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July 08, 1960 - Image 7

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1960-07-08

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

oyce Sees Indian
'hanks for U.S. Aid

CONVENTION MANEUVERS:
Democratic Forces Ponder Strategy

('.

India will give the United States
its lasting gratitude if the eco-
nomic stress of the Asian nation
is relieved with an assistance pro-
gram that "will support rather
than replace Indian leadership."
Prof. Earnest Boyce, chairman
of the civil engineering depart-
ment, reported on the state of
affairs in India to the Conference
on Civil Engineering Education
yesterday. He has just returned
from a three-month tour of that
country where he studied water
supply and sanitation programs
for the International Cooperation
Agency.
India now feels favorably to-
ward the United States and the
gratitude would be similar to that
which we feel for European na-
tions which helped us during the
years of our struggle for inde-
pendence.
Reception Friendly
President Dwight D. Eisenhow-
er's recent reception in India is
evidence of the present friendly
attitude, Prof. Boyce said.
"The people were still talking
about it with evident pleasure that
there should have been this pop-
ular response," he reported, but
"it was in no way a staged dem-

onstration for the people in India
are free, truly free to respond as
they will."
Prof. Boyce was warmly re-
ceived by the Indians but he cau-
tioned future visitors to remember
that they are guests of India, if
they wish to be treated cour-
teously.
India's neutrality is due to its
reluctance to tie its natural des-
tiny to one side or the other. Na-
tional self-interest is important
to the Indian, and, uncommitted,
the country is free to receive aid
from both the Communists and
the West.
External Affairs
India also has no time, energy
or resources to waste on problems
it considers external. Neutrality
does not violate Ghandi's policy
of non-aggression, Prof. Boyce
added.
The percentage of India's pop-
ulation with protected water sup-
ply in 1961 will be less than 1951
despite advances in the sanita-
tion field. This problem illustrates
India's problems of progress that
is too slow for the population in-
crease.

By FRED S. HOFFMAN
Associated Press Political Writer
WASHINGTON-Can Sen. John
F. Kennedy make it on an early
ballot?
On which ballot will Sen. Lyn-
don B. Johnson make his big
push?
Which way will California and
Pennsylvania go?
Strategists for rival Democratic
camps pondered these and myriad
other questions Wednesday as they
scanned delegate lists and weighed
voting strengths in advance of
the party convention opening in
Los Angeles next Monday.
Fifth Ballot
Forces working for Texas' John-
son said in Washington they are
setting sights on winning the
Democratic presidential nomina-
tion for their man no later than
the fifth ballot.
Oscar L. Chapman, co-charman
of the Citizens for Johnson cam-
paign organization, said the drive
of Massachusetts' Kennedy "has
gone about as far as it can go."
And this, Chapman added, is short
of the 761 votes needed to win
nomination.
Chapman estimated a break in
Kennedy's strength will begin on
the third ballot, with a Johnson
victory on the fourth or fifth.
Kennedy Ahead
Kennedy currently is the ac-
knowledged frontrunner. The Sen-
ator has said he. expects 600 votes
on an earlybut not necessarily
the first -- ballot. Some of his
backers claim he will be well over
600 on the first call of the states.
At the convention site, it began
to look as though the 81-vote
California and Pennsylvania dele-
gations might hold the key posi-
tions. Both are nominally uncom-
mitted.
Reports continued that Cali-
fornia's Gov. Edmund G. Brown
was inclined toward Kennedy.
Some informed labor union
sources were saying Pennsylvania's
Gov. David L. Lawrence will try
to line up a majority of his state's
votes back of Sen. Stuart Syming-
ton of Missouri.
Roll Call Important
Meanwhile, it appeared the first
big test of strength might develop
over the order in which states
should be allowed to switch their

votes, if they so desired, during
the first ballot.
The Kennedy group hopes to
demonstrate so much strength on
the first ballot that other delega-
tions will want to switch their
votes and climb aboard the band-
wagon. The Johnson people want
to prevent any stampede of this
sort.
The question of vote switching
may have .to be decided by the
full convention.
Symington is playing for a dead-
lock between Kennedy and John-
son.
So are politicos who hope to
land the third nomination for
Adlai E. Stevenson, the party's
losing presidential candidate in
1952 and 1956.
Stevenson, steadfastly clinging
to his role as a noncandidate, said
Set Programs
For Organist,
Carillonneur
Prof. Marilyn Mason Brown of
the musical school will play an
organ recital at 4:15 p.m. Sun-
day in Hill Aud.
The program will include music
for basses and organ, with George
Cavender, assistant director of
University bands, conducting the
brass ensemble.
"Fanfare for Organ and Brass,"
a contemporary number by John
Cook, composer-in-residence for
the Stratford Festival, will make
its Ann Arbor debut.: The work
was commissioned by Prof. Brown
and is dedicated to her.
University carillonneur Percival
Price will play a series of four
Argentine folk dances at 7 p.m.
tomorrow on the Baird Memorial
Carillon.
The selections, arranged by
Prof. Price and Prof. James D.
Salmon of the music school, will
feature cymbals, snare drums and
bass drum in addition.
The program will commemorate
the 150th anniversary of Argen-
tine independence, and a program
of dancing and slides will take
place in Rackham Aud. immed-
iately after the concert.

