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May 25, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1967-05-25

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THE MICIC.,N DAILY

THURSM

FILMS

oppy' Shows Flower Power
ff Unscsfu 00 7 Tk e-offCSS

Marines MIove Closer to anoi

SAIGON {AP'-By moving up to trition that is
the Ben Hai River in Vietnam's I heavily.

costing the

Marines 1
1!

By AVIVA KEMPNER
'he advertisement claims that
he Poppy is Also a Flower" of-
's "excitement from the James
nd director, suspense from the
ator of 007, and blazing action
these internationally famous
irs" which are listed in alpha-
ical order.
But the movies does not live up
these expectations. Just the
ry idea comes from Ian Flem-
r, so the movie script does not
nsist of the usual "suspense"
Lnd in the James Bond movies.
.th this big difference, even the
mes Bond director, Terence
ung, can not make the film
ntain "excitement." And the
1g list of- "internationally fam-
s stars" (which were not that
sy to recognize) did not have
e script that required full per-
-mances of "blazing action."
The plot deals with the break-
of a world-wide opium con-

spiracy. The good guys are the
United Nations officers working
through narcotics bureaus of their
respective countries, not Britain's
Secret Service. And the bad guys
are a group consisting of a play-
boy and gangsters notSmersh, who
are trying to corrupt the world
with their dope ring. Within this
group is the only resemblance to
the James Bond movies-Odd Job
of Goldfinger fame.
The two agents (E. G. Marshall
and Trevor Howard) who play the
largest role in the movie and in
solving the case are middle-aged,
not young and dashing. Their at-
and somewhat mild-mannered,
tempts at humor and action often
fall flat. Instead of depending on
fantastic devices to combat their
enemy, they use brut force and not
always so successfully. In a situa-
tion that requires only one of
them they play the "stone, paper,
and scissors' game to decide who
goes.

They travel all over Asia and
Europe following up clues mostly
of a radioactive nature. ,The best
scenes of the movie involve their
confrontations with the officials
of the different countries. Yul
Brunner in his familiar habitat
on horseback gives a convincing
performance. Marcello Mastroianni
as an Italian officer adds one of
the few humorous highlights by
continually smoking an unlighted
cigarette.
Some of the other guest stars
and quick bits offer good enter-
the movie consists of chases that
tainment. On the whole, however,
do not raise any blood counts and
moralistic dialogue on the use of
drugs that did not sound too con-
vincing.
Even if a movie does not adhere
to the claims of it publicly it can
bs a good one. But in the case of
"The Poppy is also a Flower" the
movie is not only poor but also
a bore.

buffer zone U.S. Marines have
brought the allies' front line about
three miles closer to Hanoi.
It seems likely this push will
only momentarily upset the mil-
itary balance along the sensitive
17th Parallel that separates the
two Vietnams.
Few doubt that the enemy will
lose some bases in the southern
half of the zone, dig their artil-
lery in a little deeper elsewhere
and continue the bitter war of at-

If the Marines want a spoiling
battle, they will have to go deeper.
And that decision rests with
Washington. There is no question
in Saigon is that they won't get it.
that some soldiers would welcome
the chance, but the official view
The North Vietnamese may give
the decision more urgency, how-
ever, with an escalation of their
own. They have usually made some
reply to major U.S. moves.
U.S. officers have long been

braced for a major test in the sen-'
sitive demilitarized zone area
where the North Vietnamese, ac-
cording to allied intelligence, have
masse" some 35,000 regular troops.
Heavy rocket, artillery and mor-
tar reinforcements have recently
poured in and the enemy has be-
gun to nestle SAM sites for the
Soviet antiaircraft missiles right
on the northern border of the de-
militarized zone.
The arrival of the SAMs so far
south caused the U.S. Air Force
to stop B52 raids in the zone area

