the moralisms are forgotten.
Orson Welles comes forth to
fill the screen as an obese Arab-
ian, versed well in American slang.
And somehow, director Richard-
son managed to get in Hugh Grif-
fiths as the 'white hunter' boating
down the Nile with Jeanne Mo-
reau.
Moreau's lover-the sailor from
Gibraltar - is never found. Not
even in deepest Africa, nor in the
ruins of Alexandria. But the happy
ending does come.
"The Sailor from Gibraltar" is
well acted and full of a perhaps
mistaken camp humor. But the
film is a failure as far as what it
was meant to be. It leaves one
feeling a film can be enjoyable,
though never good, if it is done
poorly enough.

PORTLAND, Ore. P - The LANSING iP)-The House voted
United Presbyterian. Church in theThrdyttaliscorveil
USA adopted Thursday a history- Thursday to table its controversial
making new confession of faith- public employe strike bill, allow-
"The Confession of 1967"-cli- ing it to loom threateningly over
maxing nine years of work. It is this summer's teacher contract
the church's first creedal revision negotiations.
in three centuries. Flexing their muscles after
Its formal enactment came at Tuesday's special-eletion victory,
the denomination's governing gen- House Republicans slapped down
earal assembly, after last-hour by straight partyline votes Dem-
technical objections were turned ocratic attempts to put the bill
aside. to a vote and defeat it.
It states the relevance of Chris- Republican leaders obtained the
tian principles to current issues of suport of all 54 GOP members to
poverty, race relations, interna- table the get-tough measure,
tional peace and other public con- which labor spokesmen vehement-
cerns. ly opposed. But reportedly they
Besides restating beliefs in a could not get the votes required
modern idiom, the new confession to pass it.
also broadens the doctrinal footing The bill laid on the table re-
of the Church to recognize various mains alive and before the House.
classic Christian creeds used in A majority of the members after
other traditions. today could take it up and pass it
Among three are the Nicene and at any time.
Apostles creeds going back to early Possible Passage
Christianity and here tofore not . GOP Floor Leader Williiam
formally incorporated in Presby- Hampton of Bloomfield Hills said
terian teachings. that that would be done "if the
They, along with the Westmins- public employes engage in illegal
ter Confession, are to be included strikes, or if the courts do not act
in a new over-all Book of Confes- responsibly in dealing with illegal
sions, giving the 3.3-million-mem- strikes.
ber American Church a more In other Capital developments
ecumenical stance. Thursday:
The approximately 4,000-word -Lt. Gov. William Milliken
document had been revised and standing in for Gov. George Rom-
given preliminary approval at ney who was in New York City,
three previous governing assem- greeted about 200 Michigan State
blies. In the last year it was rati- University students who marched
fied by most of the Church's local on the Capitol Building to protest
units, called presbyteries. , a possible tuition increase.
Students Protest Number
Of Editor's Annual Photos
TAMPA, Fla. (P)-Some 1,700 might have to be hospitalized, her
copies of the Tampa University mother said.
yearbook were handed out Thurs- Miss Gonzalez gave herself a
six-page spread as yearbook queen,
day and students, angered at see- appearing in ten of 13 photog
ing the editor's picture 24 times, raphs covering the contest. The
built a bonfire and began tossing other pictures, she says, were there
them in. because she was a member of one
The editor missed the demon- clb o another.toth
stration, staged in connection with homecom the same playmost of
a protest of the suspension of two the time the editor hasn't been
football players and the onset of everything else too. Now, I'm
final examinations. afraid to go in for final exams,"
Carmen Gonzalex, 20, a classic she said.
Spanish beauty with shining black Underclassmen were especially
hair that reaches to her waist, is put out. After shelling out $9 for
the editor. She is also the year- the book "Moroccan" they found
book queen, an 'A' student and their pictures weren't in it at all.
member of ten campus organ- A fire had destroyed the pictures
izations. in an out-of-state plant where
Miss Gonzalez was so upset she hey were being made.