it is "possible but not probable"
that he would get the nomination
again this time.
Speaking on a TV interview
taped in Chicago, Stevenson di-
vorced himself from a claim by a
leading backer that the former
Illinois Governor would have a
beachhead on the first ballot and
take it all later.
Stevenson said he is "really not
at all familiar with what the
distribution of the ballots is" nor
his prospects for nomination.
President Dwight D. Eisen-
hower, meeting with newsmen for
the first time in eight weeks, said
Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrush-
chev has been making "very crude
attempts" to intrude into the
United States political campaign.
-I don't believe that either side
is going to try to find any advan-
tage in whatever his advice to
both of us (Democratic and Re-
publican parties) may be," Eisen-
hower said. -
As for his own plans for the
coming campaign, the President
said he currently is scheduled only
for a speech to the Republican
convention in Chicago.

'U' To Host
Biological
symposium
An estimated 400 biologists will
attend the 11th annual Summer
Biological Symposium at the Uni-
versity, running from Monday
through Wednesday.
The symposium will feature
talks and discussions on the na-
ture of cellular life and its reac-
tion to viral infections. The pur-
pose of the meeting is to show
how viruses may be used to learn
the functions of the cell.
Sponsored by the University's
Division of Biological Sciences,
the symposium will attract sci-
entists from the National Insti-
tutes of Health, drug companies
and government biological war-
fare specialists.
Pierre Fredericq of the Univer-
sity of Liege, Belgium, Alfred
Gottschalk of the National Uni-
versity, Canberra, Australia, and
other prominent scientists from
America will participate in the
program.
Prof. W. W. Ackerman of the
public health school will chair-
man the meeting.

31

GRAD STUDENT COUNCIL Presents
SOCIAL HOUR
5-7 . . . each Friday in July
VFW CLUB
314 East Liberty
everyone must be 21 or over

NOW

in

DIAL
NO 8-6416

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

N AI ADY ROBMT HW M R SM.MA a I"r
No Omo4 fERDRJC D9 moD *bywg1AMPS gLYUSPROULCTIOM -* ATRNC M IauSE

STARTING TODAY!
"Ernest Borgnine in
pIALNQ5-6290 'Pay or Die' is a sure
Oscar winner."
--LEE MORTIMER-N. Y. Mirror
THE TRUE-AS-IFE-AND-DEATH STORY OF THE
MAN WHO LED THE FIT ,AGAINST THE MAFIA

1'

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no edi-
torial responsibility. Notices should
be sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Build-
ing, before 2 p.m. two days preced-
ing publication.
FRIDAY, JULY 8, 1960
VOL. LXX, NO. 13S
General Notices
Astronomy Department Visitors' Night.
Fri., July 8, 8:30 p.m., Room 2003 Angell
Hall. Stephen Maran will speak on "The
Other Side of the Moon." After the lec-
ture the Student Observatory on the
ALL-CAMPUS
DANCE
TONITE
League Ballroom
PROMETH EAN
508 E. William -
Wed. and Thurs.-Poetry
Fri. and Sat.-Folk songs
(50c door charge)
Sunday-JAZZ--12 p.m.
(75c door charge)
Open daily 8 p.m. to 2 a.m.

fifth floor of Angell Hall will be open
for inspection and for telescopic ob-
servations of Jupiter and Saturn. Chil-
dren welcomed, but must be accomp-
anied by adults.
Tonight 8:00 p.m. Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre, the Department of Speech pre-
sents Jean Giraudoux's sophisticated
comedy, Amphitryon 38. Performances
through Saturday evening. Tickets also
available for remaining productions of
the summer playbill.
Lectures
Lecture: Henry Steele Commager, au-
thor, educator and historian will speak
on the "International Implications of
Economic Change" on Fri., July 8, at
4:10 p.m. in Aud. A.
Placement Notices
Dupont, .Brevard, North Carolina.
Mechanical supervisor in plant engi-
neering dept. Recent grad, E.E. or M.E.
rSmith Kline & French Labs, Phila-
delphia. Positions in Administrative,
Manufacturing and Financial Division
Training Programs. Recent grad who
has been just released from the armed
forces. Liberal Arts or B"s. Ad. degree.
Klamath Falls Public Schools, Oregon.
Cafeteria Manager.
Chicago Natural History Museum,
Chicago. Woman, with major work in
Geology. Position in Raymond Founda-
tion Division organized for educational
programs, especially for school groups
and children.
Large Company In Toledo. Position
in creative writing department. Grad
with two or three years experience.
Man.
Detroit Public Schools, School-Com-
munity Agents. Education should in-
clude study in several of these areas:
Social Work, Guidance Services, Coun-
seling, Personnel Administration, Ap-
plied Psychology, Administrative and
Occupational Information, Sociology,
Mental Hygiene. Also experience in
some of these areas.
We have "50" Boston, a listing of
selected positions open within a 50
mile radius of Boston. If you are in-
terested in the Boston area, ask to see
this listing.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 4021 Admin.
Bldg., ext. 3371.

111

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2000 WEST STADIUM

AND TOMORROW NIGHT 8:00
TNI GHT LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
4 PERFORMANCES CONTINUE
Jean Giraudoux' sparkling comedy,
amp itryon

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