VIET'NAM HERO:-
Army Major Defects to Cuba
For 'Reasons of Conscience'

at a time when they were needed.
The high-altitude Strategic Air
Command bombers were too vul-
nerable to missiles like these that
once downed a U2 ovei the Soviet
Union.
The ability of the North Viet-
namese to bring the SAM to the
border despite constant U.S. Air
pressure emphasizes their infiltra-
tion capabilities and why the war
is the way it is today.
The Marines, fighting near Red
supply points, have been hit hard-
est. Farther south, supply prob-
lems limit the Viet Cong to less
frequent attacks.
But month in and month out
the American intelligence estimate
of Communist troop strength
throughout South Vietnam has
remained fairly stable-some 285,
000 guerrillas, hardcore Viet. Cong
and North Vietnamese regulars.
Startingly one-sided victories'
are scored but the enemy unitsf
reappear, their ranks filled in-
creasingly with replacements.
Wait for Monsoon
The U.S. Air Force hopefully be-
lieves it can alter the seeming
stalemate in a short period when
bad weather over North Vietnam
clears with the changing of the
monsoon season, due any day.,
In the face of Hanoi's fantastic
supply deployment, however, that
view is problematical. It appears
certain the air war is curtailing
the supply flow. Thus far, Hanoi
and its allies have been willing to
make up the difference.
It is widely accepted that'despite
some waning enthusiasm the ene-

my command still feels it will gain
a political-military victory in
South Vietnam.
The U.S. antidote to this has
become "unrelenting pressure,"
coupled with greater emphasis on
military campaigns,
Pessimists among high U.S. of-
pacification programs paralleling
ficials see the war taking a decade.
Optimists speak of two to three
years.
It is generally felt that despite
the major campaign shaping up
in the Marine-held provinces, the
military war is .in a'moment of in-
decisiveness.
U.S. commanders see their gains
thus far as solid but not decisive.
They look to the next six months
for some better indication of the
future.
480,009 Men
Within that time the U.S. force
level will near 480,000 men, fewer
than Gen. William . Westmore-
land wants but about all he ap-
pears sure to get at present.
Top military officers claim that
after two years of search and de-
stroy operations Westmoreland is
in a better strategic position than
ever to deploy his forces.
But at the moment U.S. officers
are less inclined to make sweeping
predictions than they were earlier.
CINEMA II
presents
JACK LEMMON
MARILYN MONROE
TONY CURTIS
in

. s+{?fi fer S t k <x7os 3ak r .,'"'tf ".':"aN"rv ?v:vr>rva:>tia ," . x "x,2 s

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

fi'
r
,.'i;i

7
7
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7

HAVANA (P) - Maj. Richard'
Harwood Pearce, a medal winner
in Vietnam who was cleared to
handle secret U.S. Army material,
has defected to Cuba "for reasons
of conscience," the government
announced Wednesday. He is the
highest U.S. officer to defect in
the cold war.
The announcement said Pearce,
36, arrived Sunday in a light plane
with, his young son Richard Jr.,
landing at Liberty Airport near
Havana. A wide search had been
pressed for him from Florida when
his plane failed to return from
what authorities thought was a
pleasure flight.
No Other Reasons
The reasons for his defection
were not spelled out. The govern-
ment announcement said only that

ernment Tuesday informed the
Swiss Embassy. which handles U.S.
affairs in Cuba, that Pearce and
his son had landed and were seek-
ing asylum.
Keeper of Secrets
As senior aide to Lt. Gen. Tho-
mas W. Dunn, 4th Army com-
mander at Ft. Sam Houston, San
Antonio, Tex., Pearce had been
cleared to handle secret military
material.
A Defense Department spokes-
man in Washington said despite
his position and clearance for top
secret material Pearce never held
a highly sensitive post. He added
that Pearce generally would have
access only to secret documents
applying to his area of responsi-
bility, the 4th Army. The Penta-
gon said Pearce carried no secret

.,* . ... . . ..... ...........................