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-Atty. Gen. Frank Kelley ruled requirement for supervisory per-
that Milliken retains his power to sonnel:
cast a tie-breaking Senate vote -Creation of a new bargaining
even when serving as acting gov- step: Fact-finding by a 12-mem-
ernor. ber public employment relations
566 Million Miles panel which would be attached to
-The Highway Department the governor's office;
predicted that during the four- Prohibits Pickets
day Memorial Day weekend Mich- -A ban on picketing to force
igan motorists will drive 566 mil- recognition as a bargaining unit
lion miles, or enough to circle the and a requirement that certified
globe 226,600 times. employe groups bargain with the
-The Senate advanced to final employers.
vote stage a bill to sharply raise Several Republican members
state park entrance fees. Resident said privately that, despite pres-
fees would go from 50 cents to $1 sure from their leaders, they did
daily and from $1' to $3 a year. not want to vote for the bill.
Nonresident entrance fees would But the GOP leadership beat
go to $2 a day and $5 a year. Also down an attempt to put the meas-
give preliminary approval was a ure to a vote when Speaker Protein
$10 million bonding program foi' Martin Buth ruled the maker of
state park expansion and land r the motion-Rep. John Kelsey (I-
purchase. Warren). out of order because he
The public employ strike bill, made a "statement" before asking
amended by Republicans Thurs- for the vote.
day, includes these controversial Futile Attempt
features. Kelsey's statement was: "You're
Anti-Striker Injunctions a good speaker, too, Mr. Buth."
mjudges Democrats made a futile attempt
-The requirement that jgestto overrule Buth's decision, but
must issue injunctions against lost 54-48 on another party-line
striking public employes: tally
-Binding arbitration of labor te sy.
disputes involving police and fire After the bill was disposed of.
employes; Speaker Robert Waldron (R-
-A provision that public em- drosse Pointe), said one member
ployes may not be affiliated "with had tried to lure another out of
any labor organization which as- the chamber during a crucial vote
serts the right to strike against by sending him a forged note say-
government"; ing Gov. George Romney wanted
to see him.
Bans Labor Protests
-A specific ban on public em-
ploye strikes called to protest un-

*

c

fair labor practices by their em-
ployers;
--Requirement that police and
fire employes may not belong to
a union which represents other
types of employes, and a similar

I

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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
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sity of Michigan for which The c
Michigan Daily assumes no editor- I
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sent in TYPEWRITTMN form to
boom 3564 Administration Bldg. be- I
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Notices may, be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only. I
Student organization notices are not I
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.1
SATURDAY, MAY 27s
Day Calendar F
Cinema Guild - "Tillie's Punctured
Romance": Architecture Aud., 7 and
9:05 p.m.
General Notices
Doctoral Examination for James Leei
Kopp, Psychology; thesis: "I Sees 'Em
as I Calls 'Em: Hue Discrimination and
Hue Naming across Cultures," Mon.,
May 29, City Center Bldg., at 9 a.m.
Chairman, H. L. Lane.
Doctoral Examination for George Lee3
Huttar, Linguistics: thesis: "An Experi-
mental Study of Some Relations Be-
tween the Emotions and the Prosodic
Parameters of Speech,," Mon., May 29,
East Conference Room, Rackham Grad-
uate School, at 1 p.m. Chairman, G. E
Peterson.r
ICC Speaker Forum: CongressxanI
Marvin Esch will speak on "The Af-
fect of US. Domestic Policy on In-
ternational Affairs," Sat., May 27, 7I
p.m., at 917 S. Forest.

town newspapers. Service includes mar-
keting and adv. studies for adv. agen-
cies and national agencies on local
newspapers. Booklets available at Bu-
reau..
Lord's Furniture, Saginaw, Mich.'-
Interior Decorator, male or female,
are bkgd., possibly degree in Int. Des.,
but not mandatory. Decoration speciali-
zation, exper. in sleling helpful is
want to go into this phase.
Local Social Services Agency, Annt
Arbor, Mich. {-Secretaries for county em-
ployment, experienced women desired,
3-5 yrs. pref. Accurate typing, short-
hand not mandatory. Private secretarial,
positions and sr. positions. Desire per-
sonal qualities for client contacts later.
Kenyon and Eckhardt, Inc., Detroit,
Mich.-StaffAssistant, Media Dept. De-
sire man, degree not required if 1-2
yrs. exper,, math and mktg. bkgds.
Agency handling automotive clients in
total adv. campaigns.
Juvenile Court of Jackson, Jackson,
Mich.-Nearby resident of Jackson for
Probate Officer, several openings, BA
in soc. service field, new grad or young
alumni. Prefer men.
* * *
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available in
Room 1311 SAB.
Lutheran Student Chapel, Hill St. at
Forest Ave., Sun., May 28 ,10 a.m.,
worship service, 5:30 ,p.m.* supper. and

For further information please call
764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAB.
.Part-Time
Em plo yment
Experienced Keypunch Operator -
Needed immediatelyforh two week as-
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evening shift available.
Qualified applicants please contact:
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Do You Enjoy Acting
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UNION-LEAGUE

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SUNDAY, MAY 28, 1967
Room 2X, Union
7:00 P.M,

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