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
rfitial pubicration of the Univer-
ty of tdienlgan for which The
Iichigan Dlaily assumes no editor-
i responsibility. Notices should be
et in TYPEWkitTTIEN form to
nom 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
ire 2 p.m. of the day preceding
ulibIcation and by 2 p.m. Friday
or Satarday and Sunday. General
otices may be published a maxi-
num of two Umns on request; Dlay
alendar items appear once only.
tudent organizstioo notices are not
'epted for publication. For more,
aformation cal 764-9270.
THURSDAY, MAY 25
Day Calendar
ureal of Industrial Relations Sem-
r-"Effective College Recruiting and
erviewing": Michigan Union, 8:45
. to 5 p.m.
ureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
r-"What Managers Should Know
out Behavioral Science": Michigan
ion, 8:45 a.m. to 5 p.m.
[ichigan Nurses Association-"Keep-
in Step with Change": Rackham
g., Registration, 8:30 am. (Section
and 9:30 a.m. (Section II).
ecture--Dr. Francois Jacdb, renown-
French biologist and 1965 Nobel
ze winner to speak, on "On the
ulation of DNA Synthesis and Cel-
ar Division in the Bacterial Cell"
it 1): 5330 Medical Science Bldg.,
a..
oology Seminar-Mrs. Lewis J. Klein-
Lth, Department of Life Sciences, The
ckefeller University, New York, "Nu-
ar Phosphoproteins and Gene Func-
a": 1139 Natural Science Bldg., 2
n. i
nternational Center Tea-603 East
dison, 4:30 p.m.
General Notices
loctoral Examination for Stuart Alan
rabenick, Psychology; thesis: ."The
ect of Consummatory Behavior on
Strength of an Immediately Subse-
mt Instrumental Response," Thurs.,
y 25, Room 3410 Mason Hall, at 4
n. Chairman, J. D. Birch.
loctoral Examination for Ferrel Ger-
i Stremler, Electrical Engineering;
sis:' "Estim ,tion of Phase Differ-
:es between' Stochastic Narrowband
;als," Thurs., June 29, Room 4511
st Engineering, at 5 p.m. Chairman,
M. Brown.
,ecture: Prof. Joel Shanan of the De-#
tment of Psychology, Research Cen-
for Human Relations; at New York
)RGANIZATION'
NOTICES
JSE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
UNCEMIENTS is available to officially
ognized and registered student or-
aizations only. Forms are available in
omr 1011 SB.;
Christian Science Organization, Week-
testimony meeting, Thurs., May 25,
0-8:30 p.m., 3545 SAB.
Folk Dance Club (WAA), Folk dance
h instruction open to everyone, Fri.,
y 26, 8-11 p.m., Barbour Gym,

University, will speak on "A Predic-
tive Study of a Psychosomatic Ailment,
Amenorrhea," Thurs., May 25, at 3:45
p.m. in the Mental Health Research In-
stitute, Room 1057. A tea will be given
before the lecture at 3:15 in Room
2059.
Computing Center Course: The Com
puting Center announces a short course
"The Use of the IBM 360/67 MTS Sys-
tem, including Fortran IV." Fri., May
26, 1-5 p.m., Room 1400 Chemistry Bldg.
Registration not necessary. Inquiries
may be addressed to Prof. Bernard A.
Galler.
Seminar: On Fri., May 26, Dr. Da-
vid Lloyd, from the Department of Mi-
crobiology at the University College of
South Wales, Cardiff, will present a
seminar on "Some Aspects of Mito-
chondria from Algae and Protozoa," at
4 p.m. in 1139 Natural Science (Botany
Seminar Room). This seminar is spon-
sored by the Department of Zoology.
Student Laboratory Theatre Program:
Dept. of Speech performance of scenes
from "The Curmudgeon" by Menander
and "Casina" by Platus, Thurs., May 25,.
4:10 p.m., Arena Theatre, Frieze Bldg.
Admission free.,
Doctoral Examination for Lee James
White, Electrical Engineering; thesis:
"A Parametric Study of Matchings and
Coverings in Weighted Graphs,' Fri.,
May 26, Room 2201 East Engineering, at
2 p.m. Chairman, E. W. Lawler,
Student Gvernment Council Approval
of the following student sponsored
events becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All pub-
licity for these events must be with-
held until the approval has become ef-
fective.
Approval request forms for student
sponsored events are available in Room
1011 of the BAB.
Michigan Christian. Fellowship, Car
wash, May 27, 1-5 p.m., Business Educa-
tion parking lot,
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Standard Packaging Corp., Royal Lace
Paper Div., Ft. Wayne, Ind.-Industrial

engineer for paper conversion plant.
Graduate in top half of class.]
County of Wayne, Civil Service Com-
mission, Detroit, Mich.-Food Service
Manager for Child Development Center
kitchens, institution houses 600 edu-
cable mentally handicapped and emo-
tionally maladjusted children. BA de-
gree in any field, and min. 1-3 yrs
supervising moderately large food serv-
ice operation.
Dow Chemical Co., Midland, Mich.-
Summer position for person working
on MLS degree with undergrad degree
chemistry or other related sciences.]
Library Services group, challenging work
of project nature. Also permanent libr.
sci. positions available with Dow Chem.
Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corp., De-
troit, Mich.-Administrative Trainee,]
degree in some business field prefer-
red, moderately strong acctg. bkgd.
National Jewish Post and Opinion,
Indianapolis, Ind.-Chain of 4 weekly
papers seeks recent graduate with 1
plus yrs. exper. in field. Mostly re-
writing, copy reading and makeup work.
Previous exper. should be broad and'
responsible.
Greer School, Hope Farm, Greer, N.Y.1
-Caseworker in Soc. Service dept., part
of team working with caseloads of 24
children between 5 & 18. Bach. level
degree and considerable emotional ma-
turity. Stipend for going on to MSW
after 1 yr. ebployment. .
Technical Mgmt. Consultants, Birm-
ingham, Ala.--Openings for engrs,, ac-
counting, programmers, math, physi-
cists, draftsmen, data processors, all de-
gree levels, exper. & no exper.
Greater Cleveland Neighborhood Cen-
ters Association, Cleveland, Ohio -
Neighborhood - based social services
needs workers for Group Services and
Development Services. Graduates in Ed.,
soc., pre-social work, psych., poll. sci.,
and MSW. Adult and child services.
Gilbert Shoe Stores, Inc., Columbus,
Ohio-Administrative Assistant to the
president. Some exper. in retail foot-
wear or closely related field, major
strength in mgmt., rather than mktg.
or finance Capable of analysis and
dev. plans, short range and long term.
For further information please call
764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAB.

Pearce's former wife, Sandra
Mitchell, said in Houston he picked
up their son last Friday, saying
he was going on a vacation. Later
she declined to comment on the
defection.
Pearce is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Walter N. Pearce of Birming-
ham, Ala. The elder Pearce, in-
formed of the Havana report,
would only say "at least he's
alive."
Pearce served as executive of-
ficer of the 1st Battalion, '2nd
Brigade, 7th Infantry Division be-
fore leaving for Vietnam. He was
adviser to a Vietnamese battalion
and chief of the 4th Corps Tact-
ical Operations Center at Can
Tho, south of Saigon.
He was awarded the Bronze
Star for meritorious service in
connection with ground operations
with the South Vietnamese 2lst
Division.
Pearce is a native of Jackson-
ville,F la.
Phone 431-0130
Ef4Cv4Or CARPENTER ROAD
NOW SHOWING OPEN 7:00 P.M.
Shown
at
s :05 & 11:45
:.. :.: : M*DU -

he, had been granted asylum orIpapers to Havana.

aaa,. aawu rrv .aa +wasvvu we, "... .+-

permission to go to any other
country. The government gave no
indication of his whereabouts.
"I have decided to part from
my country in the company of my
41/2-year-old son for reasons of
conscience and request Cuban au-
thorities to grant us asylum or
authorization to proceed to an-
other country of my choice,",said
a note bearing Pearce's signature
appearing on the front page of
the Communist paper Granma.
The announcement said the gov-
DIAL 5-6290
RODGERS- HAMMERSTEIN'Sp
ROBERT WISE

Pearce was on leave from his
post, was due back in Ft. Sam
Houston Thursday.
Under Strain
Jim Dunn, an airplane service
employe at Key West, Fla., said
Pearce arrived there Thursday
night from Houston, Tex. He said
Pearce told him he had just
bought the plane, a Cessna, in
Houston. He added that Pearce
seemed to be under some sort of
strain.

Billy Wilder's
SOME

THE POPPY
IS ALSO
A FLOWER

LIKE

IT

presents
THE GREATEST
COMEDY STARS
OF ALL TIME
in the
LAFF-RIOT
{FUN-FEST
IOF THE CENTURY
" Charley Chaplin's
TILLIE'S PUNCTURED
ROMANCE
* Harold Lloyd's
THE BABY SITTER'
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
7:00 & 9:05 P.M.
ARCH ITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
--STILL ONLY 50c-

Show Times:
Tues.-Thurs.
7,9
Ann Arbor, Michigan
z10-. Fifth Avenue
761-9700

HOT
(1959)

"Outrageously Funny!
Top-flight Performances"
--NY Times
"Far and Away Wilder's
Funniest Movies"
-Hubert Cohen

E

A LSO . . ,
TEGNICDLQR' Shown at 10:00 Only
PLUS
"HOLIDAY IN NEW ORLEANS"
COLOR CARTOON

i

9 III I _____ __ 1

Friday
and
Saturday

7 & 9:15 P.M.
500

Aud. A, Angell Hall

TODAY

4:10 P.M.

i

SCENES FROM
THE CURMUDGEON by Menander
and
CASINA by Plautus
STUDENT LABORATORY THEATRE PROGRAM
Department of Speech
ARENA THEATRE, Frieze Building ADMISSION FREE
THE INTERNATIONAL DINNER-FILM SERIES PRESENTS
The Venice Film Festival Grand Prize Winner
"UGETSU!
"Billed as a successor to Rashomon but artistically superior"
following a JAPANESE DINNER
FRIDAY, MAY 26 6 p.m.
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER, 1432 Washtenow
Reservations: 662-3580 or 662-5529
Americans-$1 Foreign Students-50c
SPONSORED BY THE ECUMENICAL CAMPUS MINISTRY

n.ENDREWS'" cHrninPEPLUMMER
RICHARD HAYDN I 'S ==="
ELEANOR PARKERgz
IROBERT WISi HARD RODGERS
OSCAR HAMMERSTEIN iIi ENEST LEHMAN
Mon. thru Fri. 2 P.M.-$2.00
Sat. 1 :00-4:30-$2.00
Sun. 1 :00-4:30-$2.50
All Nights 8 P.M.-$2.50
Children All Times--$1.00

Spending
the Summer
in Ann Arbor?
ENJOY IT MORE
with
UNIVERSITY
PLAYERS !

,- -

"EXTRAORDINARYI HONEST HUMORf"
-Time Magazine
"DELIGHTFUL AND UNUSUAL,
A COMEDY OF THE GRANDEST SORT!"
-Crowther, N.Y. Times
"A PLEASURE TO WATCH-A -PLEASURE
TO RECOMMEND!"-Archer Winsten, New York Post

i Sq a
S
\,.

JEANNE MOREAU 'IAN BANNEN 'fVANESSA REDGRAVE
GU.ST STARS HUGH GRIFFITH AND ORSON WELLES 2iA MOHYEDDIN
IONY RICHARDSON 5.
A WOODFAL ILM '1
V *STRJ D Y OPLRT PlCTIURk. CORPORATION
SHOW TIMES
FRIDAY 7, 9, 11
SATURDAY 7, 9, 11
SUNDAY 5, 7, 9

WALT DiSNEYS,
Ea a AY" EHAGEN c iKEL AY
114-11111,11 by M.A V1111
m SCURBY - .ESERFIELD w JACQUES AUBUCHOR @1%?WAtT lislijY fOUC IONS
xfeptymBILL WALSH and LVLLIE HAYWARD'" Co pwduc'r BILL WALSH edoy,CHARLES BARTON
aa
WALT.DISNEY'S
'the bseht111m, nded
'RING ProfespO r
- aaMRA 'nOSN enaVN ouyll

I

"VERY MUCH WORTH SEEING l"
Crist, World Journal Tribune

See 5 Great Shows!
* THE PLAYBOY
OF THE WESTERN
WORLD
* MACBETH
* THE PHYSICISTS
* THE COUNTRY WIFE
* LITTLE MARY
SUNSHINE
Season Tickets
Now Available
at the Box Office
Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre

4

"'RARE ENTERTAINMENT! A GEM 1"
--Newsweek
"MARVELOUSI"-William Wolf, Cue Magazine
"WMR IV MASTERFUL! REMARKABLE!

I

': - .} -

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